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pairadiceau

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Everything posted by pairadiceau

  1. Cholla cacti at LSD is very easy for a human or dog to tangle with. Painful and time consuming to rectify....
  2. Truck and Trailer gone, Thank you for looking!
  3. Many good points here, I too found gold in Holcomb Valley many years ago. <> Human time, not geological time as in epochs or some such thing. Generally I have found insights offered here by some members to be worthy of serious consideration. I know Adam for example is a respected fellow in the arena of sniffing out placer gold deposits as is his pal Wade I think, and that Bedrock fellow from NM also is a wise and cunning fellow, he has probably forgotten more about iron meteorites and ironing boards than anyone on these here forums, not many NASA veterans on here. ... I would urge you to be open to the insights these fellows may offer, as they have serious credibility with members of this community. Maybe Fred or Mr. Wet/Dry washer will chime in as well and we can drag a few poodles into the conversation... It has been a long day so thank you.
  4. Beans and more beans to go with the excellent smoked meat! Your outings are always great Bill, thanks mucho.
  5. These are photos of the 2006 Dodge Ram, it has some dings, cracked windshield, some instruments not working. The engine fired right up after I charged the batteries has good oil pressure and sounds good. Thanks for lookin and Happy Hunting!
  6. For Sale: 2001 Carson Toy Hauler, 24' overall I could load my Suzuki Samurai in it between the rear door and cabinet. Bumper pull, everything works last time it was used. For the right price a Honda 2000 generator will be included... The pull down bed in the rear was removed to accommodate a custom built queen size bed that my friend built so he could load his salt flats bike in under the bed....DS_Store There are two beds/bench seats on the sides of the trailer which fold down. Last used at the Bonneville Salt Flats, Wendover Ut in 2018.The Dodge was the tow vehicle, from Houston Tx. to Wendover then to Bakersfield where it has been stored since last year. Apparently the truck is a good runner, it is 2wd, large four door cab, has a cracked windshield, drivers side window and some gauges are inoperative. Both vehicles are registered in Texas. I am selling it for his partner because sadly my friend passed away while on the salt last year. They are from New Zealand and she is looking to move the two units, preferably together.... I used the trailer several times going to Az. and Nevada to prospect before I sold it to them in 2017. According to what I have researched these trucks are selling for 15-17K, the toy haulers 6-7K.... The price on them is: Truck $9,800 and Trailer $5,000. For both purchased together the price is: $13,500. Thanks Bill for your help. Please send a message through this site.
  7. Plenty of clearance thus avoiding pesky prop strikes? Waiting patiently to hear it run, it sure looks amazing Dave, great work. Safety first!
  8. Goldseeker4K Congratulations on putting your project together, it certainly looks good, at least the front and rear covers do. I know there is a market for high quality stuff with good content and wish you well going forward. Bob has been known to stir a bit, but he does it with style and grace, so all things considered things could be worse. Carry on.
  9. Fred, Don't you still have your drywall ax handy?
  10. Lanny, Yet another great post, thank you for sharing your adventures with everyone! It certainly sounds like you and your wife are having a sweet adventure! Jeff
  11. Happy Birthday and what Frank said!
  12. Great newsTom, welcome back!!👍🏻
  13. Just saw this, really happy to hear your dad is doing better, he is a great guy!
  14. Hi Dave, This is a great thread and you have done a very workmanlike job, my hat is off to you.... I was recently investigating methods for welding or soldering aluminum and alloys, short of the TIG method what process are you going to be using to put the pieces of the head together? Or are you going to use TIG? Again great job and thank you for bringing us along for the ride, err, pre flight...... Jeff
  15. Hey Chris, Welcome back, I know what you mean about lotsa lead in the Randsburg area.... I have found two small nuggets NW of the town, just about a mile, on the sloping hills... However the bullets and assorted bits of trash are abundant.... I think you will hit a target every three steps or so... Tuesday I was on the Taft Club claims around Benson Canyon on the El Paso side of the valley.... Yep lots of lead, I found an area which someone had raked down and pulled trash off of that site as well... It was however a beautiful day with no wind which is a real boon, and butterflies and hummingbirds were there as well.... All said, not a bad twenty four hours.... Oh yea, the GBll is working great! Zip Zip..... Jeff
