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Like to know if anyone has used the Tesoro Lobo Super Traq here in AZ and what they thought about it. Did it handle heavy mineralization ok and did it detect small nugs and what kind of depth performance did it have.

I know the Minelab SD2100 & 2200 are better but don't have that kind of money so I want to learn more about the lobo.

P.S.

Popped this little nug out of a crevice today. My crappy Scorpion didn't even pick it up.

post-7711-1204504245_thumb.jpg

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Hi OldSalt.....I've owned both the Lobo Super Trac and the Minelab XT17000/18000.....

both are fantastic VLF's.....the Minelabs have several frequency selections which can be of help

if you know your machine and take the time to test.....both machines have auto-trac/ground balance

I think the Lobo tracs a little fast than the ML.....

the Lobo is definitely a lighter machine....

there are more after market coils for the ML than the Lobo.....

ML's have a rechargeable battery pack that I like....don't know about the Lobo...

The Lobo has a life time warranty and they stand behind it....the ML usually is one year(?) but if

your considering a used unit then the ML warranty doesn't apply.....

Happy hunting and good luck......

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I am really impressed from what I hear of the GB2 and it's sensitivity to small gold but I think the ground in Arizona might really give it a hard time. So far the Lobo seems the best bet for a detector in that price range. I have heard mixed reviews on the White's GMT. I started out with a radio shack detector, then bought a Garrett Scorpion Stinger and despise it. I'm trying to be really cautious about the next detector I purchase.

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Aloha,

I started with a Lobo super Traq because of the warranty issues. Had some great finds out in Hawaii and in Arizona on several trips. I eventually sold it and moved on to a GMT because i wanted to hunt for gold and meteorites and saw a LOT of others using it with great success. Dang nab it, I should have got the GMT sooner! Now that i have one with the Goldmax Sierra coil I am really finding some awesome meteorites both big and small. You just need to figure out what you will be using the MD for and but one on that premise.

If you have any doubts about the GMT post them on this forum so we can figure out what the issue might be. Who knows, it may be something that can be resolved in a minute. You just have to ask!

Good luck with your decision.

Aloha,

Stan aka Kaimi

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I would not dismiss a GB2 as unable to deal with AZ mineralization. Unlike its predecessor, the GB2 has a number of setting options that enable the user to adjust to a wide range of mineralization. It just takes a while to get used to the controls. If you are lucky enough to find a used GB2 on the market with a small search coil, you could do a lot worse by passing up the opportunity. The small coil GB2 is particularly attractive to a person who is comfortable just relying on zip-zip sound differences (not separate tones, bells or whistles) and prefers a durable, super lightweight rig. Good luck in snagging a good machine.

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I would not dismiss a GB2 as unable to deal with AZ mineralization. Unlike its predecessor, the GB2 has a number of setting options that enable the user to adjust to a wide range of mineralization. It just takes a while to get used to the controls. If you are lucky enough to find a used GB2 on the market with a small search coil, you could do a lot worse by passing up the opportunity. The small coil GB2 is particularly attractive to a person who is comfortable just relying on zip-zip sound differences (not separate tones, bells or whistles) and prefers a durable, super lightweight rig. Good luck in snagging a good machine.

Micro, I was thinking the 10" coil might be a good choice since it is sort of the middle of the road size for the machine. Can still find small stuff but has some depth. What do you think?

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the standard coil will find small stuff but the small coil will find specks you can't weigh unless you have a powder scale...fractions of a grain is what I am speaking of...480 grains to a troy oz...

The GB2 is very capable but it is not a multi-purpose machine for most people...

Fred

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The GB2 10" coil, to my mind, does not add sufficient depth or other advantages that compensate for the increased weight and clunkiness. The 6.5" coil enables you to get in between the tight rocky places close to where nuggets can hide. It can penetrate more easily close to the core stems of creosote bushes or other desert plants that sometimes yield an overlooked nugget. And when it comes to pinpointing, smaller is better. However, if the sole issue is how much ground can be covered, then naturally the larger coil holds a big advantage. And that may be a very important consideration to a fellow with only one detector.

