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How many gold Basins in this Pix


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Hi All

This is a link to a pix on my old website I Hope ??? There are apx 2500 pieces somewhere in excess of 225 lbs the largest is around 1600 grams excluding a few peices that fit on it !! These were only my finds, Jim, Twink and David had about 1/2 this amount combined !!

Happy Huntin John B

http://www.treasure-hunting-info.com/GoldMaster/chubby.htm

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Hi All

This is a link to a pix on my old website I Hope ??? There are apx 2500 pieces somewhere in excess of 225 lbs the largest is around 1600 grams excluding a few peices that fit on it !! These were only my finds, Jim, Twink and David had about 1/2 this amount combined !!

Happy Huntin John B

http://www.treasure-hunting-info.com/GoldMaster/chubby.htm

You forgot to add this to the photo !

DW

On November 24, 1995, Professor Jim Kriegh was prospecting for gold with a metal detector in Hualapai Wash, part of a natural drainage system of northern Arizona. Here he found two small stones. These two stones, weighing around 13 grams, where the first Gold Basin meteorites officially found. This meteorite was however discovered several times in the past by other prospectors searching for gold in the region. For many years, prospectors were annoyed by the amount of hot rocks that showed up on their metal detectors. These “Hot Rocks” tossed out of the rock sack at the end of the day or left in the dirt pile turned out to be meteorites!

After these stones where discovered to be meteorites, the strewn field was kept secret for a couple years, Jim Kriegh, Ingrid Monrad and John Blennant working with the University of Arizona made a valiant attempt to map the strewn field and recover as many stones as possible.

Over 4000 specimens have been found so far by this team. Each meteorite is weighed and bagged in the field with its coordinates carefully noted. More then the first thousand where taken to the lab where they were described in detail, dried in a vacuum chamber, re-weighed and photographed.

The Prospector

While I was at the 2002 Tucson mineral and meteorite show, one of these gold prospectors showed me what I believe to be the main mass of the Gold Basin meteorite. This man was in his forties, wearing overalls and sporting a pair of army prescription glasses. Not a person you would picture having an interest in meteorites. After carefully unwrapping a glass dome from a box he presented a weathered meteorite over 3000 grams. About 30 meteorite fragments where glued together on a pole that rested in the middle of the glass dome. On the base of the dome a brass plate, “GOLD BASIN METEORITE MAIN MASS”. The meteorite appeared potato shaped and was missing a piece about 20 grams. According to the prospector, all the pieces where found together in a small area. Several hours the following day where spent trying to find the missing piece with no luck. The asking price of Gold Basin this year Tucson was from $.75 to $2.00 a gram. His asking price for the Gold Basin main mass was $30,000, about $10.00 a gram. This was his ace in the hole and he wasn’t letting it go cheap.

The same prospector also gave testimony of searching the area for gold years before and tossing these “hot rocks” aside. Several Gold Basins were even later recovered at his usual camp site. This same prospector, after changing to search for meteorites, found a piece of quartz and he didn’t understand why it was setting his metal detector off. This gem was almost tossed aside before it occurred to him...it was gold!

Different Meteorites found in the Basin

More then a dozen different meteorites have since been found in the Gold Basin strewfield. The first was the L5 King Tut, A 19.51 g stone found by John Blennert on March 6, 1997. This however would not be the last for Gold Basin or Blennert. In the next couple years, a carbonaceous (Temple Bar) and a mesosiderite (White Hills) were found. John Blennert would make meteorite news a second time by finding White Elephant, an L4 that looks identical to Gold Basin. Only cosmogenic nuclide indicates it is recent fall. To make the Gold Basin meteorites more confusing, this stone was found in the center of the strewn field. Cosmogenic nuclides also suggest that it is a fragment of a larger mass.

At least 10 of the meteorites found in this strewn field that have not been identified as Gold Basin where classified L-Chondrites. These non-L4 chondrites whose pairing are still to be determined, are being designated as “Hualapai Wash”. The first Haulapai Wash was found November 18, 2000 by Donald O’Keefe. This was a 206 gram stone that seemed different to Donald from the other Gold Basins he had found that day (Amazingly, his first time in the strewn field). The matrix is much darker then the average Gold Basin. Classified as an L6, the chondrules are defined poorly. Its crust was very weathered and metal is scattered about. Only the last two observations look anything like Gold Basin.

