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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/18/2019 in Posts

  1. 14 points
    I know I totally stole the word "dink/dinkster" from @adam and @boulder dash. It is the perfect adjective to describe the nuggets Ive found though. So here is the pic of the dinkster I found today with Leverite.
  2. 9 points
    Welp, another great outing under the belt. Had about 20 people show up. Mostly the old corp. group. Did have some new people though and that was great. Weather was over all nice temp wise...but as you know the Q can get windy! Had a great pot luck on Sat. River stix was kind enough to bring 16 boneless rib eyes, caviar, cheeses and dips for everyone and there were a LOT of side dishes. As of Sun. 4 of the guys found gold. I didnt get any pics of that so if you have more pics or gold pics feel free to post on this thread. I wanted to steal RiverStix little dog..... Tom H.
  3. 7 points
    Chris, I am not a dealer and have no dog in the race...my opinion is that there is not much difference in major manufacturer coils...I used coiltek and Nuggetfinder and I ended up using mostly Commander coils by Minelab- and they are usually cheaper. I am not telling what to do or not do, however... I suggest to anyone foolish enough to ask (you didn't) that they don't need more than two or three coils; small, stock and maybe a larger elliptical. Every time new coils come out the new users say they are the best ever, maybe and maybe not. What you need is to put your stock coil on and learn to use it and learn to find gold...new and more coils will not do that. You will do that. If my memory is correct you went through a bunch of detectors and gear and places and did not find much gold...the gold was there you just needed to spend more time learning. Practice, Practice and practice... best wishes fred
  4. 6 points
    I agree with BMc, that is a great bit of advice from Fred. The stock Minelab coil is an amazingly good coil. Don't make the mistake of thinking the latest coil will be the thing that finds you gold. That will not be what finds gold. It will be your ability to correctly use any coil, on the right ground that is holding gold, using a well-tuned and correctly set-up detector. Oh and patience really helps. Best of luck, it will happen.
  5. 6 points
    After many hours of searching I have located another iron meteorite. I won't give the specific location but I can tell you I was searching near Tucson, Az. The iron was found under about 24" of corn flakes and oyster shells. I was using an Illudium PU-36 Space Modulator with some blinking lights on top. The machine worked flawlessly even at that depth! Just look at that fusion crust! It is green indicating olivine is present! And the flow lines have created a texture that almost resembles a bamboo shoot. The enameled finish on the inside is smooth from the trip through the atmosphere and there is even a little stainless steel infuser that sits under the top. I have rubbed it on my toilet tank lid, waved a compass near it and stuck a refrigerator magnet to it. All tests indicate this is a type O-positive, Mesosideritic Chondruloid that came from Uranus at cosmic velocity. It was even found near a burned fence post. So you know this shite is the real deal. Similar specimens sell for around $25 and can bring as much as $40 with the two cast iron teacups that fall from the sky with them. So far I have found a half dozen of these meteorites in various strewn fields but no teacups yet. I keep thinking that I am not finding iron teacups because the machine just won't hit on an object that small. I am looking for a signal enhancer and a more sensitive coil for the PU-36 so I can complete the set. If I still can't find iron teacups with it I might have to break down and buy a new set of pulse induction dowsing rods and a coal fired pinpointer.
  6. 5 points
    I ended up with 7 nuggets. 5 were found Saturday afternoon in old hillside rake down hillside area. I raked about 15ft square and nuggets were popping out quite a bit. This hillside patch had more dig holes than I could count. The area was quite large and without a doubt has many more. Just because someone has detected an area doesn't mean they get them all. Had a great time detecting with Adam, thanks for all the laughs and I brake for bedrock shirts.
