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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/20/2021 in Posts

  1. Hit some really hammered patches at several locations, and the GPX 6000 was able to sniff out almost 6 grams for me! No regrets trading in my 7000 for this machine.⛏👍😊
    12 points
  2. All were shallow and thunk outside the box today and worked some areas that didn’t look ideal But gold don’t care if it looks good to us or not!
    12 points
  3. Nice and cool for detecting
    9 points
  4. I didn't have anyone to teach me either, but I read and learned, practiced out in the field and gradually my skills increased. Prospecting is a skill like being a plumber or an electrician. Owning a pipe wrench does not make one a plumber. The journeyman plumber is what he is because he knows plumbing. He has learned a skill. His knowledge makes him a plumber. He worked to gain that knowledge. Owning a metal detector does not make one a skilled prospector, but learning and experience do. Clubs are made of folks like you and me. A new guy comes in and it takes a while to get to know folks. Very rarely will someone rush over to greet you. You have to go out of your way to be friendly and become a part of the group. Volunteer to help with anything you can to get to know people - clubs are always looking for volunteers. Relationships take time to establish. One or two meetings aint going to cut it. Make some friends by reaching out yourself repeatedly. Lots of guys give up quickly when they learn its work learn how to become a successful prospector. Hang in there, have patience and persevere. You will get out of it what you put into it.
    9 points
  5. Hammered area after hammered area at the LSD the 6000 keeps them coming
    8 points
  6. Hello all, I hope everyone is doing good. Just wanted to share that my youngest son was able to get his cow elk tag filled yesterday. Its his first big game animal! He wasn't lucky enough to draw a youth deer tag this year "WIERD" but i was able to get him a first come first served cow elk tag. He was extremely excited when i showed him we won the tag. Shot her at 297 yards with his 7mm-08. It was a blast. Season opened on Friday and he ended up getting her yesterday afternoon. We love elk meat, nothing better!! Take care everyone!
    7 points
  7. No matter "who" takes the time to possibly teach you a thing or 3, your already headed down the right trail from what you've said. You have the desire, and perserverance to take you to the next level. Remember there is NO substitute for boots on the ground ! Keep at it and most important is you must "believe" you can do it and you must believe there's a nugget out there in the dirt with your name on it. 🤠 Happy Huntn.
    6 points
  8. 28.1 grams and many or most of them are in the videos I share, but some are not as it is nice to get out without the camera and all the hub bub
    5 points
  9. Oldest human footprints in North America found in New Mexico Fossilised footprints dating 23,000 years push back the known date the continent was colonized by thousands of years. “Many tracks appear to be those of teenagers and children; large adult footprints are less frequent,” write the authors of the study published in the American journal Science. https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/9/24/oldest-human-footprints-in-north-america-found-in-new-mexico
    5 points
  10. Hey Brown, As you may already know, a few of the guys in the WPA club has found some good gold on the club claims, and in the general vicinity. I was a club member and last up there several months ago for a few days. I was hunting with a guy who found a half oz specie about 4" deep on the top of a 10-15 ft tall pile at a dredge tailing pile in Big Atlantic Gulch. If you have the club claim maps it's the Bridge Buster claim. There's a lot of tailing piles from that point North that look unworked and somewhat difficult to access due to thick brush and beaver ponds, but I'm told that they have been relatively untouched since the time of the war order shut down in 1942. Might be worth checking out. Here's a pic of a nugget I found at 6" in a smaller tailing pile a few years back in Crow's Nest Gulch (GPS Coords: 42.5032901-108.6356649) When I was there more recently, a few tailings piles still hadn't been worked or not raked down at least. You might want to take a look and give it a try. Also attached is a pic of some glacer nuggets taken off of a ranch property East of Crows Nest in a non-mineralized area. Mac -
    5 points
  11. I learned prospecting by finding placer with a rocker box and drywasher. Then I applied what I had learned to detecting. It's going to be tough learning placer with a detector because so much of it is too small or too deep to hear. Lots of guys get on a good spot with a detector and find some gold. But sooner or later they need to find a new spot. And unless they know how to find one by sampling and observation they are right back where they started. Research gold producing areas and visit them. Spend some time working placer gold with a drywasher and learning the basics. It will make your detecting a LOT more successful. A club is a great idea. You will outgrow the club fast but it is a stepping stone. And you will meet others that will share their "secrets" with you. Very few have any "secrets" to share even if they believe they do. It takes a couple years to learn the basics. It is a big field and encompasses a lot of knowledge across