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billpeters

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billpeters last won the day on January 19

billpeters had the most liked content!

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About billpeters

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    Silver Member
  • Birthday December 28

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Gilbert, AZ
  • Interests
    Meteorite hunting, astronomy-observing transient phenomena, Christian apologetics, China, linguistics expert, world traveler

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  1. Mortlock, There is no published report of a mesosiderite find in Indiana in the Met Bulletin. There were no significant fireball reports in Indiana this year either. Of the 13 finds known in Indiana four were falls and none were mesosiderates over the last 160 years. Only Mike farmer was able to attain Cuba new fall stone(s) for sale and show and tell at the Tucson Gem show that I know of. No one discussed an Indiana new mesosiderite find in my presence, but that is not saying much. billpeters
  2. Futu, Your first rock is common sedimentary brecciated with multiple inclusions. It is worthless. The second rock is also not a meteorite. You might get five or ten bucks with good marketing if you can identify properly what it is. Take a look at your rock(s). If it glistens like a crystal structure (ie: quartz) at any point in the rock it can’t be a meteorite. If it has layers, it can’t be a meteorite, it’s sedimentary. If it has small gas bubbles in it, it can’t be a meteorite. It’s basalt. If it is moderately magnetic it is not a meteorite. If there is a thick crust on it, it can’t be a meteorite. File off a corner or cut it. It won’t diminish it’s value. If there is all bright silvery metal it can’t be a meteorite. If it is all grey metal it can’t be a meteorite. If there is black crust as thin as a fingernail, and crazing on the outside of the rock, it might be a meteorite. If there are small silver specks visible in the filed off section, it might be meteorite. There are billions of magnetic rocks in the US, none of which are meteorites. Anyone can find magnetic earth stones nearly everywhere. Just take a strong magnet and drop into sand and you will see what I mean. Check our O Richard Norton’s, “Rocks from Space” or visit the ASU Meteorite Center or similar meteorite display venue. Keep looking down. They are are out there. Cheers! billpeters
  3. I met Rocky at the IMCA dinner. He is a cool, handsome young guy. Obviously, he was stoked about his find showing off pieces of his just published Barnstable find and meeting other avid hunters and collectors. I was one of the very first people to buy a piece from him to add to my collection for my talks and show and tell. I'll add pics of us when I have the time. billpeters
  4. Works all the time. If you build it, they will come. Enjoy! billpeters
  5. Just as a professional golfer knows exactly where the hole is to be placed for that perfect shot and a pro basketball player knows the precise positioning of the hoop, so an experienced meteorite hunter knows the best way to set up a crater for a meteorite to strike. A well planned crater is essential for a new meteorite fall. Rocks from space look for good craters in which to land, just like a bird looks for the perfect site to build a nest. You have to determine in advance the size of the crater needed to attract your target. It is is too big they will fly right by and ignore it. The same if it is way too small as it won't be recognized or seem attractive enough. You had better to stick to a relatively smaller size though. Don't try to get that rare eagle rock when sparrow stones are plentiful. If this will be your first attempt it would be good to start by digging a round hole about a 18 to 24 inches across that's about eight inches deep in a hard dirt patch of ground. Be sure to blacken the surrounding ground as this enhances the attractiveness of the crater. Now here is the key. The only way your are going to truly attract a falling meteorite is if you set up a slow burning fire in its base that is totally out of place. They have to spot it all the way up in space. The fire in the bottom of a dirt crater makes it visible and stand out like nothing else around. A petroleum product, like a good kerosene or long burning liquid paraffin oil, works well. Get it lit with absolutely no other man made flammables around as that makes it look just like an ordinary fire and it will surely be ignored. Once lit get out of site, but stay nearby like a hunter in her blind. Meteorites always want to completely surprise people. If they know you are suspecting they will come they will never ever land nearby. Once you do hear them come in to roost give them time to settle in. A video camera is an absolute must to show off your find. They are really not camera shy and love attention. So, post, post, post! Show it everywhere, youtube, instagram, facebook. Call all the local TV news networks to get it on local and national news. Your little meteorite guy will be famous and you will get all of the credit. Please watch the entire youtube video to see a successful crater and recovery. https://www.adventuresportsnetwork.com/random/man-claims-found-burning-meteorite-yard-real-video/ The burning crater with the new fallen meteorite is below. Now you too can build your own meteorite landing site crater. Enjoy! billpeters
  6. Thanks Wet/dry, I'll write a story with my experiences about this. Enjoy later, billpeters
  7. That's an amazing find! Congratulations! billpeters
  8. billpeters

    Odd Meteorwrong Article

    There is no connection to the seven state fireball event seen in New Jersey and this sandpit. That bollide began just south of the State of New Jersey just off the coast of Maryland heading nearly due south and terminated further over the ocean off of the Virginia coast. Finding a worn down sandpit dug the day before above the tide line with somebody's cool rock find in it is hardly worth reporting. See: https://www.amsmeteors.org/members/imo_view/event/2019/31 Of course, if there were an astronaut in it, then it is a different story. billpeters
  9. billpeters