  7. 5 points
    Popac, Most people who find an unusual rock they think is a meteorite typically think it is from Mars or the Moon and worth tens of millions of dollars. There is always a fall story, usually embellished with seeing it fall from the sky with a blinding light right near them and going out and finding a new rock often burning hot or too hot to had touch at the bottom of a crater. It's wishful thinking. It is not what happens when a rock falls from space. Meteorites do not make holes, they don't burn, they don't light up from friction, and you won't see one shooting trail across the sky going all the way to the ground near you. Meteorites do not make holes. They land at the same speed as if you had dropped the same sized rock for a Cessna airplane. Each rock or meteorite would slow to it's terminal velocity based on air resistance. A bowling ball, or your rock, would slow to about 200 MPH. When it hit the ground it might break, or dent asphalt, but it would not make a crater. The terminal velocity of smaller stones is even lower. Galileo be damned. It would take a single stone the size of an eight passenger van to maintain enough velocity to make a crater as had occurred in Carancas, Peru, 27 Sep 2007. Meteorites come in at hypersonic 25,000 to 40,000 MPH velocities. At just below 60 miles high the air compacts at the front of the rock by ram pressure. The air itself becomes charged and fluorescences in brilliant light immediately expanding outward from the incoming meteor along its streak, which is actually what everyone sees when they see a meteor shoot across the sky. Think about it. The typical meteor is the size of a grain of rice. You can't see that 60 miles up. I don't care how bright it is. I repeat. What you are actually seeing is the instantaneously fluorescent atmosphere created by ram pressure along the meteor's path and not the actual rock. That same ram pressure heats up the outer surface and ablates (shatters) the meteor. Most are disintegrated and go off at about to 40 miles high. The very rare bollide that could produce a strewnfield of stones on the ground will go dark at about 35 to 25 miles high. All meteors will go dark after they drop below about 4500 MPH as they will no longer be enough pressure to produce light. Dark flight begins in the lower atmosphere as the meteorites continue to decelerate, but now producing sonic booms. They drop subsonic below 40 to 25 miles high. The trail of stones will become quite long with larger ones traveling farther that smaller fragments. When they reach terminal velocity for that sized stone they will lose nearly all of their forward momentum and drop nearly straight down being buffeted by the jet stream and atmospheric winds. The interior temperature of meteoriods in space is about -250 F. In the lower atmosphere the just-heated outer surface of incoming meteorites are blasted and chilled by the -60F of ever thickening air. Just fallen meteorites are usually warm to the touch, but not too hot to touch. Sometimes larger ones are icy cold as the interior re-chills the surface. The cannot start fires, in spite of the promulgated dubious Wisconsin-Chicago fire theory. (You should read my tutorial, "How to make a landing site for a meteorite." 31 Jan 31 2019.) Fresh meteorite falls are found on top of the ground by eyesight or by a magnet stick. Old falls containing larger stones or irons are buried much deeper and are often found by metal detectors. The reason that older fall meteorites are buried is normally not because they made a crater that deep, but that being much denser than the surrounding soil and boulders they sink slowly due to settling over the centuries. (See the depth of the Civil War bullets in my "Not Everything that Pings is a Meteorite" article 18 Dec 2018.) Cheers! billpeters
  8. 5 points
    Optimize your Equinox for peak "QUIET" performance. You old codgers already know this stuff but I am running into a lot of newbies that are a bit perplexed about the Equinox. This is for them. We have a lot of new detectorists as well as detectorists who have never used a Minelab machine before going through a learning curve with the Equinox. The most common problem seems to be that new Equinox owners feel the detector is noisy and they are not sure how to calm the machine down. Here are some tips: DETECTING TIPS: I know when you see detectors in pictures you always see the coil cable neatly wound around the lower and upper stem. The cable is usually secured with Velcro® wraps. Don't do it! Run the cable straight up the lower rod from the coil, securing it with Velcro® wraps. Once you get to the mid rod, then you can start to wrap the coil cable, and secure it with wraps until you plug it into the back of the machine. You want to be extremely careful about the wrap you put on the coil cable down by the coil. Make sure you leave enough slack so when you lay the machine down, with the coil flat