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billpeters

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Everything posted by billpeters

  1. Here's a reprint of my Kenyan friend post and my ending to Seasoned Meteorite Hunter: Jamalito, All your rocks are not meteorites except, possibly, the very large red one you are standing next to. It is so great to see your smile. We have missed you around here. I may be looking to pick up some more of that special lunar meteorite mortar blend you sell to make my next batch New World Authenticated lunar meteorites. We need some new NWA lunars around here. Cheers! billpeters May the food critics be accurate, but kind. Cheers! billpeters
  2. Fredmason, Actually, I write these off in a flash because I feel passionate about it. My exception is the oft repeated standard explanation of meteorite characteristics for the newbies. billpeters
  3. Flight Characteristics of Meteorites, Most people who find an unusual rock they think is a meteorite typically think it is from Mars or the Moon and worth tens of millions of dollars. There is always a fall story, usually embellished with seeing it fall from the sky with a blinding light right near them and going out and finding a new rock often burning hot or too hot to touch at the bottom of a crater. It's wishful thinking. It is not what happens when a rock falls from space. Meteorites do not make holes, they don't burn, they don't light up from friction, and you won't see one shooting trail across the sky going all the way to the ground near you. Meteorites do not make holes. They land at the same speed as if you had dropped the same sized rock for a Cessna airplane. Each rock or meteorite would slow to it's terminal velocity based on air resistance. A bowling ball, or your rock, would slow to about 200 MPH. When it hit the ground it might break, or dent asphalt, but it would not make a crater. The terminal velocity of smaller stones is even lower. Galileo be damned. It would take a single stone the size of an eight passenger van to maintain enough velocity to make a crater as had occurred in Carancas, Peru, 27 Sep 2007. Meteorites come in at hypersonic 25,000 to 40,000 MPH velocities. At just below 60 miles high the air compacts at the front of the rock by ram pressure. The air itself becomes charged and fluorescences in brilliant light immediately expanding outward from the incoming meteor along its streak, which is actually what everyone sees when they see a meteor shoot across the sky. Think about it. The typical meteor is the size of a grain of rice. You can't see that 60 miles up. I don't care how bright it is. I repeat. What you are actually seeing is the instantaneously fluorescent atmosphere created by ram pressure along the meteor's path and not the actual rock. That same ram pressure heats up the outer surface and ablates (shatters) the meteor. Most are disintegrated and go off at about to 40 miles high. The very rare bollide that could produce a strewnfield of stones on the ground will go dark at about 35 to 25 miles high. All meteors will go dark after they drop below about 4500 MPH as they will no longer be enough pressure to produce light. Dark flight begins in the lower atmosphere as the meteorites continue to decelerate, but now producing sonic booms. They drop subsonic below 40 to 25 miles high. The trail of stones will become quite long with larger ones traveling farther that smaller fragments. When they reach terminal velocity for that sized stone they will lose nearly all of their forward momentum and drop nearly straight down being buffeted by the jet stream and atmospheric winds. The interior temperature of meteoriods in space is about -250 F. In the lower atmosphere the just-heated outer surface of incoming meteorites are blasted and chilled by the -60F of ever thickening air. Just fallen meteorites are usually warm to the touch, but not too hot to touch. Sometimes larger ones are icy cold as the interior re-chills the surface. The cannot start fires, in spite of the promulgated dubious Wisconsin-Chicago fire theory. (You should read my tutorial, "How to make a landing site for a meteorite." 31 Jan 31 2019.) Fresh meteorite falls are found on top of the ground by eyesight or by a magnet stick. Old falls containing larger stones or irons are buried much deeper and are often found by metal detectors. The reason that older fall meteorites are buried is normally not because they made a crater that deep, but that being much denser than the surrounding soil and boulders they sink slowly due to settling over the centuries. (See the depth of the Civil War bullets in my "Not Everything that Pings is a Meteorite" article 18 Dec 2018.) Cheers! billpeters
