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Redbeard

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Redbeard last won the day on March 3 2014

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  1. Some of you may have known Skip Mendenhall who passed away last Thursday after a long bout with cancer. He was 82 years old and was survived by Sally, his wife of 62 years, and his daughter Charis. Skip was very active in the Roadrunners Prospecting club in the 2000's so many of you may have run into him along the way. He was my old prospecting buddy and like a second father to me. In fact he came into my life just before my father died. We talked several times a week every week and we adopted each other's families. We first met about 20 years ago at Rich Hill and hit it off like we had known each other for ever. It turned out that we had some of the same "secret" patches in the area around Wickenburg so we started going out together. He never had grandchildren so we made sure they had the chance with our daughters and everybody was richer for it. Skip was a kind good man but took no BS from anybody. He gave me lots of good life advice, whether I asked for it or not, but he was almost always right. He adored Sally and Charis and another daughter, Charneth, they had lost to Cystic Fibrosis when she was just a teenager. Skip was still on his feet and working around his house until only a few of weeks before he passed. He never let up. I was able to talk with him in his last hours and he was still 100% sharp and even in his weakened and pain filled state he made some jokes, ordered people around and as I held his shaking hands we talked about the same old crap we always did. He had been trying to give/sell me his quad and trailer for the last couple years but I wouldn't take it because it was a symbol of who he was and a hope that we would get out again. He loved running around in the desert on his quad with his drinking buddies, exploring old town sites, cemeteries and mines. He was worried that Sally would be stuck trying to get rid of all of his crap, so finally, to give him some peace, we made a death bed deal on the quad that made him happy. That was when we both knew it was time to let go. One of my favorite memories of hunting with Skip was when we were cleaning out a trashy wash in which we had both found several nuggets in the past. We agreed that he would work his way down stream and I would go upstream until we met in the middle. It was very trashy but had good gold so we decided to dig every last piece of rusty trash out of there because we knew there were nuggets being hidden in all the noise. Before long the early May temperatures started to rise so Skip decided a couple of beers and a nap in the shade was what he needed (something he often did) and he would let me dig most of the trash. I finally got to his last dig from where I could also see him under the shade tree sleeping, out like a light. I was kinda pissed because he had quit so early and left me to do all the work. I passed my coil over his last half finished only 3" deep dig and it screamed like another big old piece of trash... again. With my boot I scraped off the last 1" of sand on top of the bedrock and staring back at me was a 1/2 oz. slug of shiny gold! I walked over to him and woke him up giving him a mock tongue lashing for making me do all the work then dropped the 1/2 ouncer into his hand. Of course his eyes bugged out and he said, "Where the hell did you find that?" "Out of your last unfinished hole you lazy old man! Dig every target!", I said as I snatched it out of his hand and laughed and laughed. It took him years to get over that one and you can bet I brought it up every chance I had. RIP Old Buddy.
  2. I have a friend who has a couple pounds of mercury he would like to sell. I don’t know how much he wants for it yet but if anybody is interested I’ll ask him.
  3. Sonny wins. Skip is a great guy and has quite a legacy there in Roosevelt County. I was so impressed with him that I wanted to post his photo to let people who are interested in meteorites but haven’t heard of him have a chance to find out about him for themselves. One meteorite he found has been cited in over 100 scientific publications. He witnessed the Portales meteorite fall in 1998. One of those stones hit a barn right behind his house. Those are Roosevelt County meteorites.
  4. I had the great pleasure of meeting him recently.
  5. It was definitely humid but it didn't get wet. It was still the same this morning. I already tried the simple manual reset to FP by holding the on switch at startup. I sent it to Minelab West this morning. Thanks guys.
  6. I was out detecting today and discovered my LCD screen went blank. I can change functions and settings and it beeps appropriately but can't see what they are. The screen is still on but is blank or shows vertical lines. Does anybody know if there is a simple fix? I tried disconnecting the power and switching coils but no luck. If I need it fixed where do I send it? Thanks
  7. Did you find those by sight or with a detector? With all the trash there I can't imagine running a detector.
  8. I went to the City Center Hotel. Lots of good stuff. Bought some fossils, Libyan desert glass and one tiny piece of etched iron meteorite to use for educational purposes. Probably the most impressive thing I saw was a giant soft shell turtle fossil. It was a beautiful specimen but $300,000 was a little out of my budget.
  9. Heading down to check out some meteorites at the Tucson show but don't know where to go to see the most. I'm particularly interested in achondrites. Suggestions? Thanks.
  10. Hey Bill! I've been preoccupied with other things in life for a while but I hope to get back out in the goldfields again this winter. I really miss it. Glad you are out of hibernation. Thanks for all the good things you do for the hobby and nugget hunters. Now you are making liquid gold too!