on the ground, you have enough play in this coil cable that you are not stressing it. Why do you not want to wrap the coil cable around the lower rod? Have you ever seen one of those enormous electro-magnets used in a junk yard to lift cars? Well inside that big disk is nothing more than a bunch of wound wire. When electricity is ran through it, it creates a magnetic field. Well the same thing can happen with your coil cable when it is wound on the lower rod. You turn your detector on, it sends energy down the coil cable, and when it is wound around the lower rod, you have created a magnetic field right above your coil. This can desensitize your coil as your detector struggles to adjust itself to a magnetic field it can also cause erratic behavior. The other issue that can cause noisy operation is having the sensitivity too high and also not understanding all of the fundamental operations of the detector. So download and printout that manual. The manual is available for download on Minelab.com under Equinox. Cell phones are another big issue. Seriously! A major issue. Turn your phone off and get it as far away from your detector as possible. Put it in your backpack, up and away from the detector. Another issue is your Pin Pointer. If it is not a Minelab Pin Pointer, you can actually be getting interference from your non-Minelab Pinpointer EVEN WHEN IT IS OFF! Remember the wound wire, magnetic field problem mentioned above? Well most pinpointers have windings. These windings can actually pick up the energy from your detector and cause a magnetic field and drive your detector crazy. Especially if it is too close to the detector. Minelab actually identified this issue long ago. To that end they developed their DIF Technology: Minelab’s Detector Interference Free (DIF) technology significantly reduces interference with an operating metal detector, when the pinpointer is switched off, by disengaging the pinpointer coil’s magnetic field. UNDERSTANDING THE NOISE CANCEL FEATURE: Noise Cancel is a very important and critical feature of all Minelab Detectors. What Noise Cancel does is it searches for interference or lack there of. When it finds an interference free channel it locks onto it and uses it to provide you with a relatively noise free channel of operation. Nothing is perfect, and neither is NOISE CANCEL, but you can help Fine Tune the Noise Cancel feature. #1. Is there a known source of interference nearby? Another Detectorist. High Power Lines. Cell Towers or Antennas on the tops of mountains? If so, do this: Aim your coil at the suspected source of interference. Press the settings button, (It's the GEAR looking icon in the middle under the screen.) Keep pressing it until in the lower left corner of your screen a circle with a hash mark through an up and down depiction of noise appears. That is your NOISE CANCEL mode. Now hold your detector steady, while aiming the coil at the suspected interference source and push the CHECK MARK / "X" button on the right side of the control pad just to the right of the "+" plus button (You can also push the "+" button) This starts the Noise Cancel procedure. The detector cycles through channels looking for a clean channel. It will stop on what it thinks is a quiet channel. It will display a number from -9 to 9. These represent the channels. Is the detector still a little noisy? No worries. We are going to manually look for a clean channel. With your detector still aimed at the suspected source of interference. Push the "+" plus, or "-" button and you will go up or down the channel setting changing the channel. So let's say that your detector ends up during auto-noise cancel on channel 7. When you push the "-" MINUS button it will go to channel 6, then 5, then 4, etc. When you press the "+" PLUS button it will increase the channel. Often you will find during AUTO-NOISE cancel that the number ultimately displayed let's say -3, may not be perfectly quiet, but the channel right next to it is. So manually adjust it to -2 or -4 and see if you can find a quiet channel. #2. You don't know where the interference is coming from or there is relatively no interference. If so, do this: Put your coil on the ground. Now leaving the back of the coil on the ground, tip the front of the coil up at about a 45 degree angle, So from the side your coil it should look something like this __\--- That's a bit more than 45 degrees but you get the idea. Now slowly turn around 360 degrees, make a mental note of where the most interference is coming from. When you find that noisy spot, stop right there. Hold your coil still and go through the AUTO-Noise cancel outlined above, and the MANUAL NOISE Fine tuning using the PLUS or MINUS button I described above. Doing a Noise Cancel on the ground, is important. If you don't know where the interference is coming from, chances are good it is micro-wave interference or EMI. These sources bounce around. You want to