Two other non Gold Basin stones have since been found by O’Keefe, who has made the Basin his currant home. These stones were recognized as being different by the sound they made under the metal detector O’Keefe uses to search. His later find is known as Hualapai Wash 004. “When I swept my coil over it I got a double hit and, when I pumped up and down on it, it really screamed much like a pull-tab would. I believe that the reason for this is that the metal isn’t evenly distributed in the matrix, but rather occurs in groups.” This meteorite was is an L5. This meteorite has a light matrix like Gold Basin. Like O’Keefe noted the metal in this meteorite is in groups, with several pockets and many armored chondrules. It does not look like any Gold Basin I have seen.

The largest “Haulapai Wash” is Haulapai Wash 10. At 2.35kg it is the largest stone found in the Gold Basin strewn field and at one time was considered the main mass by many. After being classified an L6, it was given its own number. Most of the other Haulapai Wash’s are L6’s. Several of them are likely paired with each other.

The distribution of the Gold Basin fall appears pretty even, in both mass and stone numbers. This has the experts leaning towards the belief the meteorite exploded in one burst. Comparison with other meteorite falls that created many individuals agrees with this theory. Most individuals weigh under 30 grams and they seem to me, to outnumber specimens over 100 grams, 15 or more to one. The large size of the strewn field and the many non L4’s has many believing the meteorite was a breccia. This helped it break into smaller pieces and leaves the possibility for the other L chondrites found in the strewn field to be in fact, Gold Basins as well.

Are they all Gold Basins?

This has been suggested by several people. Olivine percentage in many of the L-Chondrites are very similar:

Gold Basin (L4) : Fa mol% 24±1

Goldin Rule (L5): Fa mol% 24.1±0.5

King Tut (L5): Fa mol% 24.7±0.5

Haulapai Wash (L6): Fa mol% 24.6

Haulapai Wash 3 (L5): Fa mol% 24.0 +/1 0.4%

Haulapai Wash 4 (L5): Fa mol% 24.7 +/1 0.3%

As shown in the crust comparison photo, most of the L-Chondrites found in the strewn field have a highly weathered crust. The official weathering stage of Gold Basin is 2-3. It has been noted to vary drastically between W1 to W4 (Wlotzka, 1993). I have talked with many of the hunters that search the strewn field regularly. Most have stories of trying to match pieces together at the end of the day. Several of these puzzle are in my own collection.

The matrix of the Gold Basin varies from a light gray to black. This shows the meteorite is brecciaed. However, this does not show up on a thin section. This is confusing to many collectors and sellers. In Gold Basin the olivine in the darker color matrix is very similar to the olivine in the light color matrix. Pyroxene and other values are also very close. So in other words, it is a breccia made completely from L-chondrite fragments, possibly from the same parent body. However, given of the small size of the stones and the large number of uncut stones in collections it is possible we have not found our puzzle key yet. The slice above shows a dark region in the mostly lighter colored matrix. I have observed a tendency for metal veining to appear often in the darker matrix, while metal pockets and armored chondrules appear in the light matrix. Metal veining has appeared in several of the Hualapai Wash meteorites. In Hualapai Wash 4, we have a lighter matrix with metal in pockets and armored chondrules.

The easy answer would be to classify the Gold Basin as a genomict breccia meteoroid composed of different meteorite types. A person could then say most of the different meteorites found in this strewn field, was in fact the same meteorite, Gold Basin. In the Atacama Desert of Chile, a large number of L-chondrites have also been found. This has led people to speculate that H-chondrites weather into L-chondrites. After all, how could one account for so many different L-chondrites in a small area? It would be hard for this author to imagine all theses meteorites being contributed to one fall. Perhaps the real truth is meteorites are more common then we ever thought possible.

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Very,Very, interesting. Great Info.

