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pairadiceau

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pairadiceau last won the day on December 8 2013

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About pairadiceau

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  1. pairadiceau

    rocks and minerals

    Thank you Wikipedia, "Conchoidal fracture", one of very few terms I remember from Physical Geology decades ago...... From Wikipedia, the free Conchoidal fracture Obsidian gives conchoidal fractures Conchoidal fracture in obsidian Conchoidal fracture in flint Conchoidal fracture in glass Conchoidal fracture describes the way that brittle materials break or fracture when they do not follow any natural planes of separation. Mindat.org defines conchoidal fracture as follows "a fracture with smooth, curved surfaces, typically slightly concave, showing concentric undulations resembling the lines of growth of a shell".[1] Materials that break in this way include quartz, chert, flint, quartzite, jasper, and other fine-grained or amorphous materials with a composition of pure silica, such as obsidian and window glass, as well as a few metals, such as solid gallium. Conchoidal fractures can also occur in other materials under favorable circumstances. This material property was widely used in the Stone Age to make sharp tools, and minerals that fractured in this fashion were widely traded as a desirable raw material. Conchoidal fractures often result in a curved breakage surface that resembles the rippling, gradual curves of a mussel shell; the word "conchoid" is derived from the word for this animal (Ancient Greek: κογχοειδής konchoeidēs < κόγχη konchē).[2][3] A swelling appears at the point of impact called the bulb of percussion. Shock waves emanating outwards from this point leave their mark on the stone as ripples. Other conchoidal features include small fissures emanating from the bulb of percussion. They are defined in contrast to the faceted fractures often seen in single crystals such as semiconductor wafers and gemstones, and the high-energy ductile fracture surfaces desirable in most structural applications.[citation needed] Jump to navigationJump to search This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Obsidian gives conchoidal fractures Conchoidal fracture in obsidian Conchoidal fracture in flint Conchoidal fracture in glass Conchoidal fracture describes the way that brittle materials break or fracture when they do not follow any natural planes of separation. Mindat.org defines conchoidal fracture as follows "a fracture with smooth, curved surfaces, typically slightly concave, showing concentric undulations resembling the lines of growth of a shell".[1] Materials that break in this way include quartz, chert, flint, quartzite, jasper, and other fine-grained or amorphous materials with a composition of pure silica, such as obsidian and window glass, as well as a few metals, such as solid gallium. Conchoidal fractures can also occur in other materials under favorable circumstances. This material property was widely used in the Stone Age to make sharp tools, and minerals that fractured in this fashion were widely traded as a desirable raw material. Conchoidal fractures often result in a curved breakage surface that resembles the rippling, gradual curves of a mussel shell; the word "conchoid" is derived from the word for this animal (Ancient Greek: κογχοειδής konchoeidēs < κόγχη konchē).[2][3] A swelling appears at the point of impact called the bulb of percussion. Shock waves emanating outwards from this point leave their mark on the stone as ripples. Other conchoidal features include small fissures emanating from the bulb of percussion. They are defined in contrast to the faceted fractures often seen in single crystals such as semiconductor wafers and gemstones, and the high-energy ductile fracture surfaces desirable in most structural applications.[citation needed]
  2. pairadiceau

    Micros with the GB2

    Arctic Dave, Thank you as well, in my mind I was guessing that the counter clockwise direction would be produce a negative result in the balance scheme, where as turning in a clockwise direction would produce a positive change.... I associate turning a conventionally threaded device to the left, a nut on an angle stop for example where, if one has neglected to shut off the supply preceding said angle stop things will get very exciting and wet shortly, ergo a negative result....... Ahh yes, yet another reason I prefer drywall to plumbing any day.... Again, thank you Martin for your sage advice, I am looking forward to experimenting with this next time out....
  3. pairadiceau

    Micros with the GB2

    Martin, Thank you for your insight on GB2 tuning. I was in the El Pasos recently, (an area I believe you are familiar with) and encountered hot and cold rocks, as well as the usual suspects, lead, steel and brass..... The hot rocks give a signal which is very much like gold I think, not that I have found any of late, and the cold rocks give a null signal which is quite a different sound. Would you please explain the "slightly negative ground balance", would that be turning the fine adjustment a bit counter clockwise from the optimal ground balance position or would that mean turning it a bit in the clockwise direction? I remember vaguely a post somewhere in the distant past explaining this technique so any clarification is appreciated. Thank you, Jeff Martin, That is a great explanation, thank you very much!
  4. pairadiceau