cancel them at ground level because that is where your coil is going to be doing the detecting. After deciding on best channel, hit the DETECT button which is the BLACK button with the icon of a coil on the left side of your control button panel, to the left of the MINUS button. AFTER NOISE CANCEL: Now Balance your machine. Once again click on the GEAR ICON until you cycle through to the ICON of a coil with an up and down arrow. This should be to the right of the NOISE CANCEL icon that showed up in the lower left hand side of your screen. At first hold the PLUS "+" button down and pump the coil up and down against the ground about 6 inches. Listen to the sound. The coil will sound different either going away from the ground or going towards the ground. That is because your detector is not properly balanced. If you are getting a louder sound going away from the ground that means your detector is NEGATIVELY ground balanced. THIS IS VERY BAD! You will lose a lot of depth and it will be noisy. If you get a louder sound going away from the ground hold down the PLUS button, because the way to get the detector out of a NEGATIVE BALANCE is to ADD POSITIVE ground balance, this is done with the POSITIVE "+" button. Likewise, if you are getting a louder sound when the coil goes towards the ground you are out of balance on the POSITIVE side. The way to get the detector back in balance is to hold the negative button down "-" as this brings the POSITIVE balance down and gets the detector back in balance. You want to use the POSITIVE and NEGATIVE button while pumping the coil up and down until you are either getting no sound, or the sound is the same both going towards the ground and away from the ground with your coil. I know it may be a bit confusing, but let me try to simplify. LOUDER SOUND GOING AWAY FROM GROUND = NEGATIVE BALANCE - PRESS POSITIVE BUTTON To Bring the detector into balance. LOUDER SOUND GOING TOWARDS THE GROUND = POSITIVE BALANCE - PRESS NEGATIVE BUTTON to bring the detector into balance. SAME SOUND GOING TOWARDS OR AWAY FROM GROUND = PERFECTLY BALANCED DETECTOR. When the detector is balanced, push the TARGET / DETECT button in the middle at the bottom of the Button Control Panel. ADVANCED SECRET: Running your detector slightly out of balance on the POSITIVELY balanced side will give you extra depth, BUT it is quite noisy and prone to falsing. I hope these tips and tricks will help new comers to get their Equinox to purr like a kitten while detecting, and roar like a lion when it finds a target. Doc - Certified Minelab Gold Machine Trainer 26 years a Certified Dealer with Minelab. © 2019 G.M. "Doc" Lousignont Ph.D.
  9. 5 points
    Heck yeah, just run the 11 inch commander mono for a while until you get it figured out. Nice and lite and has pretty darn good depth on big gold and surprisingly sensitive to small gold. Then move on if you feel you need to. Good luck.
  10. 5 points
    I just finished "reconditioning" an ol Nuggetfinder 10" fiberglass disk. I came into. I'm actually excited about takin it out for the 1st time. An I'm goin to a place that has had detectors over it since the 1970's. I witnessed a 3.2 DWT. nugget come out of a 24 inch deep hole in a mountain wash a few years back with it. Coils an detectors are like "slot machines" its not the "seat" when ya see someone WINNING, its the ass that's in it .
  11. 5 points
    Izzme, the GB II can find itsy bits of gold as small as 1/20th grain using the 6" coil. The GMT, using the standard 10x6 coil, can easily find 1/10 grain flakes. When gold is $1,300.00 per ounce, we are talking about a 14 cent versus 27 cent target. But, the GMT has much more depth, handles mineralized ground much better, has automatic ground balance, has instantaneous ground balance, plus has iron ID and iron grunt (saves a vast amount of unnecessary digging), plus multiple speed self-adjusting threshold, and is much easier to use, especially for a novice. As for hunting on wet salt beaches, neither machine is well suited. Hope this helps' HH Jim
  12. 4 points
    Flashback Series: Tales From The Flat, Part 1Oh, the things we discover when we camp with someone for the first time . . .In the 1990’s, I used to chase the gold a long, long ways north and west of where I currently live, and the last section of the journey was a series of rough logging roads that was hard on vehicles and on nerves (if you’ve ever almost been killed by a logging truck, you know of what I speak).After our arduous journey, we selected a spot where some of the original gold rush miners from the 1870’s had camped. It was a nice level spot with a creek on one side and the river on the other, the river about 30 feet down on the left, the creek located in a gentle draw on the right.We went through the tiring process of unloading everything from the back of the truck, so that we could set up the outfitter’s wall tent. Once we’d put together a portion of the steel