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Paleface

New Classification for Franconia

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only 3 million more irons to classify till we convince the blind and the stubborn.

[Erik]

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Hi Guys:

I asked a question sometime ago about whether it was possible to have more then one classification from a single fall. Now I see where we have 12 different classifications in a small area. :hmmmmmm: Whether it's from a single fall or a twelve separate falls, something very unusual happened. Is this the "Bermuda Triangle" of meteorite strewnfields? :;):

Steve

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Thanks Jim, if I understand correctly...you are saying that there has been several different falls over time rather than one big fall with diverse material mixed in? I wonder why that would be so obvious in Franconia but the Gold Basins are mostly from one fall...if my factoids are correct....yes, I know a couple of others were found but they appear to be singles...

More speculation; perhaps the eddy currents of our solar system, galaxy and even the Universe have predictable patterns where the flotsam and jetsom of space congregates...Franconia for instance???????

Fred

Fred,

The following is just my opinion based upon what I have read and observed.

Actually it is more obvious at Gold Basin, there are many more classifications and unpaired meteorites at GB than at Franconia. The area hunted at GB is much larger than the area hunted at Franconia.

I personally do not believe that there is a pattern anywhere in the world where a single given area is revisited by space debris on a given cycle. Predictable patterns with a degree of accuracy that precise would be un-thought of. The Gold Basin L4-6 is the predominate meteorite found there as there have been many pairings. There also have been L6 pairings which show that more than one meteorite put down material numbering more than a single piece. If you will read all the information in the following link, you will also notice that there has been both Low metal and High metal chondrites found at Gold Basin. The amount of each is just the reverse from Franconia, where the predominate material is High metal chondrites.

Both Gold Basin and Franconia are conducive to preserving extra terrestrial material for thousands of years.

In this link, you will also notice that there is a suggestion as to what Meteorites found at GB should be called. As I have stated before, this should also hold true at Franconia, with exception to the obvious Irons. The Low metal chondrites at Franconia are a whole different story with regards to the average hunter/gatherer, who may not be able to distinguish an L from an H. Classification is the only sure way of knowing what you have.

http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/goldbasn/gb-all.htm

Jim

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Hi Guys:

I asked a question sometime ago about whether it was possible to have more then one classification from a single fall. Now I see where we have 12 different classifications in a small area. :hmmmmmm: Whether it's from a single fall or a twelve separate falls, something very unusual happened. Is this the "Bermuda Triangle" of meteorite strewnfields? :;):

Steve

Steve,

Read my last 2 posts on this thread and digest the link on Gold Basin in my last post and you will have adequate answers to your questions. No real mystery, no bermuda triangles, no meteorite graveyards, just several major strewnfields with the average amount of other material mixed in. I would like to see a 3x7 mile area in the middle of nowhere that has the same preserving abilities as GB or Franconia, given the hunting pressure that Franconia or GB has received. I would venture to say that many individual meteorites would be found. Throw in a major fall and you have the same circumstances as Franconia or GB.

Only my humble opinion and I do not have the time to grid off a 3x7 mile area and check it out. :brows:

Jim

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Steve,

Read my last 2 posts on this thread and digest the link on Gold Basin in my last post and you will have adequate answers to your questions. No real mystery, no bermuda triangles, no meteorite graveyards, just several major strewnfields with the average amount of other material mixed in. I would like to see a 3x7 mile area in the middle of nowhere that has the same preserving abilities as GB or Franconia, given the hunting pressure that Franconia or GB has received. I would venture to say that many individual meteorites would be found. Throw in a major fall and you have the same circumstances as Franconia or GB.

Only my humble opinion and I do not have the time to grid off a 3x7 mile area and check it out. :brows:

Jim

CONGRATULATIONS JIM!

I am pleased to see that your effort has paid off.

Johnny

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Johnny,

Thanks for the congrats........

Jim

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Wow Jim, you are sharing some excellent information. Thanks!

Del

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Hi Jim and all,

Considering the tons of material that are laid down on our earth daily, Franconia may or may not be so unusual at all.

There is one thing for sure that stands out about Franconia and Gold Basin, and that is the unbelievable amount of man hours spent within the field with metal detectors. Is Franconia a extra ordinary special place. Probably not.

As Jim pointed out, almost every stone has been examined at least once so it seems. But more material is being found all the time which simply goes to show there is just no way or covering every inch of the area. The same goes for Gold Basin where there has been thousands of classified and unclassified meteorites found.