    IMCA recommendation

    Hey all you ICMA members. I still one more recommendation. My meteorite bio is in the last post. Thanks in advance. billpeters P.S.: If you want to hook up at the Tucson Gem Show I'm game.
  10. billpeters

    Odd Meteorwrong Article

    Most of the craters on beaches are caused by objects falling from space. I once found an astronaut in a crater at Santa Monica beach who fell to Earth after his tether broke while doing EVA on the International Space Station . Fortunately, he was alright. Cheers! billpeters
  11. billpeters

    IMCA recommendation

    All, I've been hunting meteorites since the Indian Butte Meteorite fall of 1997 in south central Arizona. I have hunted all over Arizona, California, and Southern Nevada and have found meteorites and in three other countries for about 800 hours. I have volunteered for years in public elementary and middle schools teaching science classes on meteorites by having all the students handle and test the various types of meteorites per small table group. I teach a second class on the real night sky as to what the many objects and events these kids can easily see in the night sky by themselves or with a small telescope. The Meteoritical Bulletin published my Danby Dry Lake find. I have observed 20,489 meteors and understand their characteristics. I have built a 12.5" in Dobsonian telescope. My collection is in the hundreds. billpeters
  12. Hey all you IMCA members on the forum who know me mostly from my posts. I am looking for a couple of you of give me a recommendation to the IMCA so that I could join their membership. The requirements are that I receive two member recommendations before my application can be considered. I am the guy who posts about how to id meteorites from meteor-wrongs, 'how to make authentic martians', 'melted wood (from meteorites) makes the best wood' and other whimsical tales. Since I run my own real world business I don't often get to mingle with the real meteorite hunters' crowd, except at the annual Tucson Gem Show in late January and early February. I look forward to attending the annual IMCA dinner, but cannot easily without being a member. I would like to become a full fledged member so that I can participate with like compatriots. I go down on several different days as it is less than two hours away from Gilbert, AZ and could meet up with you there. If you would like to give a recommendation send it directly to recommend@imca.cc and send me a private message. Keep looking down, they're out there. billpeters
  13. billpeters

    N.E. Ohio potential meteorites?

    Lala, All your rocks are terrestrial sedimentary, including the last three. The weathered surfaces are typical of terrestrial stones and unlike meteoritic crust. There are no igneous stones in your collection. The water accretions on some of your stones probably occurred when Lake Erie was several times larger and 100s of feet deeper covering Strongsville, OH or perhaps water covered several million years prior or both. Read more and handle real meteorites. Take a few stones, chips, or pics to a geology dept. Don't tell them that you think they are meteorites, just ask them what type of rocks they are. I believe that you will get a straight answer. You are correct in writing, "I get that we see what we want to see", but others don't see it. billpeters
  14. billpeters

    N.E. Ohio potential meteorites?

    Lala, I am from NE Ohio (Bedford). None of your rocks are even close. They are sedimentary and heavily water influenced. Take a look at your rock(s). If it glistens like a crystal structure (ie: quartz) at any point in the rock it can’t be a meteorite. If it has layers, it can’t be a meteorite, it’s sedimentary. If it has small gas bubbles in it, it can’t be a meteorite. It’s basalt. If it is moderately magnetic it is not a meteorite. If there is a thick crust on it, it can’t be a meteorite. File off a corner or cut it. It won’t diminish it’s value. If there is all bright silvery metal it can’t be a meteorite. If it is all grey metal it can’t be a meteorite. If there is black crust as thin as a fingernail, and crazing on the outside of the rock, it might be a meteorite. If there are small silver specks visible in the filed off section, it might be meteorite. There are billions of magnetic rocks in the US, none of which are meteorites. Anyone can find magnetic earth stones nearly everywhere. Just take a strong magnet and drop into sand and you will see what I mean. Check our O Richard Norton’s, “Rocks from Space” or visit the Cleveland Museum of Natural History or similar center. billpeters
  15. Not everything that pings is a meteorite. A few years ago while visiting my mother for Christmas I searched for the Richmond, VA meteorite fall of 1828. It was utterly hopeless hunting a very low iron LL5 in the suburban woods of Richmond. The woods trash had bits of wire, endless small ancient rubbish, and modern stuff buried under the leaves. I decided I would piddle around with my Whites detector, cover a small area, and call it quits. Low and behold I got a hit for a 'bullet'. In 400 year old Richmond, what a surprise. I dug through 4 inches of leaves, 12 inches of endlessly enmeshed roots wrapped around dozens of gritty small and large stones in wet, cold black December dirt. Then I dug through 5 more inches of very light, yellowish clay equally enmeshed in roots and rock to find a civil war lead bullet in perfect condition. I found 21 more civil war lead bullets that morning. It must have been an encampment where a bag had spilled or broke. It was an amazing find to pick at random 400 sq. ft. of earth and find a civil war encampment.
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