inner-frame, we hauled the white canvas up over the sidewall and roof supports. Next, I ran inside to lift up the remaining sidewall struts and poles, in order to set up, adjust, and stabilize the wall legs while my partner steadied the tent. After our canvas home was up, we covered the whole thing with a massive silver tarp as extra protection from the sudden downpours that frequently occur in those remote mountains. Then, we secured the tarp and the tent walls with ropes and stakes, and lastly, set up our mattresses, bedding, and the wood-burning stove my partner had manufactured himself (he used to supply the GPAA with stoves for their Alaska trips).We set up our base-camp on the flat treed area of older growth spruce, fur, white-barked birch, aspen, complimented by (along the banks of the bordering creek) thick stands of green-leafed willows and alders. Nestled amongst the trees, here and there, were several old log cabins, none of them inhabited, and an abandoned Hudson’s Bay store. However, all possessed great character. Likely each structure had many tales to tell, being located in such a rich, storied goldfield, one where the Argonauts had chased the gold for well over a hundred and twenty years. On a related note, the old road we had journeyed in on ran right through our camping flat, and was still in use by the locals to get to the upper lakes for fishing, and to get upstream to their mining claims.With the camp set up, I finally felt how truly hammered I was from lack of sleep, adrenaline drop, and road exhaustion, brought on by sixteen straight hours of night and day travel on terrible roads, plus near-death encounters with logging trucks! As the long summer night was beginning to wane, all I wanted to do was crawl into my sleeping bag and drift off to blissful sleep. That is what I wanted, but that is not what happened . . .A long, restful sleep was not to be that first night. Even though I fell asleep easily, I was soon jarred from my dreams to discover something shocking about my partner: his snoring alternated somewhere between the noise of a fully-revved chainsaw, to that of a fully engaged Jake-Brake (engine ******er brake) on a semi-trailer! I tried pushing on his air mattress to interrupt his screeching midnight symphony, but he only snorted, made puckering and slurping sounds, and then hurried on to compose whole new measures to his masterpiece.Mercifully, my brain came to my rescue: I remembered hearing somewhere that a sudden, loud noise could jar a person from their deep-sleep snoring, leaving them in a lighter state of sleep with no snoring. In desperation, I whistled as loud as I could. (I can perform a loud, ear-splitting whistle on command, call my horses in from half a mile) My partner shot bolt upright in his sleeping bag, wildly scanning every corner of the tent, completely unaware of what had torn him from his sleep. I lay there as quiet and motionless as death, eyes closed, the perfect picture of an unconscious tent mate. As nothing was amiss in the tent, he quickly settled down to drift off to a soundless sleep.For about fifteen minutes . . .After that short reprieve, he launched into a whole new musical composition whose noise surpassed his former cruel and unnatural level! I genuinely felt he would wake the long-dead miners in the historic cemetery two blocks away. So, I whistled again, with a renewed, desperate effort. Once more, he sat bolt upright, and again, I remained motionless and silent. This time, the snoring ceased for the night, and I slept like the dead in the cemetery two blocks distant.Upon waking the next morning, my partner was in a reflective mood. It took him a bit of time to come out and state what was perplexing him so deeply. After fidgeting a bit, he said, “Do you realize you whistle in your sleep? You woke me up last night, and I just couldn’t get back to sleep!”Truth is indeed stranger than fiction.All the best,Lanny
  13. 4 points
    Could be the best "advice" you could get on this or any other forum. You can only gear up so much, until you risk becoming psychologically dependent on the next new thing syndrome. In general, what I have found a need for in a detector/coil package is the potential for reasonable depth capability, and a good ability to handle mineralization. That's the basics (at least for me) A PI, a VLF, and about 3 coils, (as Fred suggested) A lot of other factors may come into play depending upon the individual, but Fred's take on the subject is spot on. Keep in mind that successful gold hunters in the past learned to use the gear they had. Many, only had one detector and one coil but they usually invested considerable time in learning how and where to waive the coil they had.
  14. 4 points
    Nice piece. I can still remember when I first started, I had to use a "tweezer" to pick em up from the pan after drywashing ! Anything you can handle with yer fingers is a "TROPHY" ! Hapy Huntn.
