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digitrich

Due to the lack of response on my below Mine lab question, I assume not many of you use Explorers, what kind of metal detectors do you reccomend??

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I also have a cheesy Landstar Bounty Hunter, powerful but not so accurate ID. And a F75 which I am still learning.

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One of the best in my opinion is the Whites GMT....I have seen many meteorites found with one.

That is what I would look for to hunt gold and meteorites.....just my opinion.

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I also have a cheesy Landstar Bounty Hunter, powerful but not so accurate ID. And a F75 which I am still learning.

Your lack of response may be due to the fact that many folks are out at Franconia this weekend. I use my GP3k and I know many other people who do the same. Many of us are gold hunters and are set up for that. The GP works great. The GMT, Goldbug and other gold type detectors work great and are lighter than the GP. At Franconia the meteorites have a high iron content and scream pretty good.

Hope that helps.

mick

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Hi Digitrich

Heres an answer for you from one who's found thousands of stone meteorites. The last detector I would consider using is a coin/relic machine. I'm certain that's not the answer you wanted to hear but it's the answer. Stone ordinary chondrite type meteorites have very small particles of iron nickle scattered through them that even many low end gold machines and auto track gold machines will or can tune out. Most quality VLF and PI gold detectors are designed to see and respond to the tinyest of targets in highly mineralized ground. An all purpose coin relic machine is set up with oodles of filters to dicriminate all but certain target responses. Most in all metal mode still won't hold a candle to an upper end vlf or pi gold machine. Here's a suggestion to try. Get a couple small few gram pieces of meteorites ,especially the type your looking for and try it on your machines to see if they will make a respose to them. Don't use a bench test take them in the field and test. My recomendations are for ,planatary, achondrites , LL ordinary chondrites , Goldmaster series ( not the GMT) or Goldbug 2. L and H chondrides even heavily weathered most any quality gold machine in manual ground balance only. Stoney Iron and Iron meteorites you can use just about anything in all metal mode if they are shallow. Over 1 foot in depth a minelab PI over 3 feet in depth a large pieces only a lorenze or pulsestar PI. Happy Huntin John B.

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Hi Digitrich

Heres an answer for you from one who's found thousands of stone meteorites. The last detector I would consider using is a coin/relic machine. I'm certain that's not the answer you wanted to hear but it's the answer. Stone ordinary chondrite type meteorites have very small particles of iron nickle scattered through them that even many low end gold machines and auto track gold machines will or can tune out. Most quality VLF and PI gold detectors are designed to see and respond to the tinyest of targets in highly mineralized ground. An all purpose coin relic machine is set up with oodles of filters to dicriminate all but certain target responses. Most in all metal mode still won't hold a candle to an upper end vlf or pi gold machine. Here's a suggestion to try. Get a couple small few gram pieces of meteorites ,especially the type your looking for and try it on your machines to see if they will make a respose to them. Don't use a bench test take them in the field and test. My recomendations are for ,planatary, achondrites , LL ordinary chondrites , Goldmaster series ( not the GMT) or Goldbug 2. L and H chondrides even heavily weathered most any quality gold machine in manual ground balance only. Stoney Iron and Iron meteorites you can use just about anything in all metal mode if they are shallow. Over 1 foot in depth a minelab PI over 3 feet in depth a large pieces only a lorenze or pulsestar PI. Happy Huntin John B.

Thanks John. My sovereign hears even the tiny irons from Franconia fine, but that's in my back yard (buried shallow) not in the field with all the mineralization. I don't know much about the explorer. I just use my PI and it does a really nice job.

mick

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Hi Digitrich

Heres an answer for you from one who's found thousands of stone meteorites. The last detector I would consider using is a coin/relic machine. I'm certain that's not the answer you wanted to hear but it's the answer. Stone ordinary chondrite type meteorites have very small particles of iron nickle scattered through them that even many low end gold machines and auto track gold machines will or can tune out. Most quality VLF and PI gold detectors are designed to see and respond to the tinyest of targets in highly mineralized ground. An all purpose coin relic machine is set up with oodles of filters to dicriminate all but certain target responses. Most in all metal mode still won't hold a candle to an upper end vlf or pi gold machine. Here's a suggestion to try. Get a couple small few gram pieces of meteorites ,especially the type your looking for and try it on your machines to see if they will make a respose to them. Don't use a bench test take them in the field and test. My recomendations are for ,planatary, achondrites , LL ordinary chondrites , Goldmaster series ( not the GMT) or Goldbug 2. L and H chondrides even heavily weathered most any quality gold machine in manual ground balance only. Stoney Iron and Iron meteorites you can use just about anything in all metal mode if they are shallow. Over 1 foot in depth a minelab PI over 3 feet in depth a large pieces only a lorenze or pulsestar PI. Happy Huntin John B.