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Old Salt,

I used to run a GB and then the GBll, still have the GBll. It's a good machine, wouldnt be without it.

I have worked many many place's in Az. with it and yes, sometimes you will come across an area that you cannot work with it. I then switch to the ML3500 with the mono coil and if the ground is still to noisy I will switch to a DD coil. With that combo I can work just about any area.

I probably have that a little backwards, as I usually hunt with the ML, but once in awhile I get lazy and hunt with the GBll.

If I find a crumb patch I stick with the GB as it will pick up very small stuff. I have weighed gold down to 1/10 of one grain that I have found with it. I suspect that some was smaller, however I don't bother to weight that stuff anymore.

I also have the 10 inch coil and there is a bit more depth but not much. As micro said, you can cover a lot more ground with it and it will also find very small gold. With the 10" coil you will probably notice a bit more depth on the larger nuggets than with the 6" coil.

Bob T.

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Ah heck Bob, I gotta throw my :twocents: into this one. The Lobo ST is a very easy VLF detector to understand. I own one, and it didn't take long for me to learn of it's capabilities.

It will find gold as well as many other things, coins etc. depending on the settings you input. But, as with any VLF detector target depth is limited. My best finds were at the 8 to 10 inch range in depth.

Not a plug for Tesoro here, just an oppinion!

Gary

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I've had my GB2 for many years and when it starts having trouble I whip out the good old LOBO and finish off the trouble spots. I just use a 2 poker chip system-good target white--pain in the arse area red,to denote to rerun the area. I REALLY like the smallest coils in both but them teeny tiny specks of gold can drive ya mad in a dry climate. I'm strictly a volume person with a sluice box to do the work for me. I'll chip mark 20-30 targets and throw them all in a bucket and dump in a box. I can work many HUNDREDS of hits that way in a very short time too. Tons au 2 u2 -John :twocents:

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The Tersoro is made in AZ, so, the short answer is "yes", it can handle the mineralization. The trick is finding someone with experience on the machine that is willing to take you out and teach you the basic settings on the machine and what is "normal". Personally, I'd take a LOBO over GBII any day, but it depends on where you're hunting and how much mineralization you have to deal with. If you're hunting washes with little iron, go with the BGII, it'll find crumbs. If push came to shove, I'd choose the ML Erueka since you can switch freqs on it. Gotta remember, the Lobo is 19 khz, the GBII is 71, the ML is 60, 20, AND 6.4 khz. What that all means is, the higher the khz, the more sensitive it is to small gold, but the bad thing with that is the more sensitive to gold, the more sensitive to mineralization. With the ML, you can choose what freq you are running in to optimize what depth you're hoping to get. I haven't found any gold with the GBII that I couldn't find with the Eureka in 60khz. Thing is, you can read all these comments on here and hear about everyone's personal experience with each machine but the bottom line is for you to just call Bill and let him tell you what's what. I promise he won't steer you wrong.

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The Tersoro is made in AZ, so, the short answer is "yes", it can handle the mineralization. The trick is finding someone with experience on the machine that is willing to take you out and teach you the basic settings on the machine and what is "normal". Personally, I'd take a LOBO over GBII any day, but it depends on where you're hunting and how much mineralization you have to deal with. If you're hunting washes with little iron, go with the BGII, it'll find crumbs. If push came to shove, I'd choose the ML Erueka since you can switch freqs on it. Gotta remember, the Lobo is 19 khz, the GBII is 71, the ML is 60, 20, AND 6.4 khz. What that all means is, the higher the khz, the more sensitive it is to small gold, but the bad thing with that is the more sensitive to gold, the more sensitive to mineralization. With the ML, you can choose what freq you are running in to optimize what depth you're hoping to get. I haven't found any gold with the GBII that I couldn't find with the Eureka in 60khz. Thing is, you can read all these comments on here and hear about everyone's personal experience with each machine but the bottom line is for you to just call Bill and let him tell you what's what. I promise he won't steer you wrong.

The Eureka does sound intersting. I would think at 19khz the Tesoro would have a tough time finding anything small. The Stinger is 15khz and pass right over small nugs and still has a heck of a time with minerlization. I heard the Eureka does not have a waterproof coil. Know if this is true? Also the Tesoro has some type of auto ground balance. Does the Eureka have this?

