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Bloodrock

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About Bloodrock

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  1. This seemingly unremarkable specimen when fractured reveals a cache of black glistening pebbles. The contents vary in size; all are smooth, black with traces of white coloring and have a polished appearance. The matrix material has a glass like reflective quality when fractured.
  2. This specimen was identified as a piece of elephant tusk. From the picture does that ID seem accurate?
  3. This isn’t a problem only an inquiry. Is there a tool that enables adding a caption when uploading a picture?
  4. Some time ago I was given a collection of rocks that was put together by a ranger over the course of his career which he gathered during his visits to parks all over the US. I have no clue what many of the specimens are other than some look very cool. I am hoping members with expertise would help me identify so they can be labeled. One foot note the collection was given to me because something in it was emanating high levels of alpha energy (radon gas). There are for to many pieces to put on one posting. If the response is positive several pics will be posted from time to time under the same topic. Thank you
  5. Can this rock be identified? This particular sample is 2.75 x 4" it has a somewhat spherical shape and is quite heavy for its size and very hard. It almost resembles a piece of river rock; however it was encased in solid rock more than 200 feet below the surface. This type of stone can vary in size from less than an inch to well over ton. I have been curious if this type of rock has a name and what process forms them.
  6. The black piece with red spots is a specimen of anthracite coal. An old time line company’s logo was a lump of stove coal with red spots. It was hand painted back in the day by “breaker boys” before child labor laws existed. Kids, breaker boys would sit on wooden planks while coal was sliding down a chute and they would reach down pick up pieces and dab red paint on with a straw brush. This piece came out of an old breaker abandoned long before the second war.
  7. I’m located on the southern tip of the hard coal region adjacent the Blue Mountain with a terrific view of the Hamburg Gap. Today came across this forum and thought it might be nice to share a few pictures of things that were collected over time. I hope others will appreciate the collection. The large piece is probably a big chunk of petrified log.
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