Thank you for your very thorough response. I really do appreciate the info. I have a Pulse Star with both the 10 inch coil and a custom built pvc 7.5 foot square coil, I am going to tow. My Explorer SE has picked up gold nuggets 1/4 inch square at almost 16 inches on a black sand heavy mineralized beach and truly does have an affinity for small iron. I will eventually buy a GP Xtreme, about the only one I don't have yet. Kind of pricey. But until I can come up with the scratch, my plan was; while I was out coin shooting in these farm fields, to get some ID numbers for the Explorer that I regularly use and know well so if I go over a meteorite, I'll know to dig. I am pretty familiar with all the filters on the SE and it's different settings, I pretty much only hunt in all metal, what I don't know is where the different types of meteorites ID on the screen. The reason I am partial to the ML Explorer is it litterally has nearly 1000 points on the screen where different targets ID, to the point where you can tell a memorial cent from a new cent to an indian head to a fatty indian head. It's pretty exact, and I am hoping to eventually be able to tell an iron from a stony an etc. I know certain frequencies work really well for certain types of metals, and certain machines handle the mineralization better, I wonder how an Excallibur would do? I am kind of bummed about the Excalibur I have cause 2 months after I bought it, they came out with the Excalibur 2.

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Hi Digitrich

Well I don't think there will be any particular numbers you will find that will work for all space rocks ! There are so many variables, even within the same fall target resonses will vary greatly based by weathering , backgound mineralization and particle sizes and shapes of free metal contained within. Even solid iron/nickle space rocks can vary greatly from 4 or 5 % nickle to in excess of 25% nickle. On the other side of the scale planatary basalts, carbonacous chondrites and many achondites can have minimul to no free metal and even on the most sensetive gold machines are barely audible at best . You will certainly have to dig lots of crap in the average farm field to hunt for meteorites. If your in a known find location and can get samples of that find for testing you might be able to eliminate digging some crap ?? As far as your 1/4 inch piece of gold found at 16 inches !! I don't know why minelab would invent the SD GP PI detectors when thier coin machines can go deeper :confused0013: ?? About the smallest gold target I've dug at that depth was probably a couple pennyweight :angry-smiley-010: , Of course I'm not as good as Denny who digs a couple grains at 2 feet :innocent0002: !! Oh I get it you must be using the Goldstudmuffins minelab ruler :laught16::laught16::laught16: ???? Happy Huntin John B.

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Well heres my :twocents: my explorer 2 sucks on gold targets only average depth-gold rings 5-7 inches max :innocent0009: but really shines on old deep silver-it will blow anything-other coin beepers out of the water when it comes to silver :icon_mrgreen: --it sucks for meteorites as well :innocent0009: --I would find a differant vlf for meteor beeping as well as gold beeping :innocent0009: --1/4 inch peice of gold at 16"- :confused0013: -were you using one of those fishing/greaterville rulers :hmmmmmm: -Mike C... :ph34r2:

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Hi Mike

My thoughts exactly :confused0013: ?? But I know squat about minelab coin machines excepting they are easy prey at the competition coin hunts :innocent0009: !! Happy Huntin John B.

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All right guys, funny , funny. That particular event only happened once in wet surf sand, with a stock ten coil. But I litterally kept finding gold nuggets about that size between 13 and 16 inches deep. I had to dig them in between waves coming in because if I didn't retrieve the target before the next set of waves came, my hole would refill with sand, talk about a work out. They were on average 3/4 inch long, 1/2 inch wide and about a 1/4 inch thick. There were several smaller ones, but no I didn't get them as deep, closer to the twelve inch mark. In most cases the signal was pretty weak but I had it set on deep, running the sensitivity pretty hot and had the gain at 8. On dry land, the SE won't even come close to that depth unless you are using a monster size coil. If some one can tell me how to upload photos, I can post them for you. I browsed and selected the photo and hit upload but it just keeps spinning saying "uploading file ...". And then it stops and the picture isn't uploading????

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Hi Digitrich

I would prefer to hear the story about this one instead :confused0013: ??

