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Fayetteville N.C. Finds. 28Feb2008


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I found these bad boys in fayetteville not really tryin but more or less startin at the ground while on my cellphone.

An Iron and a chondrite i believe. You be the judges.

Iron2.jpg

Iron4.jpg

Here it is with my set-up. A 9 Grammer.

MyEquipment1.jpg

Here's the Chondrite(?) It Weighed 9.3 Grams

Stone2.jpg

Any thoughts?

Rocco

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Rocco:

Did you by any chance do a streak test on the specimen?

Steve

As a matter of fact I did. Neither left a streak, they just scratched the porcelain. :confused0013:

I'm thinking of cutting and etching the iron to get a better idea on what I'm dealing with. I'll get back to you all on that. :innocent0002:

Rocco

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It's always hard to tell something from a picture Rocco. So I'm going to take this opportunity and help you out by educating you a little bit on meteorites.

Buy the "Rocks From Space" book and read it cover to cover (I'd suggest getting it from Bill since his forum is free for you)-

Rocks From Space

The scratch test is a good test, however another one that will help is figuring out the density. Weigh it, then use a graduated cylinder to figure out the volume and divide the weight by the volume, then compare it to this chart (by the way this is a good website to help with meteorite identification)-

Meteorite Density

To see a really good example of fusion crust, have a look at Mikes most recent find-

Mikes Find

Most meteorites have nickel in them, so there is a test kit you can get to test for nickel (though I've read this isn't a very reliable test)-

Allertest Ni Kit

Have a look at the at the Meteoritical Societies Database to see what meteorites have been classified from your state. Do a "places" search for "North Carolina"-

Meteoritical Societies Database

This database lists all the classified meteorites. Notice that there are only 30 records for North Carolina, 30% of the finds were witnessed falls and the last classification from there was in 1934.

Of course the whole "magnetic" test has to be mentioned because most meteorites contain iron and nickel, so they will be attracted to a magnet.

Here's what the exterior of a chondrite looks like-

Texture2.jpg

Here's what the interior of a fractured chondrite looks like-

Texture1.jpg

Here's what a chondrite looks like when a "window" has been filed into it.

Chondrules.jpg

See the little metal flecks?

One thing I would suggest to really help you out is to head to one of your local musuems that have a meteorite display. Trust me, this will help you out a lot.

I hope all this helps you out with your meteorite hunting efforts.

Del

BTW- That button you found is a cool find, congrats!

*** Had to go back and edit my original post a little because I was off on some of the information (thanks Jim). Dang I've still got a lot to learn! :shrug:

Here's another link to help with meteorite identification-

Meteorite Identification

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It's always hard to tell something from a picture Rocco. So I'm going to take this opportunity and help you out by educating you a little bit on meteorites.

Buy the "Rocks From Space" book and read it cover to cover (I'd suggest getting it from Bill since his forum is free for you)-

Rocks From Space

The scratch test is a good test, however another one that will help is figuring out the density. Weigh it, then use a graduated cylinder to figure out the volume and divide the weight by the volume, then compare it to this chart (by the way this is a good website to help with meteorite identification)-

Meteorite Density

To see a really good example of fusion crust, have a look at Mikes most recent find-

Mikes Find

Most meteorites have nickel in them, so there is a test kit you can get to test for nickel (though I've read this isn't a very reliable test)-

Allertest Ni Kit

Have a look at the at the Meteoritical Societies Database to see what meteorites have been classified from your state. Do a "places" search for "North Carolina"-

Meteoritical Societies Database

This database lists all the classified meteorites. Notice that there are only 30 records for North Carolina, 30% of the finds were witnessed falls and the last classification from there was in 1934.

Of course the whole "magnetic" test has to be mentioned because most meteorites contain iron and nickel, so they will be attracted to a magnet.

Here's what the exterior of a chondrite looks like-

Texture2.jpg

Here's what the interior of a fractured chondrite looks like-

Texture1.jpg

Here's what a chondrite looks like when a "window" has been filed into it.

Chondrules.jpg

See the little metal flecks?

One thing I would suggest to really help you out is to head to one of your local musuems that have a meteorite display. Trust me, this will help you out a lot.

I hope all this helps you out with your meteorite hunting efforts.

Del

BTW- That button you found is a cool find, congrats!

*** Had to go back and edit my original post a little because I was off on some of the information (thanks Jim). Dang I've still got a lot to learn! :shrug:

Here's another link to help with meteorite identification-

Meteorite Identification

Well, I know all the basics. I have no Nickle test kit, and I will send the specimens in, but I wanted to get some feedback from people who are really into meteorites, and have seen many different types first hand, so I would get an idea of whether it's a good idea or wasting my time to send my specimens.

So what do you think? I know they are just pictures, but I'd love any feedback.

Rocco

Thanks guys!

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Rocco, personally, I'd keep it and not send it in, unless you had a bigger piece. Remember, 20% or 20 grams whichever is larger for classification. So, with that being said, I'd grind a side and see what the inside looks like, then maybe, slight maybe have it classified. Again, just my :twocents: . Jason :;):

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Well, I know all the basics. I have no Nickle test kit, and I will send the specimens in, but I wanted to get some feedback from people who are really into meteorites, and have seen many different types first hand, so I would get an idea of whether it's a good idea or wasting my time to send my specimens.

So what do you think? I know they are just pictures, but I'd love any feedback.

Rocco

Thanks guys!

Hi Rocco, it's always hard to tell from a picture, but sorry most likely those aren't meteorites. But hey at least you're selecting rocks that look kind of like them and thats a start.

Del

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