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clay

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Everything posted by clay

  1. Hutagalung, who was across the street at the time of the incident, said, "I was working on a coffin near the street in front of my house when I heard a booming sound that made my house shake. It was as if a tree had fallen on us." Hutagalung continued: "It was too hot to pick up, so my wife dug it out with a hoe, and we took it inside." Gotta love the Philippines. This was probably just down the road from the giant gold nuggets being found stuck in basalt.
  2. All that black market glaucophane comes across the border hidden in smugglers underwear. I wouldn't put that stuff in my mouth much less where most users consume it. Mistermeaner of Felonme doesn't matter. Some minerals are BAD no matter what the law says. Just say no to bad minerals.
  3. The annual BLM fees on those 4 claims were $5,280. I'm not privy to the GPAA reasons but I imagine that has something to do with it. It looks like the fees weren't paid this year. Maybe it's time to locate your own claim?
  4. Yeah I didn't think they would be good eating. I thought the same thing about lion when I was young but after trying some it's now my favorite wild meat, Ibex is a close second. What didn't you like about wolf meat? What problem? I didn't know I had a problem Bob. Simple or not I'm not sure how you came to the conclusion I have a problem? Maybe you could explain how I misled you into believing there was a problem raised in my post.
  5. I don't know anyone that shoots animals for sport Bob. Not sure why you brought that up? The question was about whether wolves were good eating. Several states have already put in place wolf hunting regulations, they were just waiting for the FWS to finalize the reclassification. You've always been allowed to kill wolves in New Mexico if they are endangering your livestock. My friend Whitey shot the last one in the Gila about 10 years ago when it tried to eat one of his steers. I imagine several people in Montana are right now planning their first legal wolf hunt. There are 567 FWS n
  6. Never tried one myself. Doesn't sound good but it might be worth a shot. It's official. The gray wolf is no longer classified as threatened or endangered. Fire at will.
  7. The circumference is about 72 inches. That would make a pumpkin of about 101 lbs when plump which equals 98 cents - exactly. Lucky for all the other guesses I'm going to have to recuse myself because I have a degree in pumpkin sizing. Please carry on. This is amusing for all us pumpkin professionals.
  8. Troy pounds? I'll stick with the 98 cents - or should I round up to a dollar? Thanks for sharing your pumpkin. Looks like a nice, healthy, plump, non political 98 cent pumpkin.
  9. Hunting is allowed in the Bosque Del Apache as it is in most federal wildlife refuges. There is quite a bit of farming in the Bosque too. The elk tend to overpopulate and eat the fields of corn being grown for the birds. When that happens it's fat elk hunting time! Looks like another elk hunt will be coming up soon in the Bosque. I think the last one was back in 2013. The elk are thick as lice there now. Time to do some thinning. The story posted was about a group of lawyers that are suing the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) which is an agency of the Department of Interior. The Fores
  10. It's not about what I say, it's what the law says. Each valid mining claim location grants ALL the valuable minerals to the claim owner. If there is ore on the ground on a valid mining claim the ore belongs to the claim owner. It doesn't matter if the claim is a lode or placer there are no exceptions to that law. Taking gold from a mining claim you don't own or have permission to mine is theft in every state.
  11. The Pebble mine deposit is a lot bigger than the Russian deposit. 57 billion lb copper, 70 million oz gold, 3.4 billion lb molybdenum and 344 million oz silver. Only Indonesia's Grasberg mine deposit is bigger than Pebble.
  12. Your pictures are "evidence" of Goethite. https://www.mindat.org/gm/2048?page=49 It's not up to readers here to prove you wrong. Your evidence, when subjected to experience and logic, amounts to some cherry picked assumptions about your specimen that you would like us to accept as a valid theory. How about you clearly state your postulation as such and encourage others to consider all possibilities? Or you can stick to your "theory" (almost fact in your mind?) and skip the whole postulation and scientific method thing. The choice, as always, is yours.