I have been waiting for more info on the different frags. I have some small black pieces from one area and hope to get a opinion on these one of these days. With so many new discoveries in the works we may never find out in our lifetime.

Wayne

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WoW!!! The digital World.

These pieces were found next to each other on the surface Center of field.??? Did someone put these there to mess with our heads. :laught16::laught16: The dark frag is same color both sides and is blacker in person.

Wayne

post-1528-1191598186_thumb.jpg

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Dennis, very interesting, indeed!!! I've wondered myself about the make-up of the so called "Gold Basin's" and find it interesting to consider an H turning into an L. But again, that is someone's interpretation based on the various finds with in the area. On the other hand, I think there are a lot more meteorites in the area, like Franconia, and we (collectively as a whole) have only found the "tip of the iceberg" in this field (both figuratively and literally). That's what makes it fun to hunt down there, you never know what you might find....Happy Hunting!!! Jason :;):

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Hi Dennis and All

I have seen this authers article before but am unaware who it is. Probably Bob Varish or Robert Matson. They were not in the inner circle of what was going on and the limited testing that was preformed by the U of A. Both Jim and I had found lots of variations in samples found most were shown to Dr Kring. But with his limited funds very few were tested for differences. Both Jim and I found pieces with viening and color variationd of matrix in the early days but they were dismissed as variations of the Gold Basin Parent Mass. Jim had a slice and thin section that ran from L4 to L5 and L6 depending on where you looked at it. Both the King Tut and White Elephant were determined to be different primarrilly by age analasys. The King Tut L5 was +or - 1000 years old and the White Elephant L4 was discovered by accident while randomly age testing various samples. It's age date was O meaning a realatively fresh fall although visually it was as ugly as the gold basins with no external indication of it's younger earth age. Also Jim and I had found many clusters of fragments that when assembled exceeded 3000 grams. One in particular I found while dragging around my video camera and taped myself digging up the pieces while laughing. I named it the porch patch because I found it 30 feet from Jims motor home front door. Oddly there were several 3-4 hundred gram sized peices and one of about 350 grams that made absolutly no sound on my beeper. While digging another piece out poped this fragment with obvios crust. I later assembled it and saran wraped it together for Dr Kring's inspection. The cluster was in excess of 3000 grams but a couple of the pieces including the silent one was sacrificed to the saws of science and were sliced and diced to determine why there was no metal. The conclusion on those pieces were that they were at some time in there terrestrial stay they were exposed to moisture for a realatively long term and the free metal simply rusted away. I'm not sure how the labs determine the amount of iron/nickle contained in stone space rocks. But I'm certain they have a way of determining the original metal content upon the earth arrival even though the metal has long ago rusted away. Jayray meaning a weathered H should not classify as an L or LL. In Oman many of the space rocks we found contained no visible free metal when cut it had long weathered away. You would think that Oman which has virtually no rainfall would preserve the metal far better than other dry locals. But it bieng an ocean front country it is prone to vast fog fronts moving far inland and surface soaking rocks and sand no deeper than a centimeter or so. Apparently not enough moisture to sustain most desert plants but enough to soak in and rot the metal out of thier space rocks. There are several H chondrites found within the gold basin strewnfield Twink and I both have found them. Mine was found during the early gold basin hunt and recocnized as an H then but after 4 or so years of sitting on Dr Krings lab table was finally named Hualipia Wash 021. The Hualipia Wash group of L meteorites were mostly classified by UCLA who was not really involved in the original Gold Basin study many of which are probable mixes of the gold basin parent body material . I Think . However if they were infact different individual falls it wouldn't suprise me one bit since the waves of new meteorite hunters are now combing this area and with so many people knowing what to look for more individual meteorites are bound to be found or at least recocnized !! Happy Huntin John B.

PS the Table full pix is not my complete amount of Gold Basin Finds. It is minus about 20 kilos sent to the Smithsonian, and a shoe box or so the U of A still had at the time the pix was taken and only God knows how many I have found since then. But if anyone is interested I currently have about that amount on hand at this time still after all my donations and givaways. Give or take a few kilos !!

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