  4. Popac, Most people who find an unusual rock they think is a meteorite typically think it is from Mars or the Moon and worth tens of millions of dollars. There is always a fall story, usually embellished with seeing it fall from the sky with a blinding light right near them and going out and finding a new rock often burning hot or too hot to had touch at the bottom of a crater. It's wishful thinking. It is not what happens when a rock falls from space. Meteorites do not make holes, they don't burn, they don't light up from friction, and you won't see one shooting trail across the sky going all the way to the ground near you. Meteorites do not make holes. They land at the same speed as if you had dropped the same sized rock for a Cessna airplane. Each rock or meteorite would slow to it's terminal velocity based on air resistance. A bowling ball, or your rock, would slow to about 200 MPH. When it hit the ground it might break, or dent asphalt, but it would not make a crater. The terminal velocity of smaller stones is even lower. Galileo be damned. It would take a single stone the size of an eight passenger van to maintain enough velocity to make a crater as had occurred in Carancas, Peru, 27 Sep 2007. Meteorites come in at hypersonic 25,000 to 40,000 MPH velocities. At just below 60 miles high the air compacts at the front of the rock by ram pressure. The air itself becomes charged and fluorescences in brilliant light immediately expanding outward from the incoming meteor along its streak, which is actually what everyone sees when they see a meteor shoot across the sky. Think about it. The typical meteor is the size of a grain of rice. You can't see that 60 miles up. I don't care how bright it is. I repeat. What you are actually seeing is the instantaneously fluorescent atmosphere created by ram pressure along the meteor's path and not the actual rock. That same ram pressure heats up the outer surface and ablates (shatters) the meteor. Most are disintegrated and go off at about to 40 miles high. The very rare bollide that could produce a strewnfield of stones on the ground will go dark at about 35 to 25 miles high. All meteors will go dark after they drop below about 4500 MPH as they will no longer be enough pressure to produce light. Dark flight begins in the lower atmosphere as the meteorites continue to decelerate, but now producing sonic booms. They drop subsonic below 40 to 25 miles high. The trail of stones will become quite long with larger ones traveling farther that smaller fragments. When they reach terminal velocity for that sized stone they will lose nearly all of their forward momentum and drop nearly straight down being buffeted by the jet stream and atmospheric winds. The interior temperature of meteoriods in space is about -250 F. In the lower atmosphere the just-heated outer surface of incoming meteorites are blasted and chilled by the -60F of ever thickening air. Just fallen meteorites are usually warm to the touch, but not too hot to touch. Sometimes larger ones are icy cold as the interior re-chills the surface. The cannot start fires, in spite of the promulgated dubious Wisconsin-Chicago fire theory. (You should read my tutorial, "How to make a landing site for a meteorite." 31 Jan 31 2019.) Fresh meteorite falls are found on top of the ground by eyesight or by a magnet stick. Old falls containing larger stones or irons are buried much deeper and are often found by metal detectors. The reason that older fall meteorites are buried is normally not because they made a crater that deep, but that being much denser than the surrounding soil and boulders they sink slowly due to settling over the centuries. (See the depth of the Civil War bullets in my "Not Everything that Pings is a Meteorite" article 18 Dec 2018.) Cheers! billpeters
  5. Dsvilko, Labs everywhere are being inundated with meteorites for classification. Therefore, most of them are turning down common L and H stoneys and only classifying and publishing Martians, Lunars and other unique and rare classifications. NWAs are commonplace and not worth the time for most labs. The exception is if it is a new fall, or a new same country, or same US state find. Statistical analysis from the Met Bulletin is no longer a valid representation of actual distribution. A quick guide is that stoneys are 90%, Pallasites are 6%, irons are 3.5% and the Martians, Lunars, and others are below 0.1%. Razumiješ? billpeters
  6. Warning, I have gone out these past two weekends. The desert is covered in flowers and other vegetation due to the heavy, continuous rains and snows. This is NOT a good time to hunt for meteorites. billpeters
  7. Jamalito, All your rocks are not meteorites except, possibly, the very large red one you are standing next to. It is so great to see your smile. We have missed you around here. I may be looking to pick up some more of that special lunar meteorite mortar blend you sell to make my next batch New World Authenticated lunar meteorites. We need some new NWA lunars around here. Cheers! billpeters
  8. I find Seasoned's Obvious Skew a delectable delight in the field of meteorites. Few others give us such an exquisite opportunity to tempt the palate. He teases us first with a quick view and sensual aroma of his main meteorite skew cooked to bubbly perfection to tickle our taste senses. You could tell right away by its texture, swirls, and iridescent coloration that is is going to feast to remember. But then he backtracks by presenting us his word salad appetizer as a tasty first treat. And now the gathering awaits with eager anticipation the full experience of the main skew seasoned by his best presentation. May the food critics be accurate, but kind. Cheers! billpeters