So why 12 classifications from Franconia area and probably double that amount from Gold Basin area?

There are a number of reasons. Start with the ever increasing number of meteorite hunters and growing every day. I know for sure I personally have infected a number of new meteorite hunters with the bug who found their first meteorites at Franconia and Gold Basin. And I am only one person. Consider how many Paleface, JohnB, and others have infected, and the story goes on and on from there. It's an infectious disease like "Gold Fever".

I have well over a thousand of the small irons from Franconia, with the largest one at 23.6 grams. Just figuring out how to detect them was an adventure in itself and was a learning experience that was priceless in my eyes.

My take is that the Franconia and Gold Basin has served this hobby and scientific communities well by introducing so many new people to a great hobby. For myself, it's a thrill to see the excitement on someones face when they show you their first meteorite. :icon_mrgreen:

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There are a number of reasons. Start with the ever increasing number of meteorite hunters and growing every day. I know for sure I personally have infected a number of new meteorite hunters with the bug who found their first meteorites at Franconia and Gold Basin. And I am only one person. Consider how many Paleface, JohnB, and others have infected, and the story goes on and on from there. It's an infectious disease like "Gold Fever".

Yeah Roger you infected me..... and I thank you for that! :yourock:

Del

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Roger,

You are absolutely correct on all counts. Franconia and Gold Basin have been wonderful strewnfields especially because so many new meteorite hunters were able to spark their interest in the hobby and also continue to hone their skills. The fields are well on their way to being depleted, the easy pickings are long gone and now it is taking some skill to find anything. Individuals with a desire to find their first meteorite will still be able to do that for many more years if they display the persistence that Del just did in finding his first California dry lake meteorite.

That 23.6 gram Iron that you found is one of the largest to have ever been found, I only know of eight over 16 grams.

Jim

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Del

I won't ever forget the look on your face when you found that first little Franconia iron...........priceless. That's what this is all about... :icon_mrgreen:

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Hey Jim...as always you are a fountain of information. Thank you for the GB link...I have read all I could find on GB, hence my in-correct "facts"...I certainly will read the link you provided.

Just in case someone misunderstood, I was only musing as to the reasons for the quanity of classifications at Franconia....I have read that every square mile has an average of 3-4 meteorites on it...perhaps a group outing to some high desert spot would help enlighten the facts about a given area of the correct type of ground.???

Fred

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ok guy's, it's time to get serious. While I was out hunting the Franconia field I found some bones. After a long research by alien paleontologist, they were found to be from the late alien Franconians. Stepping back a bit in time. History has found that the alien Franconians settled in the region, calling their hacienda, Franconia. While the Franconians were transversing our solar system, without their headlights on (To avoid being detected) they bounced off several of our planets and asteroids. The planetoid material accumulated on their vessel. As they approached our planet earth, they were drawn in by our gravitational pull. The gravitational pull was so great that their vessel broke apart.... The Franconians had no chose but to bail out and pop their chute's. Their vessel, braking up and scattering in the fields..... they landed safely, establishing the Franconia strewn field. This is the truth on why there is so many variations of meteoritic material found today..... fewww, glad I got that all out. This should lay to rest any further questions.... :laught16:

Doubtably, professor hawk :coffeetime:

PS: I'm out of here :outtahere:

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ALL,

Today some very interesting information was obtained by Larry Sloan, he gave me a call and we rattled this information around and we think that it just might be possible that the Franconia H5 S3 W2 that was found by John Wolfe back in 2002, just might be the meteor that shed Irons throughout its entry thru the earths atmosphere.

At least 17 different pieces have been paired with the original Franconia. The original Franconia showed rare metallic copper as did the SacW005 ungrouped Iron classification. One other bit of evidence is the fact that the Fayolite composition of the two is almost identical.

I have leaned more toward the Buck Mountain Wash classification as having been the mother to all these irons, but since getting back the classification on the Irons and in light of this newly obtained information, we may be a little closer to solving the mystery. The Buck Mountain Wash meteorite has a 25.1 fayolite content and has had at least 3 pairings. It shows large metallic inclusions as does the Franconia. It may also be possible that both these meteors shed out irons upon entry.

I will try to keep those that have an interest, updated on any findings.

Jim

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And the mystery of this strewn field just keeps on getting stranger and stranger. This thing may go on forever at this rate.

