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Hi folks,

I've been wanting to give this forum a try for a while, a couple years actually. I finally decided to register last night.

I'm in Colorado where all the flu is spreading like wildfire. Hopefully I won't pass it on to anyone on this forum.

I claim to be a meteorite hunter but the degree of my success is still to be determined.

My wife takes care of her mother so we can't travel much, as there would be no one else to take care of her. So, I hunt in the local area but am not complaining there a bit. Family first.

I use a magnet to hunt with and although that seems to be somewhat of a controversial method, I am none-the-less having fun doing it. I enjoy pretty much all things to do with meteorites and learning about their origins. Along with that I am learning about earth rocks and minerals.

I'm also into gold prospecting but since I can't travel as much these days, meteorites have my attention more now. I have been trying to teach myself everything I can about all things meteoritic and have actively been hunting both for close to 5 years now.

Hello to you all, hope you have room for one more on here.

Mike in CO

aka Rockbiter

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Hi Mike,

Welcome to the forum. I have seen many places in Colorado that would be good for hunting meteorites, so you've probably got your hands full. Maybe you could post a story and photos of one of your hunts, we'd love to see em'. Good Luck, Ben

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Thanks guys. I appreciate the welcome.

Because of the hunting style I have used, my finds are quite small. As a result of their size, showing them to someone else becomes a bit of a problem so I put a camera on my low-power microscope and have been taking a few pictures. I have to be up front though, none of the little finds have been authenticated. So, I consider them as suspect stones only. One day possibly I will have someone in the know take a look at them. Since I don't deal in meteorites nor do I buy them, having these little guys just the way they are is fine by me at this point. They give me enjoyment just the same as if they were in the books. Hope all that makes sense.

This picture I took with the camera against the eyepiece of the scope a couple years ago. I have since recovered a total of 9 pieces (inlcuding these pieces) from at least two separate falls of this same material. A couple pieces were found about 60 miles from the rest. Again, these are suspect stones only.

IMG_0103.jpg

this picture I took with the camera mounted on the scope and it is one of the pieces I was referring to.

winter08_7.jpg

I won't bore you with anymore for now.

Thanks again for the responses

Mike

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Welome to the forum Mike. This is a great forum to learn about meteorite hunting.

Any particular reason why your trying to be so secretive? Sorry I really don't have a clue what your trying to refer to with your subtle hints. :shrug:

Del

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Hi Del,

Sorry, I wasn't trying to be secretive or use subtleties, at least I didn't think I was. I'll gladly share any info I have on hunting and all that. It's just that my finds are small and I didn't want to start out on the forum being a bore. Actually, I'm hoping I can learn lots from you all about meteorites and hunting techniques.

Mike

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Mike, there have been a number of articles written about micro-meteorites, so you stand as good a chance of finding some as anyone...and they are just as likely on your roof...the problem is identifying them, as you have already learned...read all you can, visit some museum displays and come to an outing sometime...plenty of good people willing to help you.

Where in Colorado are you located?

Fred

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Hi Fred,

I am outside of Montrose, which is in the southwest part. I can't believe it, the snow is going away here. I'm still sick as a dog with this flu but as soon as I get up steam again, I'll be back out there. Seems like the cold weather lasted a little longer this winter. I'm plenty tired of winter that is for sure.

I did get a new set of magnets this winter and made up a new rake. Check it out. I've had it out a couple times in the mud, thus the mud all over it. I'm anxious to give it a real test somewhere.

IMG_0579.jpg

Mike

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Hi Mike,

Welcome to the forum. I have seen many places in Colorado that would be good for hunting meteorites, so you've probably got your hands full. Maybe you could post a story and photos of one of your hunts, we'd love to see em'. Good Luck, Ben

Hi Ben,

I have no real recordings of any hunts so-to-speak, as I have mostly hunted with a magnet cane wherever I have taken walks. Just a shop magnet on a stick with a couple square NDIB supermagnets on the bottom. After i drug the thing for a while, I stripped the magnetized pebbles off and put them in a bucket. When I had time later on, I sat down and went through those bits. So it is really hard to say exactly where the particlular bits come from. I have been all over with that thing. It takes a lot of dragging my cane to make a 1/4th of a 5-gallon bucket of these little pebbles. If I get into a particularly interesting area sometime, I will inspect the magnetized pieces more often. My luck don't normally run that I would stumble onto a strewn field. For me, that would be like my trying to win the lottery. But if I persevere long enough, who knows.

Here is a picture of one particular little stone that I picked up during a summer camping trip. It is so barely magnetic that it will roll off my supermagnet. I'll never know how but I found it on top of all the other pebbles that had stuck to the magnet after dragging it all over the place in several different locations. That was over along the Arkansas River somewhere by Buena Vista is the best i can offer on the location.

It is nosecone shaped. The point or nose of the cone is to the right in the picture with the trailing edge to the left. Part of the wide bell part has broken away while yet in flight as some additional melting has taken place on the broken surfaces. It is a grey-brown color. Total length is not over 1/4".