  9. Your pic looks like extremely common slag. I have seen mountains of it many times. It is cheaper than salt and easier to spread on the winter roads without damaging plants. Cheers! billpeters
  10. First time I've ever said this. Your pics are too close. We need to see the entire rock. Could you also include crisp pics a little farther out, please? billpeters
  11. Ernest Hemingway wrote “The Old Man and the Sea” while living in Cuba about a poor fisherman, named Santiago, who has a string of bad luck fishing for his livelihood. On his 84th day he set out deep into the Gulf Stream of Mexico and finally hooked a world record marlin. Twenty years ago I set out to find a new fall in Arizona. I interviewed dozens of people miles apart who all independently triangulated to the same location. I spend 52 days over the years combing that area in ever widening, carefully searched grids to no avail. Finally, reviewing weather radar data, others located the strewnfield 15 miles away and began recovering stones. I changed course and continued searching for another 14 days over the new strewnfield and still have found nothing. No one has ever found the main mass, but now I think I have identified a reasonably small grid for a detailed search. I figure my highest probability of success of my grid will be in days 3 to 6 with a maximum of 18 days to complete a fully extended search area. Santiago found his success when he persevered to the end. I intend to do the same, even if it takes 84 days. Cheers! billpeters
  12. It is called a leaverite. Leave it on the table, but don't call it a meteorite. Take a look at your rock(s). If it glistens like a crystal structure (ie: quartz) at any point in the rock it can’t be a meteorite. If it has layers, it can’t be a meteorite, it’s sedimentary. If it has small gas bubbles in it, it can’t be a meteorite. It’s basalt. If it is moderately magnetic it is not a meteorite. If there is a thick crust on it, it can’t be a meteorite. File off a corner or cut it. It won’t diminish it’s value. If there is all bright silvery metal it can’t be a meteorite. If it is all grey metal it can’t be a meteorite. If there is black crust as thin as a fingernail, and crazing on the outside of the rock, it might be a meteorite. If there are small silver specks visible in the filed off section, it might be meteorite. There are billions of magnetic rocks in the US, none of which are meteorites. Anyone can find magnetic earth stones nearly everywhere. Just take a strong magnet and drop into sand and you will see what I mean. Check our O Richard Norton’s, “Rocks from Space” or visit the ASU Meteorite Center. billpeters
  13. Warning, It may not be (assuming it is not an already known purchased meteorite specimen). I picked up one found in AZ by an elderly gentleman heavily magnetic which looking very much like a mesosiderite. Reuben Garcia was able to visually discern that it wasn't. I took it to Blaine Reed with his analysis 'gun' who confirmed that it definitely was not a meteorite. Steelguy's rock really looks very much like an amazing iron, but professional analysis and documentation is required. billpeters
  14. Missy, They are all certainly not meteorites. They look basaltic. Iron in rocks is very common and not a good indicator alone of a meteorite. Take a look at your rock(s). If it glistens like a crystal structure (ie: quartz) at any point in the rock it can’t be a meteorite. If it has layers, it can’t be a meteorite, it’s sedimentary. If it has small gas bubbles in it, it can’t be a meteorite. It’s basalt. If it is moderately magnetic it is not a meteorite. If there is a thick crust on it, it can’t be a meteorite. File off a corner or cut it. It won’t diminish it’s value. If there is all bright silvery metal it can’t be a meteorite. If it is all grey metal it can’t be a meteorite. If there is black crust as thin as a fingernail, and crazing on the outside of the rock, it might be a meteorite. If there are small silver specks visible in the filed off section, it might be meteorite. There are billions of magnetic rocks in the US, none of which are meteorites. Anyone can find magnetic earth stones nearly everywhere. Just take a strong magnet and drop into sand and you will see what I mean. Check our O Richard Norton’s, “Rocks from Space” or visit the ASU Meteorite Center or similar meteorite display venue. Keep looking down. They are are out there. Cheers! billpeters
  15. Mortlock, There is no published report of a mesosiderite find in Indiana in the Met Bulletin. There were no significant fireball reports in Indiana this year either. Of the 13 finds known in Indiana four were falls and none were mesosiderates over the last 160 years. Only Mike farmer was able to attain Cuba new fall stone(s) for sale and show and tell at the Tucson Gem show that I know of. No one discussed an Indiana new mesosiderite find in my presence, but that is not saying much. billpeters