many disciplines. But it will come in time. Start by getting on gold with a drywasher. Find a spot where the gold is a bit coarser than the average area and then hit it with a detector. Don't be afraid to use a rake and a shovel to prepare your area for detecting. Get down on your hands and knees over an area you know has detectable gold and make it work. Then once you find a couple pieces stand up and go walking. Slowly. You will gain proficiency and speed as long as you are over detectable gold. If you aren't over detectable gold you will find squat. And that is most people's biggest problem. There are lots of good prospectors here that will help. But you have to have some experience to be able to ask the right questions. It just takes time. Gold is not easy to find for most of us. It took me many days to find my first nugget with a detector. Even after many years of placer gold experience. Even though I KNEW I was over detectable gold. So keep at it and be patient. You will prevail. It took me a year and over 1000 hours in the field to find my first meteorite with a detector. And I had been detecting for 20 years. So perseverance is key to this game. And you learn much more from failure than success because you have so much more of it at first. Hope that helps! And don't be afraid to ask here. This is a great forum and many guys here have plenty of knowledge to share. Bob
    5 points
  12. I never thought I’d buy paydirt before but recently got a truckload, and it’s been fun and great exercise processing itI I’ve been drywashing the DG pile we got delivered for a backyard patio and landscaping project, and my wife is mad about it because she says it wasn’t supposed to be my playsand and she thought I’d be finished with the landscaping project by now. I found a few specs of flour gold in the half-yard or so I already processed, and have just another three to go! If anyone wants to come over and have some gold drywashing fun, just let me know!
    3 points
  13. I should have posted on this subject years ago. I sold tons (literally) of paydirt, mostly from Rich Hill, AZ and the Cargo Muchacho Mountains in CA. (near the American Girl Mine) Everything I sold was authentic gold bearing material from known goldfields. I started with drywasher concentrates from Rich Hill and soon learned that people don't like "paydirt" unless they find gold so I had to start salting every bag I shipped out. Anyone with any mining experience knows that an ounce of gold per ton is incredibly rich. In the real world, you can go through 500 pounds and get nothing. All of the paydirt I sold had gold and it had much more than an ounce per ton. The mailman doesn't come out to the goldfields so once you dig the dirt, you have to bring it back to your camp, weigh it, bag it up, salt it, package it, then drive it to the post office in town and pay the postage. Rich Hill to Congress, AZ is about 10 miles over one of the roughest roads in the country. The Cargo Muchacho Mountains are about 15 miles from the post office in Winterhaven, CA and much of the trip is over Sidewinder Road which is usually a terrible washboard. Most of my customers were happy. Others were unhappy that they didn't get $50 worth of gold out of a $50 bag. Others were either incompetent and couldn't find the gold I added or they were outright liars. Very few had any idea what it took to get that bag of paydirt from to goldfields to their mailbox and even fewer had any idea how much that little pile of color was worth. If I was going to buy "paydirt", I sure wouldn't buy it from someone who is 1,000 miles from any known gold deposits. It probably makes more sense to buy a gram of gold on ebay, dump it into a pan of your own dirt and see how much you can pan out. * Be sure to pan over a tub so you don't lose any gold that you wash out of the pan.
    3 points
  14. You are so right! Fishing and Hunting teaches patience for sure, and technique. Prospecting is a lot like that. Trying to figure out where to go, what to look for. The "signs" that you learn to read, gradually reduces that feeling of being overwhelmed. I went out nugget hunting with a newby guy not too long ago and after we got to a good spot with geological indicators all over the place he looked around and said, "Gee it's all so random" We were standing in in the middle of a contact zone with small pieces of gnarly rusty quartz laying on top of a red soil layer 20 feet across, and a few feet away in the side of a wash was a foot wide vertical igneous slab of intrusive rock with triangular shaped rock pieces scattered around the base. I finally spotted the claim marker high up on the side of the ridge so we didn't detect but it was a good place to discuss gold indicators and to stress the importance of being able to read "sign" As a kid, while out with my Dad deer hunting, he would stress looking for fresh sign; mostly tracks and pellets. He would say, "If the signs are there, the deer are there, so don't just look for a deer, closely observe and study each bush and hiding place for an ear twitch or a slight color pattern that may faintly stand out, and other subtleties which can give away a deer's hiding place. He also insisted, If the signs are there and you are not seeing any, you're missing them. Believe in the fact that they are there, SLOW DOWN AND HUNT" Once you start picking up the "signs" you should notice a big boost in confidence. Then it becomes much less overwhelming, and more of a matter of finding the hiding places.
