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d_day

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Everything posted by d_day

  1. No problem. Just glad it was an easy one. Most stuff is outer hard to id from photos alone.
  2. Green calcite from Mexico. This material is often mistakenly called onyx, but onyx is a type of agate with alternating black and white layers.
  3. They would, if it were sedimentary. Gneiss would not be, but schist might be. Most schists are metamorphosed sedimentary rocks, but can sometimes be metamorphosed igneous rocks. When there are seasonal layers in sedimentary rocks, they are called varves.
  4. Wait, you think posting a screenshot from Wikipedia, which says that lunar rocks are igneous, somehow proves that lunar rocks are sedimentary? You are either completely delusional, or you’re trolling us. I don’t think you’re trolling us. I am genuinely concerned for your mental health. Please seek professional help immediately.
  5. Best bet would be to find a rock club near you. Not only will they have lots of members willing to share their knowledge with you, most have a shop with all the lapidary equipment you need.
  6. Looks like a nice chunk of a brecciated jasper infilled with chalcedony.
  7. Appears to be some variety of chalcedony.
  8. I’d guess it’s chalcopyrite. Strictly a guess on my part.
  9. Hardness will be between 7 and 7.5. Streak will be white. Specific gravity will be between 2.6 and 2.65. looking at your picture again, I think it looks more like a quartzite rather than agate.
  10. Limestone can exhibit crystals depending on how it formed (e.g. travertine). The others you have that don’t fizz with the vinegar may be heavily abraded agates.
  11. Agree with bigrex on the one in the center. Looks like banded iron formation. Couldn’t say on the other two.
  12. Not a meteorite. It is a heavily weathered septarian nodule.
  13. Sedimentary rocks can be quite porous, particularly those whose deposition is from evaporation, like travertine.
  14. Nothing about those two statements is contradictory.
  15. It can happen to any stone, and can be cemented with virtually any mineral. Pressures on the stone cause it to crack. Mineral laden water seeps through, leaving behind whatever mineral it was carrying, which cements the pieces back together.
  16. Photos are showing now, at least for me. None of those look like petrified wood to me.
  17. Basalt often contains enough magnetite to attract a magnet, but I think you’re right that this is slag.
  18. For starters, meteorites don’t have large bubbles in them, this is a typical feature of slag, and of vesicular basalt. Both can contain enough iron to attract a magnet, which often leads to confusion among beginners and novices since that’s a diagnostic of some types of meteorites. I’m no expert on meteorites, but I’ve seen enough meteor-wrongs of this type to say this is terrestrial in origin.
  19. The layering seen here would rule out coprolite. I’d guess you’ve got some calcite there. It’s very difficult to ID minerals from photos alone, so I can’t be certain.
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