  15. 3 points
    for all your negative posts. now have friends in Bosnia, Croatia, Kenya and London. again thanks, bob
  16. 3 points
    Hey I found gold nuggets upwards of 3 ounces each on the edge of a new subdivision in a friends back yard in people's valley, Az. It happens. but it wasn't in a pre-dug hole. (Model creek placers) Sorry about the focus and flash it was my first selfie. AzNuggetBob
  17. 3 points
    You are very welcome bob! Even though they were not meteorites there was still value in the experience. That is what is so great about this hobby! Friends are always more valuable than meteorites anyway. They are infinitely more valuable than a hunk of worthless rock. Cheers bob!
  18. 3 points
    Fredmason, Actually, I write these off in a flash because I feel passionate about it. My exception is the oft repeated standard explanation of meteorite characteristics for the newbies. billpeters
  19. 3 points
    Flight Characteristics of Meteorites, Most people who find an unusual rock they think is a meteorite typically think it is from Mars or the Moon and worth tens of millions of dollars. There is always a fall story, usually embellished with seeing it fall from the sky with a blinding light right near them and going out and finding a new rock often burning hot or too hot to touch at the bottom of a crater. It's wishful thinking. It is not what happens when a rock falls from space. Meteorites do not make holes, they don't burn, they don't light up from friction, and you won't see one shooting trail across the sky going all the way to the ground near you. Meteorites do not make holes. They land at the same speed as if you had dropped the same sized rock for a Cessna airplane. Each rock or meteorite would slow to it's terminal velocity based on air resistance. A bowling ball, or your rock, would slow to about 200 MPH. When it hit the ground it might break, or dent asphalt, but it would not make a crater. The terminal velocity of smaller stones is even lower. Galileo be damned. It would take a single stone the size of an eight passenger van to maintain enough velocity to make a crater as had occurred in Carancas, Peru, 27 Sep 2007. Meteorites come in at hypersonic 25,000 to 40,000 MPH velocities. At just below 60 miles high the air compacts at the front of the rock by ram pressure. The air itself becomes charged and fluorescences in brilliant light immediately expanding outward from the incoming meteor along its streak, which is actually what everyone sees when they see a meteor shoot across the sky. Think about it. The typical meteor is the size of a grain of rice. You can't see that 60 miles up. I don't care how bright it is. I repeat. What you are actually seeing is the instantaneously fluorescent atmosphere created by ram pressure along the meteor's path and not the actual rock. That same ram pressure heats up the outer surface and ablates (shatters) the meteor. Most are disintegrated and go off at about to 40 miles high. The very rare bollide that could produce a strewnfield of stones on the ground will go dark at about 35 to 25 miles high. All meteors will go dark after they drop below about 4500 MPH as they will no longer be enough pressure to produce light. Dark flight begins in the lower atmosphere as the meteorites continue to decelerate, but now producing sonic booms. They drop subsonic below 40 to 25 miles high. The trail of stones will become quite long with larger ones traveling farther that smaller fragments. When they reach terminal velocity for that sized stone they will lose nearly all of their forward momentum and drop nearly straight down being buffeted by the jet stream and atmospheric winds. The interior temperature of meteoriods in space is about -250 F. In the lower atmosphere the just-heated outer surface of incoming meteorites are blasted and chilled by the -60F of ever thickening air. Just fallen meteorites are usually warm to the touch, but not too hot to touch. Sometimes larger ones are icy cold as the interior re-chills the surface. The cannot start fires, in spite of the promulgated dubious Wisconsin-Chicago fire theory. (You should read my tutorial, "How to make a landing site for a meteorite." 31 Jan 31 2019.) Fresh meteorite falls are found on top of the ground by eyesight or by a magnet stick. Old falls containing larger stones or irons are buried much deeper and are often found by metal detectors. The reason that older fall meteorites are buried is normally not because they made a crater that deep, but that being much denser than the surrounding soil and boulders they sink slowly due to settling over the centuries. (See the depth of the Civil War bullets in my "Not Everything that Pings is a Meteorite" article 18 Dec 2018.) Cheers! billpeters
  20. 3 points
    Thank you very much Skip! and Fred and I got a real good laugh Don. Made my day. Fred, I'm still around just been taking a break but I'm winding down to retirement and then you better all watch out Cheers Johnno
  21. 3 points
    https://www.syfy.com/syfywire/60-years-ago-today-day-meteorite-hit-ann-hodges I saw a photo of the ceiling after it came through the roof but never one of her bruise. That's a pretty bad one.
