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A better picture (Film is better, sometimes)


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OK Gang, here is the film version of Comet 17P Holmes :whoopie: . I took this from the backyard, with all the sky glow, I was surprised when I got the film back :whoopie: :WOW: :cool04: ! This was about a 1 1/2 to 2 minute exposure, on Kodak Elite Chrome (E-6) film with an Olympus OM-1 through the scope (Meade LX-200 8" GPS).

Gotta love film :laught16::ROFL: ......Jason :;):

post-1008-1194152321_thumb.jpg

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Jason,

I recently purchased a telescope and one night not too long ago was up late looking around. I saw what I thought was a planet and then later checked an online star chart and no planet was scheduled to be up there at that time, it really had me puzzled, but I have since realized that I was looking right at the Comet Holmes. Nice photo there.

Rex

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Rex, Astronomy is one of those rare hobbies that has some much to offer and almost all of it for free :ROFL: !!! Comet Holmes is one of those rare cases. I've had a couple of scopes now :zapped: :laught16: , the current the LX-200, and love the cold nights, the bright stars and the anticipation of seeing some new every night :idea: . It will be interesting to see what happens to Holmes in the coming months :hmmmmmm: .... Jason :;):

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Jason,

Yea, kind of free, once you get the equipment :innocent0009: I was looking through a 12" Orion dobsonian with a denkmeier binoviewer and 11mm nagler eyepeices. The seeing was below average though and I was wondering if I was looking at Saturn or something. How do you like Schmidt-Cassegrains? I think their views are a little crisper than fast reflectors, I need to get a coma corrector sometime.

Rex

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Hi Gang, thanks for the comments. :wubu:

Rex, the Schmidt is nice and not too big for my taste. A friend has a 12" and it's kinda too big to transport around looking for a good spot. The capability is there, but there are a lot of other things to consider about the scope (i.e. gears, quality, optics, ect.) I started out with a reflector 4.5" then moved up to the 8" Schmidt. Personally, I think refractor's are probably the best, but expensive :hmmmmmm: . One of the guys in the club has a 4" and the seeing one particular night wasn't the best, but the view was unreal. Nice clarity, crisp and a sharp view. Bino-viewers are nice and provide a good eye relief (meaning for both eyes that is), and nagler's are some of the best eye pieces around.

Keep looking up or down depending on the hobby....

Jason :;):

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G'Day Jason

could I get a look tonight I have a Meade 60at with hand controller and a orion skyglow filter. I just hope the fog stays away at the beach here.

Thats a great shot

Cheers Johnno

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Jason,

Yeah, the 12" is about the limit of my transporting capabilities and I will admit that sometimes after a long day you don't feel like lugging it around. However, I thought I might as well go for big aperture at a lower price - hence the reflector. Good eyepieces are a must especially with big reflectors or your image will suffer. I would get a big refractor but unfortunately I guess they are more costly for an equal aperture.

Rex

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Johnno, any telescope will work. Actually, binos are probably better because you get a wider view of the area :hmmmmmm: . Right now, it all depends on your skies, here in Vegas, well not such luck because of cloud cover. Good luck finding it, again look North East about 45-50 degrees in elevation, in the constellation Perseus. It's the fuzz ball that can be seen naked eye. Jason :;):

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Rex, some of the Dobs on the market are pretty good for their size and price. I always wanted to make my own, and actually did, but due to some mis-calculations on focal length, it wasn't just right. Then I didn't have enough of a focuser to focus out the mistake. So, I'm sticking with the 8" SC. Jason :;):

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Jason,

I thought about making one but figured I would mess it up as well. Apparently the Chinese have made buying some telescopes less costly as well. I researched your scope and it sounds like you made a good choice with the built in gps system.

Rex

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Rex, it's like any piece of technology, once you buy it, someone else improves it and the next version is better. Now they have the SMT (Smart mount technology), which mine doesn't have but I can add it on if I choose too. The biggest problem with most goto scopes is the worm gears. There are errors in the gears, that over time can cause an aligned scope to lose sync with the rotation of the Earth. For most people, this isn't a bad problem, but for those who like to do astrophotography, it's a HUGE problem. Plus, after eight minutes (again worm gear rotation) if you were to look an astrophoto, you would see the imperfections of the star trails. These errors are like little "wwwwww"'s or so which makes for a crummy picture. Then there is the astro camera, either CCD or film. Most people (vast majority) use CCD, but then again, there are errors with that too. The list goes on and on. I try to keep it simple, if I get one picture out of a roll or 36, I'm happy. Jason :;):

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Dear Jason and others with telescopes:

Is it possible to determine, at his early date, if the comet has altered the well established historical orbit?

My thinking is that there was a collision with another object that released the material that we are now seeing. Hyper-velocity impact would move the main comet body off course. All of Comet 17P/Holmes historical orbit lies within the Mars and Jupiter orbits with a period of 6.9 years. It is not a "deep space traveler" as many scientists speculate all comets must be. The object was discovered over a century ago when it grew brighter than normal. This latest brightening is at least 1 million times the normal!

My research into comet samples that I have recovered from impact craters reveals that they are not a “dirty ice ball” that many scientists have put forth. Water genesis by shock induced pressures in the amphiboles Cummingtonite and Grunerite yield samples that are primarily magnetite and quartz. These highly shocked samples show tiny fissures that allow for the large volumes of superheated water to escape. These particles can disperse widely in space and make for a spectacular visual display.

The reaction for Grunerite is as follows;

Fe7Si8O22(OH)2 + 7/6O2 →HYPERVELOCITY SHOCK INDUCED PRESSURE→ 7/3Fe3O4 + 8SiO2 + H2O (36)

The reaction for Cummingtonite is as follows;

(Fe0.6Mg0.4)7Si8O22(OH)2 + 7/6O2 →HYPERVELOCITY SHOCK INDUCED PRESSURE→ 7/3Fe3O4 + 8SiO2 + H2O (36)

Sincerely,

Johnny Tonko

http://meteoritecrater.com

Copyright © 2006-2007 by Johnny F. Tonko

All Rights Reserved

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