My Explorer SE has picked up gold nuggets 1/4 inch square at almost 16 inches on a black sand heavy mineralized beach and truly does have an affinity for small iron.

Boy Oh Boy I know you could teach the Studmuffin Twins and the rest of us poor bastards some detecting skills or better yet measuring skills :laught16::laught16: !! Happy Huntin John B.

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Rich; depth accuracy aside...if you have a spot where you find placer gold in the (salt-water?) surf you ought to be running a dredge or sluice...then you could afford the Big Gun...

Fred

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I was thinking about buying a Minelab Explorer for occasional coin hunting and the only reason I haven't done it yet is because I've been told it really lacks in the depth department. I don't know what beach your going to, but I've never heard of a beach where there's natural gold nuggets that big, mostly really fine stuff. digitrich if your making claims like this I think your going to have to come up with some proof. :hmmmmmm:

Perhaps you meant centimeters instead of inches? :shrug:

As for the Bounty Hunter coin machines- I was at an outing one time and I had just popped out a 70 gram chondrite and somebody there wanted to test their Bounty Hunter out on it. That machine didn't see that chondrite at all, it's like it wasn't there.

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Del; for coin or beach hunting the EX se-2 is I think hard to beat...I have a friend that hunts old military camps in the desert and whips all his buds that aren't using one...13 or 14 hundred for occasional coin hunting is steep...but it is just for fun,, right!

Fred

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Dear Digitrich

I want to appoligize for putting humor in my posts about your experiences :sadwalk: . You came here to inquire and learn something :smrt1: . I tried to answer you as in depth as I could for what I know to be true :hmmmmmm: . I took it from the heading on this post that you were impatient or unsatisfied with the responses you got before :Huh_anim]: . The human effect on machines is what I didn't address. As one uses and becomes one with his machine he learns the subtle indications in it's responses to indicate a target is present. Most manuals recomend a minimum of 100 hours on a machine of test driving to get a feel for it's abilities. Many of the best detectorist have probably walked away from space rock finds :shrug: . Either they weren't exposed to learning to ID them or they were and use the common types as thier guidance. There are many space rocks out there that at best make very little response on the best beepers and oddly they are some of the most valuable :headphones: . Seeing, touching a feeling these types are of great benifit to ones learning curve. These items maybe rare finds but it doesn;t mean they are all that uncommon they are just rarely identified. Food for thought :confused0013: !! Happy Huntin John B.

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Rich; depth accuracy aside...if you have a spot where you find placer gold in the (salt-water?) surf you ought to be running a dredge or sluice...then you could afford the Big Gun...

Fred

Ussually placer gold in salt water is real fine, flour gold. The gold I found was in larger nugget form, my only guess was maybe a spanish galleon or war ship was transporting gold that hadn't been refined or someone had a bag with gold in it that they dropped overboard some how. I didn't know any better at the time, but yes a sluice would have been a really good idea. It wasn't until I watched episodes of Gold Fever that I realized my mistake. I went back to the spot with a friend about two weeks later and the beach was rebuilding (sand was coming in) rather than eroding and all targets were to deep to get a signal from. I just came back from Florida's Treasure Coast, Vero Beach; and it was the same deal, the beaches were having sand coming in instead of going out. They also were experiencing Red Tide, I don't know if that effects the mineralization of the sand any, but the largest coil I could use in the wet sand was the stock ten inch. Apparently, the only good time to metal detect the beaches of Florida's treasure coast is right after a strong winter storm or hurricane. When I found the nuggets last year, I also found a layer of black muck (smelly) rotted stuff, with a crushed layer of shells on top, so I guess there had been some recent erosion of the beach.

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Hi Digitrich

Well I don't think there will be any particular numbers you will find that will work for all space rocks ! There are so many variables, even within the same fall target resonses will vary greatly based by weathering , backgound mineralization and particle sizes and shapes of free metal contained within. Even solid iron/nickle space rocks can vary greatly from 4 or 5 % nickle to in excess of 25% nickle. On the other side of the scale planatary basalts, carbonacous chondrites and many achondites can have minimul to no free metal and even on the most sensetive gold machines are barely audible at best . You will certainly have to dig lots of crap in the average farm field to hunt for meteorites. If your in a known find location and can get samples of that find for testing you might be able to eliminate digging some crap ?? As far as your 1/4 inch piece of gold found at 16 inches !! I don't know why minelab would invent the SD GP PI detectors when thier coin machines can go deeper :confused0013: ?? About the smallest gold target I've dug at that depth was probably a couple pennyweight :angry-smiley-010: , Of course I'm not as good as Denny who digs a couple grains at 2 feet :innocent0002: !! Oh I get it you must be using the Goldstudmuffins minelab ruler :laught16::laught16::laught16: ???? Happy Huntin John B.