    3 points
  15. Many rocks have what appears to be metallic flakes but in reality are just glistening minerals. The pictures you posted are 100 percent not meteorites.
    3 points
  16. The above statement by BMc is sound advice to get you that first nugget. Been there and done that same thing. I had passed a pile high on a hill multiple times, always just looking at it. After another day of the skunk I decided to go up to it and try my luck. It was right off a well traveled road so I thought somebody had hit it. Passing several other piles with dig holes and raked down areas, I thought somebody must have hit my pile of interest. I got to the pile and low-n-behold..... The angle of repose was still in tact... no dig holes.... no raked down areas. After several bullets I found my first piece of detected gold... a solid quarter oz. We...(wife and son) worked that pile all summer long from top to bottom. We picked up just a tad over 2oz's. Just because a pile is in an obvious spot... don't assume it's been checked. Best of luck.... Stay Safe Crappy photo!!
    3 points
  17. You came to the right forum to learn brownb. If you want to find detectable gold with a detector, my advice is go where it has been found before. You don't say where you are but joining a club with active producing claims will take months or even years off the time it takes you to detect a nugget. I found my first gold on club claims at Rich Hill near Stanton, AZ with a Gold Bug 2. First I found a tiny specimen, then BINGO, a solid 57 gram whopper. Detecting nuggets gets harder every time someone digs one up but you will find some if you keep at it. Think positive and listen to your detector. Dig everything that beeps.
    3 points
  18. Looks kinda like an oversized hopper and a classification screen.
    2 points
  19. Yes sir, very understandable and hopefully it didn't sound like complaining. Thankful for people like yourself and Bill among others who create the content they do. And currently enjoying your book. Reading the article and how it described a rookie hitting the ground running almost described my situation to a tee. Was mostly curious to see how many people shared similar stories. And maybe how someone helped them or how they helped someone along the way.
    2 points
  20. Did a little beeping yesterday, got skunked, unless we are counting trash, in which case I scored big 😉
    2 points
  21. Saw working sand on a Gold Fever show, and got some from Home Depot for a run. I was hoping the dirt I got was from the local San Domingo Wash Gravel pit, which I doubt, and didn’t find anything. THe dirt I got could have been from any pit anywhere that went in the bag. Silly as it sounds, I think that would be a Funtime. At work, I offer up “Anyone with a strong back is welcome to come out and dig holes with me and can keep any golf they find. Anyone without a strong back is still welcome.” I’ve never had a taker.
    2 points
  22. Okay I will play along. I just subscribed and of course gave props to Bill. He is why I am here, and also why I purchased my Nox 800. D
    2 points
  23. Wouldn't mind going down to Arizona or Nevada one of these days. Vacation time is limited so I am just a weekend warrior for now. South Pass being only 2 hours away makes it easy for day trips though. The origins of gold was one of the questions I started looking for answers pretty quickly. Been reading anything I can find on reliable sources and looking at usgs maps trying to understand how it all comes together. I find spots I want to explore on a map. But when I stand there in person it all seems overwhelming. And feel like searching for that proverbial needle in a haystack. Feel like I am not too far off on approaching it like fishing or hunting. My dad always said they call it fishing not catching. Figure it is somewhat similar with prospecting. I got used to getting skunked fishing before I got decent at catching.