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Hi,

Had to make a few comments as I'm an old fan of VLF units. But a rule first - I'm only going to discuss units already mentioned.

First off, we are talking mostly about Dave Johnson units. Dave was the engineer behind the Lobo, Gold Bug 2, and GMT. The Eureka is a Minelab design.

So that said, the units are more alike than different when it comes to gold nuggets. Forget brand names, think engineer. The Gold Bug 2 at 71 kHz is hot on small gold but has extremely poor depth in mineralized ground on larger nuggets. The worst I've tested. But if you are into shallow or small it is the greatest. In low mineral ground it does not suffer this limitation as much.

The Lobo at 17.5 kHz is much more tolerant of high mineral ground and has better depth on larger gold than the GB2 under those conditions. And it is still pretty hot on small gold, although not as good as a GB2.

I'm not swearing this for everywhere, but I've found the 48 kHz GMT to have the best balance of small gold sensitivity and depth on large gold compared to the Lobo and GB2. The GMT will hit gold nearly as small as a GB2 and gold as deep as a Lobo in bad ground.

The exception is super bad hot rocks. The GB2 and Lobo both have silent search disc modes that can tune out many iron hot rocks and still hit gold. The GMT was built to be safe, and so sounds on all targets. It does use tones, so most hot rocks sound like iron, but it gets pretty noisy in bad ground. You have to listen to a ton of iron tones hoping to get a gold tone. It really is the safer system but tiring if the hot rocks are too thick.

The Eureka in my opinion is a 20 khz machine that can be switched to 60 kHz or 6.4 kHz. It works best at 20 khz. I can hit a smaller nugget with a 48 kHz GMT than a 60 kHz Eureka. It is a good unit, but heavy and overly expensive. Still, a good unit for gold in highly mineralized ground.

The bottom line is they are all good. So how to decide?

Here is how.

1. Only the GB2, Lobo, and Eureka can be hip or chest mounted. Is that important to you?

2. Only the Lobo has a full range variable discrimination control. You can coin, jewelry, or coin hunt with it. Is that important to you?

3. The Eureka coil is not warrantied as waterproof. All the rest are. is that important to you?

4. The Eureka can run a 15" round Coiltek WOT coil at 6.4 kHz that sucks on small gold but is good on really large nuggets or coins and jewelry on a beach. Is that important to you?

5. The Lobo, Eureka, and GMT can all automatically ground balance. The GB2 cannot. Is that important to you?

6.The GB2 and GMT can manually ground balance. Is that important to you?

7. Only the GMT can both manually and automatically gound balance. It also can run in manual but because it always tracks, can be set to a proper ground balance while in manual with the push of a button. Like the GP 3500 did many years later. Is that important to you?

8. Only the GMT has an LCD meter that gives you an iron probability. The other units are "yes/no" units that decide for you by beeping if they think it is gold, and no sound if they think it is iron. The GMT always makes a sound, and shows you the probability. YOU decide. Is that important to you?

9. The Eureka and GB2 have very poor coil selections. The GMT is not much better. The Lobo has a superb selection of accessory coils. Is that important to you?

10. Only the Lobo comes with a lifetime warranty - and Tesoro backs it!

There is more, but I have a show to watch! Personally, I think the Tesoro Lobo SuperTraq looks pretty darn good. Good general overall sensitivity, waterproof coils, great coil selection, can hip or chest mount, good price, reasonable weight, lifetime warranty, all metal prospect mode and full range disc mode and beach mode, good hot rock handling, easy to operate.

So I find it hard to see how a person who wants a new unit under $1000 can go wrong with the Tesoro. Second place, you decide. It all depends on how you answer all those questions. The answer I get is not the same as yours.

I'm been favoring the GMT as of late. I want to hit tiny gold, but I'm not willing to give up the depth on larger gold that the GB2 imposes on me. The iron disc sytem, while a pain in hot rocks, is more nuanced and less likely to lose gold. And I really like being able to either manually ground balance or run in tracking. That is a feature unique to the GMT of the units mentioned. Again, however, I'm just illustrating how my needs reflect on my choice of a unit. They are all good.