    Micros with the GB2

    Martin, Thank you for your insight on GB2 tuning. I was in the El Pasos recently, (an area I believe you are familiar with) and encountered hot and cold rocks, as well as the usual suspects, lead, steel and brass..... The hot rocks give a signal which is very much like gold I think, not that I have found any of late, and the cold rocks give a null signal which is quite a different sound. Would you please explain the "slightly negative ground balance", would that be turning the fine adjustment a bit counter clockwise from the optimal ground balance position or would that mean turning it a bit in the clockwise direction? I remember vaguely a post somewhere in the distant past explaining this technique so any clarification is appreciated. Thank you, Jeff
  5. John B., a long time and world famous meteorite hunter knows a great deal about finding meteorites in Oman and other locations as well.... Maybe he will see your post and respond with his wisdom. Good hunting!
  6. pairadiceau

    100 year old artifacts?

    A couple of you fellows are doing a thorough and precise examination of the assertions in this thread, your logic, conclusions, and communication skills are to be admired. My sombrero is off to you. Thank you for your patience and diligent observations. Etc..... Signed: An Hombre or native or something......
  7. pairadiceau

    For The Photographers in the Forum

    Great shots Terry, thanks for posting!
  8. pairadiceau

    Working on the YOTO

    Very nice work Tom, Are those round discs on the doors Neodymium magnets ? They are sure handy for everything from pictures on the fridge to gas tank fill door latches... I think I got a bunch of various sizes from the "Gauss Boys" years ago. Had fun with a big one under a table top in a restaurant moving a knife across the table, had the waitress going for a while.... Great job thank you for posting the inspiration. If anybody has an old hard drive the magnets in them are scary strong, my old one broke in half and I still have half stuck to a Bunkster pick.
  9. pairadiceau

    Prospecting Rig Help

    Slim and Fred make good points, they are capable off road vehicles, not too fast but who wants to go fast over the kind of terrain you will be in anyway.... About the stopping every two hundred miles and running the engine, that has to do with providing lubrication to a particular transmission bearing which is not being lubricated when towed, but the procedure is well explained on some posts on the Suzuki forum.... Just need to check it out... I know Walt the Whiz also is a fan of the Samurai.... They are fun and dependable enough if mechanically sound and operated reasonably... Have fun!!!
  10. pairadiceau

    Please help fro my Daddy...

    Good job Rocky, You are doing a wonderful thing for this man and his father. You're generosity and compassion for this fellow are inspiring!! I tip my sombrero to you! Thanks for sharing this story with us and continued success and happiness to you. Jeff
  11. pairadiceau

    Good Hunt Today

    Excellent and important tip regarding the critter. I saw one recently in the El Paso’s, had a brief chat and moved on. One can’t waste ones energy or time when doin lead removal.... thank you Bob
  12. pairadiceau

    "Clay talks about fires and stuff"!!!

    Si, great guitar and lyrics. Thank you for sharing it.... Kosher tacos..... and the strange jux toe positrons just keep rolling in.
  13. pairadiceau

    Happy Birthday Pairadiceau

    Thanks guys, don’t melt down over there, looking forward to seeing the crew this fall.... great folks in the big Az!!
  14. pairadiceau

    "Clay talks about fires and stuff"!!!

    Bob, I was catching up on probably the greatest thread I have seen in a long time, (even with an ever changing name) and noticed you mentioned Reserve. Reserve NM I presume. If that is the Reserve you are speaking of I had the good fortune of visiting there a couple of years ago to pick up a diesel powered Samurai from a very interesting wrench bender there.... My friend and I walked into the small cafe for breakfast and we were both amazed at the warm and friendly greetings we received from the locals.... A woman came by our table and filled up our coffee cups and when as we left I saw her outside and thanked her again, turns out she was not an employee but just a local being a kind soul.... The country is breathtakingly beautiful and the people we talked to were great..... I gotta go pop some more popcorn so I can continue the top notch banter here. Jeff
  15. pairadiceau

    Beat the heat retreat

    Thanks for posting the great photos Tom, looks like good times with good people!
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