I sure hope that somewhere, someone comes up with some sort of conclusive answer. BUT it sure does make for an interesting story I can tell my non-hunting friends.Until then I will just keep on bringing in them spacerocks and adding them to my collection.

Aloha,

Stan aka Kaimi

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And the mystery of this strewn field just keeps on getting stranger and stranger. This thing may go on forever at this rate.

I sure hope that somewhere, someone comes up with some sort of conclusive answer. BUT it sure does make for an interesting story I can tell my non-hunting friends.Until then I will just keep on bringing in them spacerocks and adding them to my collection.

Aloha,

Stan aka Kaimi

Stan,

:coffeetime:

The only thing getting stranger and stranger, is some of the answers being given when conclusive evidence is given.

:eee:

Jim

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Jim, I am always interested in learning and getting up-dates regarding Franconia or anywhere else. As has been proven many times, the truth is not always believed nor is the truth desired by all...the subject does not matter it is just the way humans are. That is why sayings like "don't cast your pearls..." exist.

I went to the link you gave me and learned some stuff but does the owner of that site know many of his links to pictures go to unrelated sites?

I hope your Mother is improving and things are well with you.

Fred

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Jim, I am always interested in learning and getting up-dates regarding Franconia or anywhere else. As has been proven many times, the truth is not always believed nor is the truth desired by all...the subject does not matter it is just the way humans are. That is why sayings like "don't cast your pearls..." exist.

I went to the link you gave me and learned some stuff but does the owner of that site know many of his links to pictures go to unrelated sites?

I hope your Mother is improving and things are well with you.

Fred

Fred,

You got that right about the sayings, and information given is not always understood by all.

http://humanities.byu.edu/elc/student/idio...fore_swine.html

The owner of that site can be found at the bottom end of the scroll, I have not clicked on all the pictures, but just did and noticed some advertizing here and there. :laught16:

I do not care to comment on the owner of that site, other than to say that he is well known in the meteorite community.

Thanks for the well wishes.

Jim

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Thanks to Jim's map and Rogers pointy finger I too got the fever at Franconia. I think you

both for that. Every time I'm there I have a good time and get plenty of exercise even if it's

a near skunk for the day. Thanks also to Jason and Wayne for their tips. --Perry--

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Hello Perry

You and I have some unfinished business in GB. :icon_mrgreen: Let me know when the Mrs is at the helm in Laughlin. :laught16::laught16:

Wayne

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Hello Perry

You and I have some unfinished business in GB. :icon_mrgreen: Let me know when the Mrs is at the helm in Laughlin. :laught16::laught16:

Wayne

Hi Wayne. I'll give you a call when we're in Laughlin on the 11th and/or the 15th - This traveling to and from the gem show in Tucson. Perhaps

we can get something going later in the Spring. I want to get down there again at least once before the warm weather begins. Hope to see you

soon. --Perry--

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Perry

Just give me a call when your ready. Have a good time at the show. I hope to make it next year.

Wayne :icon_mrgreen:

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ALL,

Today some very interesting information was obtained by Larry Sloan, he gave me a call and we rattled this information around and we think that it just might be possible that the Franconia H5 S3 W2 that was found by John Wolfe back in 2002, just might be the meteor that shed Irons throughout its entry thru the earths atmosphere.

At least 17 different pieces have been paired with the original Franconia. The original Franconia showed rare metallic copper as did the SacW005 ungrouped Iron classification. One other bit of evidence is the fact that the Fayolite composition of the two is almost identical.

I have leaned more toward the Buck Mountain Wash classification as having been the mother to all these irons, but since getting back the classification on the Irons and in light of this newly obtained information, we may be a little closer to solving the mystery. The Buck Mountain Wash meteorite has a 25.1 fayolite content and has had at least 3 pairings. It shows large metallic inclusions as does the Franconia. It may also be possible that both these meteors shed out irons upon entry.

I will try to keep those that have an interest, updated on any findings.

Jim

Jim, thanks for all these tidbit's. I've been copying and filing them away for future reference. Someday it will congeal and the answer will come forth....

Thanks again, hope to see you and all at the Gem Show, jim "hawk"

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Thanks for posting those links.

Enjoyed both those pictures back when they were posted on the Picture of the day, Enjoyed seeing them again.

This time around, they got a name. :woohoo:

Jim

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