    2 points
  24. Wow. An amateur treasure hunter wielding a metal detector has discovered a stunning gold hoard buried by an Iron Age chieftain in the sixth century in what is now Denmark. The stash includes lavish jewelry, Roman coins and an ornament that may depict a Norse god. The treasure hunter, Ole Ginnerup Schytz, uncovered the Iron Age hoard on land owned by one of his former classmates in the town of Vindelev, earning the stash the name "Vindelev hoard." Within a few hours of surveying the area with his newly acquired metal detector, Schytz heard the telltale beeping of possible treasure. It turned out to be one of the "largest, richest and most beautiful gold treasures in Danish history," representatives of Vejle Museums said in a statement released Sept. 9. The 1,500-year-old hoard contains nearly 2.2 pounds (1 kilogram) of gold, including large, saucer-sized medallions known as bracteates. An excavation of the site by archaeologists from Vejle Museums, in collaboration with the National Museum of Denmark, revealed that the gold valuables were buried in a longhouse, which may indicate that Vindelev was a powerful village during the Iron Age. https://www.livescience.com/gold-hoard-sixth-century-denmark
    2 points
  25. Hi Slim, have not been to the Dale in a few years. Moved out of Comiefornia to North of Prescott AZ. About 10 miles East of Chino Valley about a month ago. High desert Pinion and Juniper country, Deer, Elk, Antelope and Javelina about 4700 ft. love it here. finally sold the vineyard and I am retired now. Have a lot of gold areas within a hours drive from our ranch. Researching open ground in and around the gold districts right now. One more trailer load from Paso Robles and we are done. Working on fencing the ranch and doing home and barn repair. soon I will be a full time prospector. Thanks Bob
    2 points
  26. If it's a flashlight it should be a LW 365nm for best results. But the 254nm shortwave is better but more expensive.
    2 points
  27. IMHO it is best to use a drywasher to locate a detecting area and not the other way around. There are plenty of areas you can find gold. Very few with gold big enough to detect. So find gold first with a drywasher. Then when you know you are over gold whip out the detector. Otherwise you can stumble around for weeks over ground that will never produce anything and still not know if there is gold there. Around my area there is a lot of fine gold. You can get a few specks almost anywhere. But there are only 3 areas where you could find it with a detector. And only a couple spots in each area that are worth wasting time on. You will get a BUNCH more gold with a drywasher than a detector in most placer areas. Detectors are great if you live near big gold or travel to a nugget producing area. But they are nothing but a recipe for frustration in most places.
    2 points
  28. I know your pain well Bob. I acquired a 8mm Mauser when I was around sixteen years old. That was right after WWII around 1949 and this gun was 'purchased' in Germany by a friends father that needed money at the time. I spent my savings of $150.00 to get it and have hunted with it ever since. Many a tumble I have taken with it and the only thing injured was me. That rifle was manufactured long before Hitler came to power. Engraved, hex barrel at breach tapered to a round at muzzle. Ribbing on top of barrel with the finest open sights that I have ever used. Double trigger with all matched parts. I still have my first twelve gage shotgun that I broke the stock in half from a fall down a steep gully. It is a keystone and it sure did get me a lot of ducks, rabbits, and pheasants away back. Old Tom
    2 points
  29. The Howa is a great rifle. It is mighty expensive by comparison but they are fine quality stuff. And the magazine holds more rounds too. The Tikka with the wood stocks are just sweet but their composite stocks are not as good as the Hogue for sure. They are incredibly light and kick like a mule with the wood stock. I love the Hogue stocks. I have them on both my hunting rifle and the varmint gun. They are just the cats meow. They are kinda springy and take all the recoil out of the big 30-06. Im not fond of the feel of a composite stock. And they are noisy. But cover them in that grippy rubber overmold and put that cool bedding rail in there and you just can't beat them. I like the Hogue kit for the AR-15 too. I have the Hogue grip and forend on one and it is perfect. They are indestructible and really functional. Betcha they make one for the Ruger American.
    2 points
  30. We also love the .243. I reload 100 grain soft points for it and talk about dropping a hammer on the deer! We shot this elk with 139 grain factory ammo and it just dropped her. They weren't the most consistent on accuracy, with a crazy flyer once in a while, but not too bad. Plus, the barrel on that gun heated up really fast, so that also played a huge role in getting it sighted in. My wife wants one now too lol!! I use to love my 7mm but dang, what a kicking mule!!
    2 points
  31. Welo Opal with dendrite
    2 points
  32. If you're going to be poking around ore dumps, you should consider getting a SW lamp or LW flashlight to check for fluorescence. No doubt there's some very nice looking specimens to be found. I've found crushing ore samples to be a complete waste of time. I never found anything of value in a single ore sample that didn't set off a metal detector. You could probably get more for the ore sample as is than the contents of the sample itself.
