Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums

Regmaglitch

Nugget Shooter Members
  • Posts

    1,021
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    11

Everything posted by Regmaglitch

  1. I used to move boulders from hundred pounders of to the size of a short couch with a pair of cheap 20 ton bottle jacks from Peo Boys. There are plenty of smaller rocks to use for wedges, as you progress, but it doesn’t hurt to have a 6 or 8 inch square piece of 1/4 inch steel plate to put under the foot of the jack, if that side is in loose material. After a while, you figure out that with safety and persistance, you can move anything in your way.
  2. Back when I used to spend a lot of my free time down at the Phoenix BLM office, I happened to mention to the clerk the volume of valid, current claims having new, unresearched, invalid claims filed over them. He said their job is not to validate, but to file claims. He chuckled and said that if you brought him your dog’s pedigree papers, and paid the fee, he would file them, as well. It is up to you to do the research, find or establish proper monuments, maintain them, and make sure they are where papers say they are. Keep your assesment current. If someone files over you, it’s up to you to contact and resolve dusputes, although sometimes it pays to bring the Sherriff’s department into play, if reason fails, or you are threatened. Everybody play nice out there.
  3. Petr, Mikestang and Bob are telling you the honest truth. It is obvious from your photos, that your stone has a “rind”, and not fusion crust. Sorry, but it is not a meteorite.
  4. Not a meteorite. It has no features that meteorites have.
  5. See the difference in these recently found specimens. Same stones in sunlight versus artificial light. (Note: stones are uncleaned)
  6. Photos taken in sunlight tend to show more detail, and also illuminate true color and texture.
  7. I do remember. Online, there are always Steve Curry types that think every round river cobble, and piece of hemetite or slag that they find, is a rare meteorite. Sometimes I see them at a University public outreach event. They are the ones that can’t take no for an answer. “But it’s magnetic”! They never have any basic geology, never bought any meteorites to compare with, and never look closely at the features that can be found in real meteorites. Identifying actual meteorites in the field, that are weathered, oxidized or rusty colored, fragmented, coated with soil, clay, salts, caliche, or desert varnish, not clean, sliced, and polished with a clear preservative to enhance it’s true interior color, is a learning curve. And that curve is best taught by time in the field. The Curry’s of this world, always seem to skip the learning process, and jump to something resembling digging up buried pirate treasure.
  8. Bob, I love it! I look forward to progress on your snack wagon.
  9. Codifica I am not an expert, but in the lower Bradshaws, I have seen a rock with a cross carved on it and the word "oro". It was in an area with lots of both placer and hard rock mines.
  10. Bob, I like the name: Snacks One Guey ===> Ben
  11. Hi Budgie B, . It looks like a concretion - fossil mud. Not a meteorite. Keep hunting, luck smiles on the persistent. Ben
  12. I did the GPAA Nome, Alaska trip in the early eighties. Tons of mosquitoes. But I didn't have a problem with them because I brought the concentrated LIQUID repellent with me. NOT SPRAY! Muskol or Deet are fine as long as it is the LIQUID. Sure, the skeeters would still cloud around your body, but they kept a 5-6" distance. Put it on as if it were sunblock. You will STINK while you wear it, so don't put it on and then expect to run errands or visit folks. But it will keep them off you while you swing that coil or feed that high banker. oh, did I say to get the LIQUID? Ben
  13. Bob, you can drop the eggs next to the Red-Flannel hash.
  14. The photo was ripped off from the website of the Tarus 2X2, which is a actual Russian 2-wheel drive, all-terrain motorcycle. They do not export to the U.S. At this time. When they first came out, the price 35,000 Rubles (About $980). I am sure the price is higher now.
  15. To newbies:. Please take your photos outdoors in natural light. True color and other features that will identify what your suspect stone might be, will be more apparent in sunlight. if you want to window a suspect stone quickly in the field, get a "Sharpening Sone" from Harbor Freight Tools for a few bucks, and keep it in your pack. Home Depot has one also, but charges about ten dollars. Makes a nice window effortlessly, in less than a minute. Low tech, low cost, extremely effective. I personally would not even bother to window rounded river-rock, or common ironstone, but it is all part of the learning curve. Good Hunting to All.
  16. Hey Al, this would have been 73-75.
  17. Hey Bob, How are you? We go up to Taos every couple of years. We always stop at Dean’s memorial, then have lunch at Dion’s, there on Central. My myrtillo’s bloom every year, and grow constantly.
  18. HeyHey Bob, . Great photos! About a century ago when I was in college, a buddy of mine in the same apartments, had a couple of pards who would visit annually on their way to LA, after harvesting two duffle bags of "Yote" in NM. ( no lie) OMG, those guys were different - very Carlos Casteneda, if you know what I mean. I saw the stuff, it was real deal. I've lived in Arizona my whole life, and never seen it in the wild, but since I HAVE seen a lot of exotic cacti, It is certainly possible. I have 5 colors of Peruvian Echinopsis night bloomers. It was a tough summer, my saffron orange ones wouldn't bloom! My pride is in my crested myrtillo cactus geometrizens ( not sure on spelling) from deep down in San Luis Petosi. They are huge and always provide me with a tasty crop of "garambullos" after they bloom their tiny white flowers. Best Regards, Ben
  19. HI Chrisrobe, . I think your piece is what is referred to as bog iron. It is very common in Britain and all of Northern Europe, and made up all the iron that was used in the Pre Roman Iron Age, and the later Viking Era. Before being smelted to remove dross, it contains significant carbon and silica, which is WHY your metal is brittle. Check it out. Good Hunting,. Ben
×
×
  • Create New...