  22. 3 points
    Yo All...Late Tues. afternoon I heard some unusual sounds coming from our backyard water hole ... We've had these critters often but never this many Javalinas at once! The babies born a few months ago are growing fast....Cheers, Unc
  23. 3 points
    I meant it as comic humor. I just can't imagine someone actually trying to shoo them away. Being from the big city, any wild animal with tusks is to be avoided at all costs. Perhaps I've been watching too many horror movies.😀
  24. 3 points
    Hi Fred, your memory is absolutely correct. I went through a lot of stuff that didn't help me one bit... because I didn't know how and where to use them. After reading everybody's replies to my recent questions I have decided that, like you mentioned, I am only going to incorporate 3 coils (technically 4 because of the 2 stock coils). Rob was awesome enough to have a NuggetFinder Sadie coil drop-shipped to me which I received today. So, in addition to those 3 coils, I want to EVENTUALLY add a large elliptical coil to the arsenal. But until that happens I will spend as much time as I can using and learning my machine.
  25. 3 points
    Got me a new to me boat...going to be a good fishing boat.... 17 ft ti hull with 175hp I/O Just got it out of the shop, had it tuned up...now to get it on the lake.
  26. 3 points
    I had a buddy that used to winter in Arizona, by Stanton. He and his friend drove on a trail every day to get to where they detected for nuggets. They drove back and forth on that trail dozens of times. I went to that spot on the trail with my buddy, because he was excited to show me the place. It looked a lot like your spot, and now I'll tell you the rest of the story . . . Well, one day, they stopped and pulled out the detectors to give it a try. They got a signal on the trail, yes, right on the trail! By the time they were done with the trail, and the margins along the trail in an area about the size of a couple of pickup truck boxes, they had over a pound of gold, a pound (after specific gravity tests on the specimens, the nuggets were easy to weigh! I saw the gold, hefted it, saw the solid nuggets and the gorgeous specimens, and I was with my buddy when he found another gorgeous specimen in ground that looks remarkably like yours, along the margin of that same trail, within twenty feet of the original finds. If you're in gold country, which you've already researched and found out your spot is, adopt the attitude that "you'll never know until you go". Let us know how you do, when you go, and all the best, Lanny
  27. 3 points
    Where's your sense of humor?
  28. 3 points
    I bought the 24k so my wife could hsve sa simple machine. This weekend I tried it out and found 2 Native Arizona copper nuggets.
  29. 3 points
    I have owned both the GMT and the GB2 for about 20 years...The GB2 is excellent for fly poop nugs and bigger...The GMT is good for dinks, and, once you've put enough hours on it, you'll find it will go deeper than the GB2 and has the added advantage of of a visual ID...Once you figure that out, it also works great on coins in the park and all goodies on the beach...The GB2 has a major learning curve and you have to train your ear but when you do, you can use sound to tell difference between birdshot and golden dinks...Both of mine are well worn and I usually carry 3 or 4 detectors...My ML GPX 4500, SD 2100, ML Gold Monster, GB2 and GMT...This gives me wide latitude according conditions... My 2 cents...Cheers, Unc
  30. 3 points
    Thanks Homey! I did come from a military family, but the closest I got was ROTC in high school. I wish I had stuck with it sometimes. My grandfather, Clyde Voak, was an ace mechanic. He was also a Flying Sergeant during WWII. He flew a C-47 transporting wounded soldiers back to England from the European front. Pop was always my hero, and still is today, even though he has been gone for many years. He taught me how to work on stuff...and make do with what you had.
  31. 3 points
    Thanks guys. I will just go ahead keep the Eureka. I paid $240 for the coil and the battery pack, so selling it for any less would be basically giving the detector away for free with the new items. Guess it never hurts to have too much than not enough. 😊😁👍
  32. 3 points
    Some time spent on Ebay will definitely give an idea what they are selling for. Ebay and Craigslist are my go-to spots to get an idea of what something is worth. Free education.
  33. 3 points
    Warning, I have gone out these past two weekends. The desert is covered in flowers and other vegetation due to the heavy, continuous rains and snows. This is NOT a good time to hunt for meteorites. billpeters
  34. 3 points
    Shoot, im all packed, just have to get the food together.....cant wait! Tom H.