    2 points
  33. The photos resolution is not enough to show fine details. I will go out on a limb, and say that maybe the whole sample is made of broken fragments of former sea creatures "shells" cemented together. This is called "fossil hash". Sample may be a limestone (type of rock).
    1 point
  34. Tom, you're right all of the baby monitors I looked most don't mention if they have volume control or not....but I would think most of them do.....I did however find this one that does say it has volume control and you can clearly see the volume control on both the receiver and the monitor, and the price is one of the least of most of the monitors I looked at so if isn't loud enough you're not out a lot of money but I'm sure any of them can returned if you're not happy with it. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007NG5UF4?tag=lm-best-baby-monitors-20&geniuslink=true
    1 point
  35. A Howa in .223 is a beautiful thing. There is not a more accurate varmint gun on the market for sure. And that particular caliber in those first Howa rifles were the very best. When we bought the Tikka we were actually looking for a Savage. We were having trouble finding one in 30-06. The Tikka was just being imported and they chambered lots of them in '06. My son liked the wood stock. We hunt some rough country and I told him to get the composite stock because he was going to beat it up. He wanted wood. When it came in we took it out of the box and it was gorgeous. The bluing, the stock, everything was flawless and polished. It is a real work of art. He has hunted with that rifle for several years now and there is not a scratch on it. He will tumble down a bad slope head over heels. He will slide through rocks and cactus and blood will be dripping off his elbows but that rifle hasn't touched a rock yet. If it did we would both weep tears of sorrow. It is a really purdy rifle.
    1 point
  36. Your right Bob, he will not part with it lol. I don't own any Tikka rifles. I have shot one in .243 but didn't buy it at the time. I do love the Howa rifles though. A little heavy with the Hogue stock and semi bull barrel, but they definitely shoot well. Same there, for the price you just can't beat what you get.
    1 point
  37. It's a great hunting gun. A buddy of mine bought a Ruger a couple seasons ago and loves it. I bet your son wouldn't part with it now for anything. Ifn I was going to buy a new rifle in that caliber it would be this one. Only with a blued steel barrel. https://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/tikka-t3x-lite-bolt-7mm-08-remington-bolt-action-rifle The Tikka is IMHO the best all around value for a new hunting rifle. There are a bunch of guns that are a lot more expensive but none that are better made and very few that will shoot as good. ...so there is my rant on the Tikka rifles. I bought one for my toddler a few years back and I have been really impressed. It's chambered in 30-06 with a wood stock and will shoot as good as anything I have leaning in the closet. I really, REALLY want to buy one for me too.
    1 point
  38. Ruby and Sapphire are the deep red, and deep blue colored varieties of corundum. Just in case anyone wanted to know.
    1 point
  39. Hello Bob, I have not started reloading for it yet, just because it is a new caliber in our house. After talking to a bunch of my friends that shoot them for hunting and long range shooting, we decided to buy him one for Christmas last year. I didn't want to stock up on reloading supplies for it until we gave it a good solid run. Well reloading supplies will be ordered haha. I love it, he loves it and it has a push instead of a hard jolt or a kick. And yes its in the middle of a .243 and a .308. But the .260 falls in there too, its just not as popular. I do have 1 friend that uses .308 casings and necks them down. Just has to trim the neck down after sizing. Its a fun round for sure!
    1 point
  40. There is a long history of volcanism associated with that hotspot. And from what I understand about how gold moves to the surface it makes sense. Not sure I would attribute the gold in Nevada to the Yellowstone hotspot though. At least not all of it. Seems like volcanic activity isn't always a good indicator for gold. And more a matter if gold was present or not during that activity. There is an ancient volcano 20 miles from me with no evidence of associated gold. But industrial grade diamonds and other gemstones.