  16. Congratulations Don, great to see you back on some gold!
  17. Beautiful work sir! Thank you for sharing with us. Jeff
  18. Nice lookn gold Bill, but why is the cured ham in an ashtray? Jeff
  19. Wishing you a great Birthday Tom!!
  20. Thank you Wikipedia, "Conchoidal fracture", one of very few terms I remember from Physical Geology decades ago...... From Wikipedia, the free Conchoidal fracture Obsidian gives conchoidal fractures Conchoidal fracture in obsidian Conchoidal fracture in flint Conchoidal fracture in glass Conchoidal fracture describes the way that brittle materials break or fracture when they do not follow any natural planes of separation. Mindat.org defines conchoidal fracture as follows "a fracture with smooth, curved surfaces, typically slightly concave, showing concentric undulations resembling the lines of growth of a shell".[1] Materials that break in this way include quartz, chert, flint, quartzite, jasper, and other fine-grained or amorphous materials with a composition of pure silica, such as obsidian and window glass, as well as a few metals, such as solid gallium. Conchoidal fractures can also occur in other materials under favorable circumstances. This material property was widely used in the Stone Age to make sharp tools, and minerals that fractured in this fashion were widely traded as a desirable raw material. Conchoidal fractures often result in a curved breakage surface that resembles the rippling, gradual curves of a mussel shell; the word "conchoid" is derived from the word for this animal (Ancient Greek: κογχοειδής konchoeidēs < κόγχη konchē).[2][3] A swelling appears at the point of impact called the bulb of percussion. Shock waves emanating outwards from this point leave their mark on the stone as ripples. Other conchoidal features include small fissures emanating from the bulb of percussion. They are defined in contrast to the faceted fractures often seen in single crystals such as semiconductor wafers and gemstones, and the high-energy ductile fracture surfaces desirable in most structural applications.[citation needed] Jump to navigationJump to search This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Obsidian gives conchoidal fractures Conchoidal fracture in obsidian Conchoidal fracture in flint Conchoidal fracture in glass Conchoidal fracture describes the way that brittle materials break or fracture when they do not follow any natural planes of separation. Mindat.org defines conchoidal fracture as follows "a fracture with smooth, curved surfaces, typically slightly concave, showing concentric undulations resembling the lines of growth of a shell".[1] Materials that break in this way include quartz, chert, flint, quartzite, jasper, and other fine-grained or amorphous materials with a composition of pure silica, such as obsidian and window glass, as well as a few metals, such as solid gallium. Conchoidal fractures can also occur in other materials under favorable circumstances. This material property was widely used in the Stone Age to make sharp tools, and minerals that fractured in this fashion were widely traded as a desirable raw material. Conchoidal fractures often result in a curved breakage surface that resembles the rippling, gradual curves of a mussel shell; the word "conchoid" is derived from the word for this animal (Ancient Greek: κογχοειδής konchoeidēs < κόγχη konchē).[2][3] A swelling appears at the point of impact called the bulb of percussion. Shock waves emanating outwards from this point leave their mark on the stone as ripples. Other conchoidal features include small fissures emanating from the bulb of percussion. They are defined in contrast to the faceted fractures often seen in single crystals such as semiconductor wafers and gemstones, and the high-energy ductile fracture surfaces desirable in most structural applications.[citation needed]
  21. Arctic Dave, Thank you as well, in my mind I was guessing that the counter clockwise direction would be produce a negative result in the balance scheme, where as turning in a clockwise direction would produce a positive change.... I associate turning a conventionally threaded device to the left, a nut on an angle stop for example where, if one has neglected to shut off the supply preceding said angle stop things will get very exciting and wet shortly, ergo a negative result....... Ahh yes, yet another reason I prefer drywall to plumbing any day.... Again, thank you Martin for your sage advice, I am looking forward to experimenting with this next time out....
  22. Martin, Thank you for your insight on GB2 tuning. I was in the El Pasos recently, (an area I believe you are familiar with) and encountered hot and cold rocks, as well as the usual suspects, lead, steel and brass..... The hot rocks give a signal which is very much like gold I think, not that I have found any of late, and the cold rocks give a null signal which is quite a different sound. Would you please explain the "slightly negative ground balance", would that be turning the fine adjustment a bit counter clockwise from the optimal ground balance position or would that mean turning it a bit in the clockwise direction? I remember vaguely a post somewhere in the distant past explaining this technique so any clarification is appreciated. Thank you, Jeff Martin, That is a great explanation, thank you very much!
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