  13. Thanks Adam. I knew it couldn't be my eyes deceiving me. Most rock pics don't tell the whole story but this material is so common and familiar to me it seemed obvious. I suspected a little leg pulling was occurring? Sometimes the obvious answer is overlooked. Occam's Razor and all that. (Occam's Razor: "We are to admit no more causes of natural things than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances." Issac Newton or more simply: "when you have two competing theories that make exactly the same predictions, the simpler one is the better." or i
  14. Pershing County does have online recordings. There is no direct link, you have to navigate the Recorders site and learn a slightly different search system. It's slow but they do provide the public records online.
  15. Dave I'm just down the road from you and I see plenty. I caught these two one night last week just strolling by me on my concrete porch while I was stargazing. The quarter is what I catch them with. It's a 2009 Guam "State" quarter. Confuses the H out of them. It's still confusing me. The other one looking on is Amy. She's shy and unlike the other scorpions doesn't go down for quarters. Leigh and I used to manage a working ranch in the Dragoon mountains. The little bark scorpions were thick there. Every morning we'd dump the water supplies for all the critters and refill them with fr
  16. https://www.coloradoindependent.com/2016/02/24/colorado-outlaws-rain-barrels-can-the-ban-be-lifted/ https://extension.colostate.edu/topic-areas/natural-resources/rainwater-collection-colorado-6-707/
  17. Pebble Mines is an American company incorporated in Alaska. They, and their United States subsidiary corporations own the Pebble mine project. They pay taxes in the United States and are subject to Alaska State and United States laws. The Pebble Mines corporation is wholly owned and funded by Northern Dynasty Minerals Limited incorporated in Canada. The Northern Dynasty Minerals Limited company stock is more than 80% owned by United States citizens and corporations who pay United States taxes. If you want to stop foreign funding of U.S. mines you would need to change the U.S. laws an
  18. Those aren't documents Mitchel. They are required action code titles in the BLM mining claim case file system. Most of those action codes only require a submission or completion date be added by the BLM State office to the Serial Register Page for the case file. The documents that initiate those codes are the Mining Claim Location Notice and the Quitclaim/Transfer of Interest. Both those documents are recorded in the County in which the claim is located. Some County Recorders do have online access to copies of those public records. Most Arizona and Nevada County Public Records are av
  19. I agree Slim. It would be cool to load up my battery trays with Lithium. They are lighter, lower maintenance and last a lot longer but at current prices unobtainum for me.
  20. Piedmont stock dropped more than 24% since the Tesla announcement. The Piedmont agreement with Tesla commits all their Lithium estimated resources. Too bad Piedmont doesn't have a mine or a processing plant. All signs point to no chance for Tesla to mine lithium ore for at least another 2 - 8 years. If I were a betting man I'd wager Tesla won't even exist when one of these American companies finally does produce their first ton of lithium carbonate. So far Panasonic produces all of Tesla's batteries but they have announced potential deals with other suppliers. Maybe Tesla will turn a
  21. I think you mean claystone Slim. Claystone is a rock very similar to shale except it breaks into blocks rather than sheets. 10,000 acres of claims would be practically every claystone lithium claim in Nevada. At present no company is actually mining claystone for Lithium but several are getting closer to funding startup plants. Lithium Americas, Cypress and American Lithium being the biggest claim holders in Nevada claystone lithium deposits. All but one of those projects are many years away from any chance of beginning mining. The biggest drawback to mining claystone for lithium is
  22. When a claim is transferred (sold or given) from one owner to another it does not change from one type of claim to another. Neither a transfer of interest nor a claim amendment can change the type of claim from lode to placer. I seriously doubt the Nevada BLM would or could allow the type of mining claim to change from lode to placer. Read the regulations they are quite clear on these points, there is no gray area. The new owners may have relinquished the lode claims and relocated the approximate area as new placer claims but there is no process that could change an existing lode claim in
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