    1 point
  41. According to the author, Luis Vega, it's time to think outside of the box when searching for gold and other mineral deposits. I always like the anticipation and the hunt, not so much returning home at the end of field season. Except for this year. The record-setting heat and the forest fire smoke made prospecting downright unhealthy. This year, the best part was returning home to an air-conditioned office to begin research for next year’s field season. It’s the anticipation of the next strike that keeps a prospector feeling young. Where to start looking for an undiscovered mineral deposit? I think it’s safe to say that every inch of the lower 48 has been prospected and every mineral occurrence that outcrops has been tested. So where do I go from here? Luckily, geologic information is constantly evolving and new theories and concepts are being developed. These new theories can indicate where a mineral occurrence could be hiding. Its possibility must be accepted on faith and conviction in the theory, with the ultimate hurdle being the finding of investors willing to risk their money on a theory. Sometimes a geologist has to be a good salesman. A prime example is the theory that the Yellowstone hotspot supplied the heat and gold for the “Carlin-type” gold deposits found in northern Nevada. Nevada produces over 8 million ounces of gold per year, mostly from Carlin-type deposits. Those looking for new deposits of this type would love to know what controls where these deposits were formed. Enter the new theories on the Yellowstone hotspot. Everyone should visit Yellowstone with its geysers, bubbling hot springs and fumaroles. For a geologist, the bison, wolves and grizzlies are an added bonus but it’s the geologic phenomena that’s the main attraction. The source of the heat is a deep-seated molten rock originating in the mantle called a hotspot. The molten material rises through the earth’s crust until it reaches the surface and super-heats water causing a caldera explosion. The Hawaiian Islands sit on top of a hotspot. The hotspot doesn’t move but as the oceanic plate moves, the hotspot forms volcanic islands in a line that marks the movement of the oceanic plate. But how can the Yellowstone hotspot be responsible for gold deposits in Nevada if it’s located way up in Wyoming? Enter the new theories. The Yellowstone hotspot hasn’t always been in Wyoming. It’s moved, or rather it stayed in one place in the mantle and the continental plate moved over the hotspot. Sixteen million years ago, what we now call Idaho was over the hotspot. Geologists have found evidence of a caldera related to Yellowstone in southern Idaho. There are theories that put northern Nevada over the ancestral hotspot 42 million years ago. Remember, the continental plates are always moving. It would make life easier for geologists if they stayed in one place. It’s just too much of a coincidence. The age of the Carlin-type gold deposits is the same age as when northern Nevada was over the ancestral hotspot. If the gold deposits are related to the Yellowstone hotspot and the surface expression of the hotspot has moved, then a good place to look for more Carlin-type deposits is to follow the movement of the surface exposure of the hotspot from where it was 42 million years ago to where it is today. Now you understand why I was in Idaho this summer. It wasn’t the fishing, although that is an added bonus, just like the bison, wolves and grizzlies of Yellowstone. This research season, I hope to contribute an article every two weeks to the Kingman Miner. The articles will include topics of Mohave County geology and other related subjects that I think will be of interest to other rockhounds like me. https://kdminer.com/news/2021/sep/18/mohave-county-geology-yellowstone-hotspot/
    1 point
  42. Actually, the hotspot was never under northern Nevada. Southern Idaho moved in an arc over the hotspot. The Carlin trend is 100 miles south of that arc. Also the Carlin trend is near the northern end of the impact crater that formed the Great Basin. It's more likely the trend was caused by that massive meteorite, at least IMHO. And, there's very little gold in southern Idaho, unfortunately. Another theory of geologists is that the actual hotspot is about 150 miles northwest of where it comes to the surface. The deep faults that bring it to the surface angle to the southeast. It's more likely the hotspot, is responsible for the gold in the Liberty District of Washington. Jim
    1 point
  43. A big specimen was found at the LSD recently and yes I have seen it. It is in orange stained Quartz with gold spider webbed all through it along with blobs of gold! Very water rounded as well which was interesting and it has a lot of gold in it! How this one has waited this long to be found is mindboggling, but I can't share a location. Guess everyone figured it was just too loud a target to be gold
    1 point
  44. I remember hearing about some really rare gold coins being found in San Francisco when they tore up some old sidewalks.
    1 point
  45. Love that first photo! Yeah I like my old Chevy for many of the same reasons. My new Tacoma from 2005 came and went, but the 1994 Chevy is still me favorite beast!
    1 point
  46. I moved to Colorado Springs recently from the Phoenix Az area and planning to go to the local GPAA chapter meetings soon. Hope to start prospecting here. Left all my equipment with my buddy in Arizona 'tho. Been doing some research on Colorado placers. When you get GOLD FEVER, you never get over it.
    1 point
  47. HJ is pretty darned close. I have developed a new branch of science called "Theogeology" The Planet we live on today is certainly not the same as it was 20.000 years ago- BY DESIGN. One of these days we will have an asteroid delivered to our doorstep so we can study it at our leisure.
    1 point
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