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Purty Lil' Rattler Today


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Yo All...I was high tailing up the road to see if I could scrape one more nuggie out of the patch (I think I've worked out) and this cute little red mohave was laying in the trail, soaking sun in today's fridgid temps (about 72---brrrrr---mukluk weather)....She looked like either she had a real good meal lately or maybe was full of baby rattlers--Real purty little snake...No nuggets today, but I found another wash system in the area that looks promising...Actual round, really round, water worn ironstained quartz, the right color, ironstone and what looks to be arsenopyrite...All up on a hillside...Good indicators for the area...Cheers, Unc

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Geez Ron ... I would take 72 degrees today here in NH. It is only 58 and a bit of a breeze. Tomorrow however, through Mon-Tue is supposed to be in the 90's and maybe reach 100 in interior sections. Oh yah ... forgot the humidity is scheduled to be in the 90-95% area. Just getting out of bed in the morning one could be drenched in sweat!! But then as we say here in New England ... wait 5 minutes and she'll change!

Mike

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Nice to see some folks getting out and prospecting. The fuel prices are really putting a damper on my ability to get out to prospect, so seeing your photos and hearing your stories makes it a lot easier. :icon_mrgreen: Nice looking snake, sounds like the snakes are out in full force this year.

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Uncle Ron

Although I can't see his tail too well, I suspect that your snake is the more common Tiger rattlesnake, (Not a Mojave). I have run across a few tiger's at Rich Hill. Mojave's will have a less even banding with a more pronounced white banding at the end of its tail. The Tiger will have more pronounced black banding at the end of its tail. The color design and the tail is the way to ID a lot of rattlesnakes.

Why do I bring this up you ask? Because its very important to make a correct ID of a rattlesnake if it bites you. The hospital will need to know what kind of anti-venom to administer and Mojave's are especially different than other rattlesnakes in the venom department. Mojave's inject a neuro toxin that is more dangerous, and time is of the essence in getting the correct anti-venom.

Notice the tail in this photo of a mojave.

http://www.blueplanetbiomes.org/mojave_rattlesnake.htm

Another link to some good photos of Mojave's

http://www.californiaherps.com/snakes/page...scutulatus.html

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Hey Earl, Thanks for posting the i.d. info for Mojave's....I had it backwards and thought that the wider black was Mojave's....I've had more encounters with them than I realized, based on the tail banding info you provided.....And, yes, the snake in the photo had more white on its tail than black and it's pattern did fade toward the tail...I didn't get close enough to count it's face scales...And probably never will!!!!! :Huh_anim]: Cheers, Unc

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Hi Ron I've seen those pink rattlers at RH and I always thought they were pink mohaves also--I also seen a rattle snake at RH unlike any I've ever seen he looked kinda tiger striped and was really fast at getting away from me :tisc-tisc: Hey about your cleaned out patch---have 4000 will travel and you know I live by the code---see no--hear no--speak no-- :icon_mrgreen: -Mike C... :ph34r2:

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Hey Mike...This little one matches the reddish pink ground near the Vulture....It's the first one I 've seen there of that color...All the others were either real green or dark brown....Still working the patch, figuring the lay of the gold, you know...More going on than what I post...Cheers, Unc

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Thats a Tiger and they are not very aggressive. BTW the tail banding is not a reliable way to determine species as it can be very different in two snakes from the same birthing. Only one for sure way to tell a Mohave from a Western (or Western subspecies) and you have to look close to do it. A Mohave's eyes will be connected with two large scales only. http://www.californiaherps.com/snakes/imag...eadcubriggs.jpg Others will have many smaller scales between the eyes.

Tigers in AZ are also somewhat limited in their range and extent and with a good close up of one I bet I could darn near pin point where you saw it. They have localized oddities to their concentrated groups such as bandings near the tail overlapping or wrapping the entire body.

When we used to hunt them the ones near Rich Hill brought more money than others.

Also, they drop their young around late July and into August so its doubtful they would be showing young yet. Just a very healthy snake.

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Hi LL the tiger striped rattler I seen at RH was real exotic lookin with like calico colors and super fast-maybe it was a super rattler :laught16: --what kinda rattler was that :hmmmmmm: Ron I was just jokin with you--well maybe just a little :innocent0002: -Mike C... :ph34r2:

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:Huh_anim]: Ifn'ya really want to see a monster 125+++lbs Georgia rattler pic , it's at Pioneer Mining in Auburn Kalif and THAT thing is a MONSTER :tisc-tisc: !!!!! Short stubby bad tempered timber rattlers and sidewinders give me the creeps,before they die!!John

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I just heard yesterday that a guy got bit by a Mojave in Stanton the other day. I was told he was bitten on the hand and may lose it if he survives. He is now in the hospital and in bad shape, according to my source. Anybody else hear of this?

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:Huh_anim]: Ifn'ya really want to see a monster 125+++lbs Georgia rattler pic , it's at Pioneer Mining in Auburn Kalif and THAT thing is a MONSTER :tisc-tisc: !!!!! Short stubby bad tempered timber rattlers and sidewinders give me the creeps,before they die!!John

There are NO rattlesnakes weighing anywhere near 125 lbs and never have been. Eastern Diamondbacks are the heaviest bodied pit viper in North America (and the world I think) and an 8 footer will only weigh 20 lbs which is a huge specimen and very rare.

Class: Reptilia (Reptiles)

Genus: Crotalus and Sistrurus, with Crotalus species being the largest

and most widespread

Length: Largest—eastern diamondback Crotalus adamanteus at up to 8

feet (2.4 meters); smallest—ridge-nosed rattlesnake Crotalus willardi

at 12 inches long (30.5 centimeters). Most species are 24 to 48 inches

long (61 to 122 centimeters).

Weight: eastern diamondback—4 to 10 pounds (1.8 to 4.5 kilograms);

ridge-nosed rattlesnake—3 to 4 ounces (85 to 113 grams)

The eastern diamondback rattlesnake is the largest venomous snake in North America.

More recently, snake expert G.H. Dalrymple listed one of the rattlers

in his research area in Everglades National Park at 94.1 inches and 20

pounds. (You do the math on that 94.1 inches. I'd mess it up. OK, OK.

It's just under 8 feet.) "That's an absolutely giant eastern

diamondback," he says.

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