That is about the closest thing to an actual hunt story that I have. I'll work on that though. Just as soon as I get to feeling better again. (flu)

Mike

2007_s6.jpg

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Mike, welcome to the forum. There is a little book called, "Meteorites of the United States" that has listed the falls in the US and CO. has 73 of them listed. So, the chances are pretty good of finding them. Have you taken and ground a "window" on any of them? Since they stick to a magnet, a window should show some metal, but then again, just because they stick to a magnet doesn't mean they are meteorites. Good luck and keep the photos coming. BTW, interesting little "meteorite grabber". That would probably work pretty good on the dry lakes of the SW. Again, welcome. Jason :;):

P.S. another great book, if you don't already have it is, "Rocks from Space" by O. Richard Norton.

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Mike, welcome to the forum. There is a little book called, "Meteorites of the United States" that has listed the falls in the US and CO. has 73 of them listed. So, the chances are pretty good of finding them. Have you taken and ground a "window" on any of them? Since they stick to a magnet, a window should show some metal, but then again, just because they stick to a magnet doesn't mean they are meteorites. Good luck and keep the photos coming. BTW, interesting little "meteorite grabber". That would probably work pretty good on the dry lakes of the SW. Again, welcome. Jason :;):

P.S. another great book, if you don't already have it is, "Rocks from Space" by O. Richard Norton.

Hi Jason,

Thanks for extending the welcome. My wife bought both Dr. Norton's books for me. So I have those and they are excellent. I got my idea for hunting with magnets from those books actually. I have a few books on rocks and minerals too to help me with identifying them. I've read them all so much they are about all worn out. The covers are curled and pages are loose.

It's tough to grind on some of these itty bitty stones specially for an old duffer like me with poor eyesight and fingers that don't work so good anymore with little things. I have sanded a couple larger suspect stones that ended up in my not a meteorite pile. Some I will never attempt to cut into as that would surely detract from what I like about them. Once not too long ago, one kind person suggested that I should grind on the ugly side. You know, I have never figured out which is supposed to be the ugly side of a meteorite. : )

My newly built rake has three 80 mm Sq x 10 mm thick NDIB supermagnets on it. That was way scary working with such powerful magnets. That's the reason I chose the wing shape to attach them to just so I could keep them way far apart. After building it and then studying it a while, I have determined that I could possibly move the outside ones in an inch or so. I may do that because there is a pretty good gap between them and the track of the middle one. Course they seldom drag in a straight line on that thing anyway so maybe it's no big thing.

Here is my recipe for building a rake like that: Tear the guts out of an electrical control box so that you end up with some weird shaped piece of plastic and use that for the body. Drill holes in each end of it and poke an axle through it. Tear the handle out of an old cordless Shark sweeper, drill a hole through the bottom end of it. Make sure when you are running the axle through the body, to also run it through the hole in the handle that you run down through a hole in the weird piece of plastic. Take two wheels off a walker and attach to the axle, one on each side. (gotta save those wheels, as I am probably going to need the walker someday soon). Then cut up a piece of heavy belting to fasten to the body and let curve back down to the ground to attach the magnets to. Pray you don't loose your concentration while trying to separate three supermagnets from each other and the metal shielded box they come in. Get three hinges and J-B Weld each of the magnets to one side of each hinge. Very carefully attach the hinges to the belting. Wallah! You got a rake. Be prepared though, everything was cheap until it came to the magnets. (Trying to use regular hand tools to tighten the bolts there close to the magnets was fun)

The second picture I posted in this thread showing a little dark suspect iron by itself, I found using this rake on its maiden run through some gravels.

Mike

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Hi Mike,

I hope you're feeling better now. I've been to Montrose a few times coming up from Ouray via Ridgeway, etc. I have even been to the metal detector dealer there in Montrose, too. That's a nice magnetic rake, and should be able to pick up any meteorites in it's path. Hang in there, spring is just around the corner.

Ben

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Mike, welcome to the forum. There is a little book called, "Meteorites of the United States" that has listed the falls in the US and CO. has 73 of them listed. So, the chances are pretty good of finding them.

Hi Jason,

The Colorado count is up to 84 confirmed and approved now (according to the MetBull database), and there are 2 that are awaiting approval. I've created a website for Colorado meteorites (actually the Colorado Meteorite Society) and they are listed if anyone wants to take a look.

http://www.peaktopeak.com/comets/cometeorites.htm

Click on either of the two list links on that page to see the actual lists. I think the "List by Classification" list looks pretty cool, but I'm a little biased. :-) Then click on the name of a meteorite to go to its page.

Most of the pages don't have a lot of information yet, but each meteorite page has a link to its corresponding MetBull database entry. And many of the pages have photos. The rest of the website is a "work in progress". We are hoping this website will become the place to go if anyone wants to know about Colorado meteorites. Oh, and this is just a temporary location to park the website until we get our own website domain, so I would expect it to be a different website address in a couple months.

Regards,

Bob Loeffler

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If you wouldn't mind, I would like to get some information from you on membership in the COMETS. Is that information posted someplace?

Hi Mike,

Membership in the COMETS is very "loose". There are no membership dues because there are no newsletters or expenses to the club. Field trips are at each members expense. For monthly meetings, we either meet at a member's house or at a public location that doesn't charge us. All you need to do is join our group on Yahoo Groups and you are basically a member. :-) Or, start coming to meetings. That would be difficult for you because you live so far away, so you should just join the group. All events are announced on the forum and we are starting to put them in the Calendar which is a feature on the forum. A couple people have put pictures in the gallery section of the forum. I'm hoping some people will want to put pictures on the website. As we get bigger, maybe we will start charging dues. Or maybe we have and I just don't know it yet. :-) Probably not.

Regards,

Bob

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