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Dubious

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About Dubious

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    Copper Member
  1. I'm afraid of that 5%--the devil is usually in the details Also, there are a lot of objects in the Oort Cloud (to put it mildly), and I believe some theories have it disturbed periodically, sending many winging through the inner solar system. In the fullness of time, it is absolutely certain that a bolide as larger or larger than the one that hit 65 million years ago will again strike the earth (if not stopped). On the explosive force/impact question, you want to consider not only mass, but also velocity and composition (some types would hold together better).
  2. Same order of magnitude for diameters, anyway. A few higher, and you are talking extinction-level events. The one that killed the dinosaurs (including 75% of all species of life on earth) was only 10km or so. Fascinating stuff about the fatalities--did not realize there were actual documented deaths. But easy to see the potential, even with small bolides. The Chelyabinsk Meteorite, if it had held together a few seconds longer, could have taken out a city. Note that astronomers did not see the Chelyabinsk Meteorite coming until it hit (i.e., not at all). Of course, it's easier to spot the larger ones. But, I am pessimistic about the chances of us spotting even a 5-mile rock coming in time to do anything about it.
  3. Be careful what you wish for One of about that size (a bit larger) exploded over Russia in 2013, with the force of 500 KT of TNT--more powerful than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. Fortunately, it exploded 20 miles up and most of the blast was absorbed by the atmosphere. Still, it caused damage and thousands of injuries in the nearby town of Chelyabinsk (most from broken glass). There were surviving pieces to be collected, including a fairly good-sized chunk that fell into a frozen lake. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chelyabinsk_meteor
  4. Dubious

    Took a Hit

    It is completely wrong that the bank didn't step up to the plate, and I'm sorry for your loss. Banks promote credit cards and push their use because they make enormous profit on them. They set the rules. The process requires that security be relaxed to the point that there will be a certain amount of fraud. Banks know this and still promote the use of their credit cards. As the party with the most information and power and the most to gain, they should bear the cost of the fraud involved in the use of cards, which to them is just a small line item. For consumers, banks usually do, as they don't want to scare people away from using cards to buy things on credit. With big businesses, banks also have to be somewhat fair. With small businesses, though, who lack power, I'm afraid it's more murky, and banks play the bully and look for ways to blame the business owner.
  5. Maybe I should come, if I can arrange it. Never been to one.
  6. Have you compared the GM1000's tracking against that of the GM24K? The GM1000's auto tracking system apparently performs quite well, but the GM24K has the new XGB tracking system (over the GMT), and also has nifty manual features such as lock and drag.
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