My SE gets much better depth in wet soil then dry, litterally twice as much, and when there is salt involved it goes even deeper. Falses a bunch, but gets incredible depth in the wet sand. But in general, the Explorers suck at gold rings, but nuggets give a larger target than a gold ring. Same as if you had a roll of pennies sitting perpendicular to the coil, the machine wouldn't pick it up any better than a single penny because the targets width hasn't changed any. When I did locate the gold nuggets, the signals were pretty faint and I would shovel out a couple inches of sand and listened to see if the signal improved or went to iron. How does your ML GP do in wet sand??? This farmers field I am working used to be a fair ground, 150 years ago, so I am pulling out Seated Silver coins, I know there has got to be gold coins too, but I have found none yet. Thought about trying a GP Extreme in there. But yes, I know what it's like to dig lots and lots of crap, because the fair is so old, I am digging everything except iron, and eventually, I'll start digging that. That's how I ended up digging these meteor maybes.

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Welcome back...I often wonder how many emeralds get thrown back by beach go-ers that think they are funny looking peices of green glass...

I am posting a picture to remember how to explain to you how to post a pic.........

Click on browse

select picture from your files

click upload

click add reply ( donot preview post)it should be there....and it is!!!

Fred

post-378-1199892509_thumb.jpg

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G'Day Fred

Nice pic what's that weight on that one ???

Cheers Johnno

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Welcome back...I often wonder how many emeralds get thrown back by beach go-ers that think they are funny looking peices of green glass...

I am posting a picture to remember how to explain to you how to post a pic.........

Click on browse

select picture from your files

click upload

click add reply ( donot preview post)it should be there....and it is!!!

Fred

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Allright, I don't bloody get it...WHY can't I post a picture on here. I hit browse, located a 20 kb picture on my computer, clicked it twice, hit upload and all that happens is it spins saying uploading, but never does do it??????????? :grrr01: HELPPPPPP

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Sorry digitrich, I still don't believe you found that at 16" deep with a 10" coil on your Explorer. :shrug: I think you've gotta realise there's a lot of pro hunters (like John B. and Fred) on this forum that are fully aware of different metal detectors depth capabilities. I agree with the statement John makes, why would Minelab make a gold detector and sell them for $4000 dollars when their coin machines can outperform the depth of their high dollar PI machines?

You have to realise this forum isn't like other forums where most the people don't have a clue what they're doing and what their machines are capable of. On this forum you get very knowledgeable people who are honest and make realistic claims.

Thats alright though, your claim isn't the most ridiculous I've heard. On the GPAA forum, I saw a post a guy made claiming he found birdshot 2 feet deep with a Gold Bug II! Yeah right :laught16:

Fred- is that the 50 grammer you found hunting with me that day?

Del

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Rich, have you had your nuggets checked...some joker may have been practicing making fake-nuggets and threw some on the beach for fun...if it is gold you are lucky to find it with an SE I think...but you were there.

Hi Johno...and Del...that is a gold-basin which I found in four pieces...I think the total weight was @ 50 grams...I will attach the pieces-picture.

Del, thanks for the complement but my name is not nearly worthy of being mentioned in the same sentence with the mighty big name, Mr. B...I don't qualify for a pimple on his butt-crack which I have always endeavored to get him to cover up with his lacy pink thong....

Fred

post-378-1199912193_thumb.jpg

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Yes they are real and yes they were that deep, if I use a larger coil on the beach, I actually get less depth from my SE, it has something to do with the wet salt actually helping transmit the signal better with specific size coils, smaller and larger coils wouldn't even make a peep, on those nuggets. There are so many settings on the Explorers that if you get them to the right G spot, they can produce extreme depths that I have not been able to duplicate with even their Excalibur, which is specifically made for salt water??? I don't doubt their $4000 GPXtreme machine would whip an explorers butt in heavy IRON mineralized ground, but it is quite possible it wouldn't in salt mineralized, wet sand. I don't know, as I don't yet own a GPXtreme, and I don't know how quick I would take 4 grand un- waterproofed into the surf, but hey, I am dumb enough to try it with my $1500 SE, so if I thought I'd find a gold doubloom doing it, yeah, I'd probably try it :laught16:

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