  35. 3 points
    Absolutely! And there are many examples of that principle all over the place! AZ and NV to be sure. In certain areas, much of the ground that turns up nuggets, happens to be on the way to "better looking" ground. And don't forget the 4X4 trail goin' in! Honest to God, in gold country . . . even if you're takin' a P, You've still got one hand free! Statistically speaking of course.
  36. 3 points
    You kids better start charging your detector batteries
  37. 2 points
  38. 2 points
    Those are rare golden meteorites Bob! They had to have fallen from the sky to get in that guy's back yard like that. And since they are non-magnetic that would indicate they are Martian meteorites. Because Martian meteorites are non-magnetic! Golden Martian Meteorites dude! They must be worth many fortunes!
  39. 2 points
    Great story Lanny It brings back a lot of memories for me too. Dodging logging trucks in NorCal driving a Baja bug on icy roads and snoring hunting partners. The secret is, you just have to out snore them. AzNuggetBob
  40. 2 points
    I want to give a big thank you to River Stix. The contribution to the outing that you gave was tremendous. I haven't had so many belly laughs at one time in quite a while. Sort of made my sore back feel a lot better (also the Crown Royal). Well done my friend. Old Tom
  41. 2 points
    BillPeters, do you have these pre-written, or do you snap these off in a flash... excellent explanation! nice resume too fred
  42. 2 points
    Your doing stuff here I never would have even imagined ever possible Dave. No Clues Aluminum could be worked like this. Yep, all the stuff like the oil passages and what not can be addressed here and now. All that little extra details Could be the difference between Staying in the air or forcing down some place in the rocks. By Dang your going to know every nook and cranny on this engine for sure. Cool Beans Sir!
  43. 2 points
    Very nice and unusual find. Congrats. I might have passed it up thinking it was a 2 by 4.
  44. 2 points
    We will arrive Friday Morning... See ya all there
  45. 2 points
    Missy, I have many relatives who live in Florida and I know for a fact that Florida has very few if any true rocks throughout most of Florida, with the exception of maybe the panhandle....BUT what the state does have is lots of ancient coral and agatized coral, the state rock/stone is agatized coral, in most states if you dig deep enough you will eventaully hit bedrock, not so in Florida..but if you dig deep enough you will hit coral most everywhere, the majority of the state sit on this ancient coral and it is used or once was as building materials just as rock and stone is many other places. I think this is what you have, a BIG chunk of coral, as far as the "bones", I guess that when the coral was alive and growing it could have grown over and or on a dead animal skeleton of some type.
  46. 2 points
    Not bones unless someone was engulfed in that boulder millions of years ago. Natural erosion process within the boulder.
  47. 2 points
    Too true, keep that detector on from the car and back...you never know
  48. 2 points
    So adam,...is that equal to a 2/5'er ???
  49. 2 points
    The main advantage of the mods as I see them, are the increased adjustability of the detector. If you already know the machine, you can tweak, and get a little more out of it in the right conditions. Coil size, gold size, depth, etc.... The stock 4500 is going to be just fine un-modded. Once you've found some gold with it, then you can make a better decision about spending another $1800 on your detector. The main thing is getting out there. If you can't find anything with a stock detector, the mods probably won't help either. Luke
  50. 2 points
    Chris, I thought I might win the "gung ho" award for the month, but you passed me for the lead with the mod questions.. lol I only joke about it based on my first few weeks with my new 4500, and my personal ability to learn new machines. I pick things up pretty quick, and the stock 4500 has more than enough things to fiddle with, to keep me busy (and scratching my head), for another few hundred hours, at least. If you ran in to me in the field right now, there's a good chance you might find me sitting on a rock. Sandwich in one hand, 4500 manual in the other. I get it, though. I found one tiny specimen in January, with my Equinox. Now I have a 4500, and a Gold Monster. The funniest part of it all? Based on the shallow depth of the one little piece I found, I am pretty sure my Garrett Ace 250 would have found it just fine... Glad to see I'm not alone in my newest addiction! Regards, Kyle
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