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  1. chrisski

    chrisski

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    Morlock

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  3. Bedrock Bob

    Bedrock Bob

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  4. Electrician

    Electrician

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/16/2021 in Posts

  1. This is an artifact that came off a statue. I was being very, very diplomatic for even suggesting otherwise. I can't think of any process whether it's mummification, petrification or fossilization that would produce anything close to what resembles the hand in the photo.
    3 points
  2. Very little water in Big bug, haven't been to Wolf recently. Lynx might have better water. Later...Jim P.
    3 points
  3. You could always bring 10 gal. of water and a tub to pan in. Dry creeks are a lot easier to dig in than one that keeps filling up with water. Tom H.
    3 points
  4. Rio’s discovery of lithium at Boron was a fluke. The miner was actually testing Boron’s tailings to see whether the presence of gold was significant and found instead traces of lithium at a concentration higher than domestic projects under development. “We were looking for gold… but we found something better than gold: battery-grade lithium – and the potential to produce a lot of it,” Alex Macdonald, senior engineer at the plant
    2 points
  5. A cargo net and a snatch block, with a hand crank winch works very well, Grubstake
    2 points
  6. I immediately thought of Pompeii and bodies encased in hot ash. Pompeii can't be unique.
    2 points
  7. I know this is an older post but here is some great info about manually moving boulders and other heavy loads, and how to split boulders using hand tools: https://tahoerimtrail.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/USFS-Griphoist-and-Rigging-Techniques-Presentation.pdf
    2 points
  8. This would be the late time of year for any chance of water, not much snow pack anywhere so I wouldn't have high hopes. We usually muck around Turkey and Black Canyon Creek because the spring run off makes for some nice water for a few weeks in late March early April.
    2 points
  9. Now put that definition in context of his answer to the question and let me know what you think. I wouldn't waste my time defending him. Anyone that would phrase an answer like that deserves to be called out. Just my opinion Electrician. It's not a poke at you at all. --------- This is obviously not a fossilized hand. It is an artifact. It is an artistic rendition of a hand. It is even decorated. It isn't a fossil. It is an artifact. And the guy that is trying to tell us it is a fossil is posting creepy schist in his third post. If it looks like a duck and q
    2 points
  10. We're members of RoadRunner. She just started going out with me over the past month. She bought herself a GM1000, but figured out she HATES metal detecting, the shear amount of bullets and trash on RoadRunner claims has crushed her spirits metal detecting. About 12-13 years ago I took her out to one of Woody Wampler's gigs and she loved the whole panning thing, so, I switched gears with her and decided to take her out panning. We've been panning Lynx Creek every weekend for over a month now. She loves to crevice bedrock, doesn't mind shoveling and filling buckets. She's still getting th
    2 points
  11. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levant
    2 points
  12. Thank you so much I would like to assure you that this hand is fossilized and it is not part of a statue, would an x-ray help?
    2 points
  13. I think it is difficult to believe. I believe we are being trolled.
    2 points
  14. I don't think it's a fossil. It looks more like part of an old statue that was buried, covered and over time and some type of mineralization growth occured on the tips. There's another possiblity but depends on where it was found. If that's where it came from, the correct term to use would be petrification, not fossilization. Where did it come from?
    2 points
  15. My panning tubs are cement mixing tubs from Home Depot. I transport water in 5 gallon buckets. If you guys have a drywasher, that's one way to pan the cons out.
    2 points
  16. Tough to tell from the photo, but the ground-window picts, around the edge of the grind where I would expect to see a thin layer of fusion crust I do not see anything resembling; it appears to be more of an oxidation coating than a fusion crust. Also tough to tell from the photo is if the interior is metal, or is it a semi-metallic luster like you'd get from filing hematite/magnetite? Regmaglypt size is a function of the size of the body upon which they form. I would expect reg's on a rock of this size to be respectively larger, and not as uniform in size/spacing. Also, if you look
    2 points
  17. Electrician, I’ve found it very hard to get any reviews of a specific area unless the club you belong to has a website that allows members to post reviews to. The GPAA allows member reviews for the claims. I’ve found water very spotty in Arizona. When the GPAA had claims along the river in Black Canyon city, I only saw the water running once in the dozen times I went out there. The other times there was water, but in puddles every mile or so, and sometimes not on the claims. Even Lynx creek is spotty, although you can usually dig deep enough and the bottom of the hole will fill up
    2 points
  18. Is this one a fulgurite? Here are two tektites and two concretions with kind-of-similar shapes. Maybe some concretions are fossils of tektites?
    2 points
