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Another photo of Holmes...


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Hi gang, here is another shot of the Comet. This one was taken using my wife's Canon Rebel. And I did one of Orion's Nebula too. Enjoy, Jason. :;):

Photo details: Comet 17P Holmes from N. Las Vegas, NV.

122307Nov2007

Canon Rebel EOS 1min. 400 ISO

Orion's Nebula from N. Las Vegas, NV.

122300Nov2007

Canon Rebel EOS 55 sec. 400 ISO

post-1008-1194942390_thumb.jpg

post-1008-1194942515_thumb.jpg

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Hi gang, here is another shot of the Comet. This one was taken using my wife's Canon Rebel. And I did one of Orion's Nebula too. Enjoy, Jason. :;):

Photo details: Comet 17P Holmes from N. Las Vegas, NV.

122307Nov2007

Canon Rebel EOS 1min. 400 ISO

Orion's Nebula from N. Las Vegas, NV.

122300Nov2007

Canon Rebel EOS 55 sec. 400 ISO

WOW Jason!!! Those are incredible images!!! Where on Orion does that nebula exist?? :WOW: AMAZING!!! ~Kel

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Kelly, Orion's Nebula is probably one of the most photographed nebula's out there. It lies in the "sash" of Orion's belt, the three minor stars hanging vertical from the three main stars that designate Orion in the sky.

Del, thanks for the encouragement. Since I can't get out as much as I would like to look for meteorites, this is the next best free thing to do. Jason :;):

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Kelly, Orion's Nebula is probably one of the most photographed nebula's out there. It lies in the "sash" of Orion's belt, the three minor stars hanging vertical from the three main stars that designate Orion in the sky.

Del, thanks for the encouragement. Since I can't get out as much as I would like to look for meteorites, this is the next best free thing to do. Jason :;):

Cool Jason, thanks!! Is it possible to view the nebula through my rinky dink telescope or do you need a super high powered one? I always have a really clear view of Orion every night so I'll have to check it out!! Don't forget, tonight is the last night of the North Taurids meteor shower!!! Slow fireballs!!!! :whoopie:

Thanks, ~Kel

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Jason:

Excellent photo and it rivals many of those I've seen put up by the "pros" recently. That image is a trophy to be proud of! The particle cloud is still expanding at a rapid rate and now exceeds the size of the sun.

The discovery 115 years ago was made after it brightened just 5 months after perihelion. It is interesting to note that it is again 5 months after it passed close to the sun and I am thinking there was a collision that caused the particle discharge. There are a lot of asteroids in the belt that the comet must traverse between Mars and Jupiter and a high speed impact cannot be ruled out. A trajectory map is included so those that have telescopes can see if there is a change in the predicted path across the sky. Documentation of an orbit change would be a fantastic discovery although it will be difficult now since the apparent comet movement against the sky is quite slow. Please keep an eye out for any trajectory change as this would indicate an impact as the cause of brightening.

Johnny

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Kel, even the modest of scope should be able to see the nebula. I have viewed it sometimes even with binos, but they lack the detail of a scope. The big challenge is seeing it in a darkened sky.

Johnny, thanks for the comments. It will be interesting to see if in fact it did get "hit" by something. That is a theory that's being tossed around in some of the forums, but haven't heard of anyone really knowing why or what caused it to brighten the way it did. The tail has become disengaged which is another mystery we are seeing now. Still a great free show of nature.

Jason :;):

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Hi Jayray and all,

Nice photos of Holmes! I have just recently been brushing up on digital photography (I am a pretty seasoned

film astrophotograper) and took some myself which I would like to share with people here if you care to look.

Comets, asteroids and many other solar system members have a lot to do with meteorites and fit nicely into

this topic.

Taken at 22:17 p.m. through a 4 inch Pentax refractor at F/12 (1200 mm focal length). Approximately 25

second exposure. Digital Rebel XT at prime focus.

http://s239.photobucket.com/albums/ff244/AlMitt/

--AL Mitterling

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Al, very nice indeed!!! I have dabbled with the film stuff for the past few years and now have been playing with my wife's digital. I also have a Meade DSI I but haven't quite mastered that yet or even come close. My scope isn't SMT and I need to keep the exposure time to a minimum. Even when it is aligned, it goes out of alignment pretty fast. Again, nice photos! Jason :;):

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