Units not mentioned but should have been - White's MXT and Minelab X-Terra 70.

There are no good detectors, only good detectorists!

Steve Herschbach

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Steve, I think that is an excellent reply and offers a lot of good insight and has helped me with making a decision. If possible, tell me a little bit about the Garret Scorpion Gold Stinger. Also, have you ever tested the Garret Infinuim or GTI 2500?

I am leaning towards the Tesoro now and will continue to use my Falcon in the crevices.

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Hi Old Salt,

Well, the short answer is that the Stinger is way overdue for an update. It has only a single accessory coil available, and the battery replacement scheme is a nightmare. You do not see many in use as nugget hunters.

The GTI is a coin machine. It will hit a nugget if it is big enough, but so will an Ace 150 for far less money.

The Infinium is a different beast. Garrett tried to have it both ways with the Infinium, and it is seeing more use these days as a beach and water hunting unit than for nugget detecting. It is not a bad little unit but poor on small gold. Unless you had severe mineralization it does not offer anything to advise it over the Lobo. The Minelab SD units are better than the Infinium, but compared to a new SD2100v2 the Infinium is half the price. If you were looking at PI units on a budget a used SD2100 would be a possible option.

The more choices you look at the more confusing it gets. You really would not get hurt with the Lobo, and it would allow you to discover whether you really are going to get into this nugget detecting stuff at a reasonable cost. If it really floats your boat you can upgrade later.

Some would advise that if you are going to do it, just get the best, or do not bother. The theory is that by not having the best you cut your chances for success and will lose interest. Nice theory for those with deep pockets. Rest assured plenty of gold gets found with VLF units, and if you can't find even a speck of gold with a VLF than a more expensive unit will probably not make much difference. The true game is in putting yourself on good ground and knowing whatever machine you have. If you persevere and find you really are into nugget hunting, you can always upgrade later.

Steve Herschbach

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Steve;

It is good to have you posting here. You have a unique point of view and vast experience to share.

BTW, Old Salt, this is the Steve @ Alaska Gold Forum that I referred you to at the beginning of this thread..in case you did not know...

Fred

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Hi Old Salt,

Well, the short answer is that the Stinger is way overdue for an update. It has only a single accessory coil available, and the battery replacement scheme is a nightmare. You do not see many in use as nugget hunters.

The GTI is a coin machine. It will hit a nugget if it is big enough, but so will an Ace 150 for far less money.

The Infinium is a different beast. Garrett tried to have it both ways with the Infinium, and it is seeing more use these days as a beach and water hunting unit than for nugget detecting. It is not a bad little unit but poor on small gold. Unless you had severe mineralization it does not offer anything to advise it over the Lobo. The Minelab SD units are better than the Infinium, but compared to a new SD2100v2 the Infinium is half the price. If you were looking at PI units on a budget a used SD2100 would be a possible option.

The more choices you look at the more confusing it gets. You really would not get hurt with the Lobo, and it would allow you to discover whether you really are going to get into this nugget detecting stuff at a reasonable cost. If it really floats your boat you can upgrade later.

Some would advise that if you are going to do it, just get the best, or do not bother. The theory is that by not having the best you cut your chances for success and will lose interest. Nice theory for those with deep pockets. Rest assured plenty of gold gets found with VLF units, and if you can't find even a speck of gold with a VLF than a more expensive unit will probably not make much difference. The true game is in putting yourself on good ground and knowing whatever machine you have. If you persevere and find you really are into nugget hunting, you can always upgrade later.

Steve Herschbach

Steve really good info and presented in a way that is easy to understand. Thanks.

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Steve;

It is good to have you posting here. You have a unique point of view and vast experience to share.

BTW, Old Salt, this is the Steve @ Alaska Gold Forum that I referred you to at the beginning of this thread..in case you did not know...

Fred

Thanks, I tried to find him on the net when you mentioned that.

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Just want to let you know I picked up a new Lobo Super Traq yesterday. Thanks for all the advice.

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