  11. Mike, I'm not messing with anybody and I'm NOT trying to get in an argument with you or question your expertise. I didn't say it was or was not a meteorite because I wanted to make the point above which I think was very well made. I wasn't trying to "fool people" I was pretty clear about my intention, just getting an opinion to see if anybody would dare say that it actually is a meteorite. If I said it was a meteorite that had been classified it would defeat the whole point. If I had said it was a meteorite initially what would you have said? Would that have changed your opinion? It seems that you still doubt that it is a real meteorite. I sure wouldn't expect you to make the conclusion it is a meteorite from one photo either but you could ask a few questions that might narrow it down. You ask if it has been classified and if I have more photos. Why don't you ask the other people posting photos for more or better photos? That's my whole point. It can be extremely difficult to positively say whether a particular stone is or isn't a meteorite from one low resolution photo on the internet. You looked at my photo and only said, "Nope, sorry." Not, "Can you post a better photo?" or "Is it attracted to a magnet?" or "What color streak does it make?" or "What sort of conditions was it found in?" Just, "Nope sorry." I wonder how many actual meteorites have been tossed out because of an erroneous but definitive statement like, "Nope,sorry." What if somebody posted a photo of an achondrite? I've looked at hundreds of photos of achondrites and many of them are almost indistinguishable from Earth rocks. It is no surprise that there are no lunars from the Americas if people are so quick to toss anything that doesn't look like a "typical" meteorite. I'm just trying to bring some more thoughtfulness and friendliness into these possible meteorite photo posts. I'm sorry if you feel like you have been fooled, that was not my intention. I hoped you and others would give that stone some serious consideration. I think I've been pretty clear about that. To be honest that is the main reason I've bothered to enter this thread. It's just that I've seen so many photos of suspect meteorites get dismissed with no reason or follow up and sometimes people are even insulted and basically run off. It really reflects poorly on the whole field. I'm not the only one who feels like many people in this hobby are not very welcoming to new enthusiasts. What I find especially disturbing is when people are so quick to accuse somebody they have never met of being dishonest and/or ignorant. The name calling and pissing matches going on here and elsewhere are really a bummer. When I first started hunting meteorites I used to come to this forum to learn from "experts" and I feel like I learned a lot from people who truly wanted to help others. I really don't see that happening much anymore and I think that is a shame. People used to be encouraging to newcomers even if they posted a photo of a piece of limestone that they were sure was a meteorite they saw fall over the hill or some other silly story. I am very grateful for the help and advice I received from many people some of whom aren't on this forum anymore. I'd like to see that vibe return here.
  12. Cut it open! The suspense is killing me.
  13. The stone I posted actually is a meteorite which makes my point of how hard they can be to ID just from a photo. Although it definitely meets the "poop brown" criterion. It is not even a particularly odd stone, just another ordinary chondrite. If you saw it in person you would have little doubt. On the other hand I have seen other ordinary chondrites that even when in my hand I wasn't totally convinced. I only engaged in this thread because I think people are often too quick to judge a photo posted by a "newbie" as not being of a meteorite. In this case I have seen meteorites that look similar to the photos posted by the OP, my photo being one example. That's why I suggested he cut his rocks open. Seeing chondrules would pretty well settle it for 85% of meteorites (ordinary chondrites). If there were no chondrules or there were something like quartz crystals inside then he could be pretty sure it wasn't a meteorite. Sure it is unlikely that they are meteorites but the photos alone are not good enough to be sure, but maybe there is something conclusive that I missed. If you look at the thousands of actual meteorite photos on the internet you will find lots of them are pretty poor photos and not particularly diagnostic. I know because I have and I'm constantly frustrated by the poor lighting and detail many photos have. Personally, unless there is something fairly obvious to tell me it definitely isn't a meteorite, like some of the things mentioned in posts above, I like to be a little more cautious about making a conclusive determination either way when looking at a photo on the internet and without additional info. Why not entertain the possibility and have the OP take the next step and cut it open?
  14. I foolishly thought that since it fell to the ground and didn't go of that it was a dud so I picked it up and took photos. I hid it under a tree thinking that I might take it home later for a yard ornament. The YPG guy really freaked out at that suggestion! If it had gone off I would have been in the news and gone out with a bang! I just had to say that.
  15. OK, but I just don't know how you (and many others usually, but you are the only one to respond here) can make such definitive statements from a photo and no other info. Is it just because 99 times out of 100 when people post photos of suspect meteorites they turn out not to be, so you (and most others) are just playing the odds, or is there something that is so obvious about meteorites that they are easy to discriminate from just a single photo? What specifically are you looking for that is missing here? What about it makes it look so clearly like iron ore? To educate myself I've looked at hundreds of meteorite photos and quite a few meteorites in person and have seen that there is a lot of variation in appearance even among ordinary chondrites. I'm not trying to pick a fight here or question your expertise, it's just that it doesn't seem that obvious to me.
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