  16. Futu, Your first rock is common sedimentary brecciated with multiple inclusions. It is worthless. The second rock is also not a meteorite. You might get five or ten bucks with good marketing if you can identify properly what it is. Take a look at your rock(s). If it glistens like a crystal structure (ie: quartz) at any point in the rock it can’t be a meteorite. If it has layers, it can’t be a meteorite, it’s sedimentary. If it has small gas bubbles in it, it can’t be a meteorite. It’s basalt. If it is moderately magnetic it is not a meteorite. If there is a thick crust on it, it can’t be a meteorite. File off a corner or cut it. It won’t diminish it’s value. If there is all bright silvery metal it can’t be a meteorite. If it is all grey metal it can’t be a meteorite. If there is black crust as thin as a fingernail, and crazing on the outside of the rock, it might be a meteorite. If there are small silver specks visible in the filed off section, it might be meteorite. There are billions of magnetic rocks in the US, none of which are meteorites. Anyone can find magnetic earth stones nearly everywhere. Just take a strong magnet and drop into sand and you will see what I mean. Check our O Richard Norton’s, “Rocks from Space” or visit the ASU Meteorite Center or similar meteorite display venue. Keep looking down. They are are out there. Cheers! billpeters
  17. I met Rocky at the IMCA dinner. He is a cool, handsome young guy. Obviously, he was stoked about his find showing off pieces of his just published Barnstable find and meeting other avid hunters and collectors. I was one of the very first people to buy a piece from him to add to my collection for my talks and show and tell. I'll add pics of us when I have the time. billpeters
  18. Works all the time. If you build it, they will come. Enjoy! billpeters
  19. Just as a professional golfer knows exactly where the hole is to be placed for that perfect shot and a pro basketball player knows the precise positioning of the hoop, so an experienced meteorite hunter knows the best way to set up a crater for a meteorite to strike. A well planned crater is essential for a new meteorite fall. Rocks from space look for good craters in which to land, just like a bird looks for the perfect site to build a nest. You have to determine in advance the size of the crater needed to attract your target. It is is too big they will fly right by and ignore it. The same if it is way too small as it won't be recognized or seem attractive enough. You had better to stick to a relatively smaller size though. Don't try to get that rare eagle rock when sparrow stones are plentiful. If this will be your first attempt it would be good to start by digging a round hole about a 18 to 24 inches across that's about eight inches deep in a hard dirt patch of ground. Be sure to blacken the surrounding ground as this enhances the attractiveness of the crater. Now here is the key. The only way your are going to truly attract a falling meteorite is if you set up a slow burning fire in its base that is totally out of place. They have to spot it all the way up in space. The fire in the bottom of a dirt crater makes it visible and stand out like nothing else around. A petroleum product, like a good kerosene or long burning liquid paraffin oil, works well. Get it lit with absolutely no other man made flammables around as that makes it look just like an ordinary fire and it will surely be ignored. Once lit get out of site, but stay nearby like a hunter in her blind. Meteorites always want to completely surprise people. If they know you are suspecting they will come they will never ever land nearby. Once you do hear them come in to roost give them time to settle in. A video camera is an absolute must to show off your find. They are really not camera shy and love attention. So, post, post, post! Show it everywhere, youtube, instagram, facebook. Call all the local TV news networks to get it on local and national news. Your little meteorite guy will be famous and you will get all of the credit. Please watch the entire youtube video to see a successful crater and recovery. https://www.adventuresportsnetwork.com/random/man-claims-found-burning-meteorite-yard-real-video/ The burning crater with the new fallen meteorite is below. Now you too can build your own meteorite landing site crater. Enjoy! billpeters
  20. Thanks Wet/dry, I'll write a story with my experiences about this. Enjoy later, billpeters
  21. That's an amazing find! Congratulations! billpeters
  22. There is no connection to the seven state fireball event seen in New Jersey and this sandpit. That bollide began just south of the State of New Jersey just off the coast of Maryland heading nearly due south and terminated further over the ocean off of the Virginia coast. Finding a worn down sandpit dug the day before above the tide line with somebody's cool rock find in it is hardly worth reporting. See: https://www.amsmeteors.org/members/imo_view/event/2019/31 Of course, if there were an astronaut in it, then it is a different story. billpeters
  23. Hey all you ICMA members. I still one more recommendation. My meteorite bio is in the last post. Thanks in advance. billpeters P.S.: If you want to hook up at the Tucson Gem Show I'm game.
  24. Most of the craters on beaches are caused by objects falling from space. I once found an astronaut in a crater at Santa Monica beach who fell to Earth after his tether broke while doing EVA on the International Space Station . Fortunately, he was alright. Cheers! billpeters
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