  19. Thanks Clay. I did not look at the link you put in earlier. I knew there had to be a better map than the forest service had posted. That Master Title Plat has good detail. Maybe 10 years ago, I created my own map based off the rather crude map from link I posted. That was all I could find at the time. It was quite the exercise. I used USGS maps to plot the boundaries. Of course the map I was putting together covered the intersection of four of those maps. At least all the datum on the maps were the same. Once I actually got to Lynx creek, The area I decided to go to was well withi
    2 points
  20. It's about 6.5 inches it weighs 307 grams I could see metal , after scratching of suspected fusion crust. Scratch test. I want to cut it but I think I'll leave as is I'll get it tested.
    2 points
  21. If you look at the official map for lynx creek, there are some areas along the creek that are not part of the withdrawal area for whatever reason. Prescott National Forest - Recreation (usda.gov) Without having been to any of Clay's sites he mentioned, these two yellow areas look like either private property or patented claims. I checked Lynx creek for open areas years ago, and found nothing. I checked for miles to the South. There was some open ground perhaps a mile to the West on some pretty steep hills. Who knows what is open there now. There is an AMRA claim that borders
    2 points
  22. Nope, we ain't going through this again!
    2 points
  23. Glad you sold it.. Hard to believe I paid 6G for mine new....and they are at this price now. Oh well. It paid for itself and had a ton of fun along the way Tom H.
    2 points
  24. Sold. Thanks Nuggetshooter! Now I get to go appliance shopping, yay...
    2 points
  25. Arizona has some sweet lithium deposits just west of Morristown
    1 point
  26. This one is just beautiful the picture doesn't do it justice, its coarse has some nice sparkle when the sun hits it. 2 Grams of California gold from the famous Motherlode region of California. 135.00 includes shipping
    1 point
  27. Ruby in fuchsite and it's fluorescent in long wave.
    1 point
  28. the images remind me of the Buddhist monk who was mummified and encased in a statue
    1 point
  29. I heard that last year the mineral withdrawal was up for renewal documentation by some state or federal agency and they missed the deadline which left the area open to claim for a few days until the documents were filed. Several savvy prospectors jumped on the opportunity and staked claims. This is what I heard so please take that with a grain of salt, I have no idea of these government withdrawal workings.
    1 point
  30. Bingo! That is a bit different than mine but the same idea. That is a good tool! It is equal to a vacuum for cleaning bedrock. You just can't get it done under water with (almost) any other tool.
    1 point
  31. You need to be banned immediately.
    1 point
  32. I would imagine an x-ray might help but I just don't think it's a fossil. That area is littered with ruins from the ages and it's part of a statue. You'd have to really convince me otherwise.
    1 point
  33. Most likely it's part of a statue so a DNA test is not going to be helpful. I suggest you contact an archeology dept at a local university near where you live. But be careful... if they know who you are and where you live..it could be confiscated.
    1 point
  34. 1 point
  35. The photos aren't great and it is sometimes tough to tell by a photo. But it looks metallic to me. I would say it warrants further investigation.
    1 point
  36. Thank you! Have you read this article http://adsabs.harvard.edu/pdf/1950PA.....58R..35L
    1 point
  37. Here's my new opal
    1 point
  38. Hi there, Looks like a terrestrial rock to me as well, but I’m no expert and don’t claim to be one. I look at the color, and the “angles”. They form somewhat 90° points that something that big, looking as it does, would have alblated a lot more IMO. And the color looks off too, I like to say ‘poop’ brown. That’s almost black and consistent with basalt. Just my opinion, and as I always say, “Opinions are like belly buttons, everyone has one.” Jayray
    1 point
  39. Yep its a flat firing pin for a rimfire cartridge. Pretty neat peice of history.
    1 point
  40. Hello everyone, i hope you're all doing well. The boys and i headed out again Saturday to go chase some gold and relics with my friend Larry. He didn't make it out last year with us at all due to his age and the Covid stuff so this was his first time out in over a year. He ended up getting a new Equinox 600 so we wanted to train him on it. Well Cameron my oldest son was running his GP Extreme chasing gold and his first target of the day was this pistol. Cant get any manufacturer info or any other markings off of it yet, but i think it is a Hopkins and Allen 32 caliber. Still looking into it. P
    1 point
  41. I assume you mean fairy stones. They can be found in Virginia and you can hunt them in a state park or on private property. Lots of information in this link. https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/blog/legend-of-the-fairy-stone
    1 point
  42. Finding Placer Gold with a Metal Detector and a Breaker Bar Click here to view Video Armed with a Breaker Bar and a Minelab SDC 2300, a White's Gold Master V-Sat Jeff and Gary ( Two Toe's ) head back to the Gravel Bar to finish up the search for Placer Gold Nuggets !!!!! Jeff brings the Big Breaker Bar and it boulder moving time on the creek while Gary searchs the high and Low bench for those elusive Nuggets. See what the guys find with there Metal detectors while working the Bedrock crevices both High and low !!!!! SG 037 Thanks for watching !!!!
    1 point
  43. Need this gone. The wife has been nagging me for a new range, " You buy these detectors but I cant get a decent oven that works right!". Please help... Price drop for nuggetshooter members $2200.
    1 point
  44. Thank you. I was one of those low-maintenance rock-moving contraptions a few decades ago. Theoretically, it builds character.
    1 point
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