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  1. chrisski

    chrisski

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/12/2019 in all areas

  1. The rivers would be the easiest route of travel, especially the more pack animals that are taken on a trip. I would put likely routes of travel on any of those rivers listed on the maps and would not be surprised if at some point exploration parties were not sent out along any of those rivers. Some of the Spanish exploration parties were rather big, and I think they would of sent at least scouting parties up some of the tributaries. For the 300 years they were in AZ, the Spanish were in the new world to make money to take back to the old world, so in the amount of time they were here, not s
    2 points
  2. There are instances where the BLM retains mining rights on State Trust Land, but for me its way to complicated to research, and there's way to much open BLM land. I asked Clay about some BLM claims filed on State Trust Land on the other side of the Hassunyumpa river South of Castle Hot Springs Road. My less than perfect memory remembers him saying there are certain instances where the BLM gives land to the State, which I think is in Early Statehood or pre-Statehood, but retains the BLM retains the subsurface rights. For me researching this is near impossible because unfortunately you ne
    2 points
  3. Most BLM that changes hands is a result of a land swap. They give up some land in exchange for access somewhere else. At least that is the way it goes in New Mexico. There is a pretty strict set of guidelines about that. You have to be pretty important to game that system. BLM land just does not change hands unless there is justification of some sort and it goes through a swap process. If BLM is turning into State Trust then there are probably some acres of State Trust or private land that is creating access to some BLM or National Forest somewhere. There are public records of that
    2 points
  4. This is very interesting! My father in law grew up in West Texas near Uvalde...He said that when he was around 11 or 12, he was hiking up a canyon and saw a small cave opening...He was able to squeeze himself partly into the cave to where he could look in with his flashlight ... He said he saw a skeleton with spanish armor and helmet...There was a rotted bag mixed with a pile of gold ... He was afraid to force himself through the tight opening and decided he would wait until he had someone else with him to help him bring out the finds ...When he and some friends went back more than a year la
    1 point
  5. SPANISH EXPLORERS IN THE BRADSHAWS? (part 3) Points To Consider: Whether or not Spanish missionaries, or Indians directed by the Spanish, engaged in any mining North of the Gila river in Arizona, is to me, totally irrelevant to the topical issue of the possible historical existence and presence of Spanish explorers in the Bradshaws. The point is this: The Spanish were certainly in the general vicinity North of the Bradshaw Mts and were seeking, discovering and mining valuable metal deposits. Whether they passed through the Bradshaws or not, remains an open question, however a logical infe
    1 point
  6. SPANISH EXPLORERS IN THE BRADSHAWS? (part 2) From the Historical Record: "In 1583, (some records show 1582), a Spanish expedition under Antonio de Espejo departed Zuni, New Mexico, entering Eastern Arizona searching for gold and silver. They continued West/North West, ultimately crossing the little Colorado river and the Verde river. Near present-day Jerome, the Spaniards found "rich silver and copper deposits", where Espejo saw a large mine shaft that had been hacked out of the rocks by the Indians who used the oxidized copper ores for paints and pigment. Nearby, a large canyon that emp
    1 point
  7. SPANISH EXPLORERS IN THE BRADSHAWS? (part 1) The location of the disputed "Mine Trail Monuments" is in the Black Canyon area of the Bradshaw Mts (N/W of Black Canyon City) The Bradshaw Mts area is/was considered a "world class" gold area, roughly 40 miles long by 25 miles wide (highly mineralized) with numerous mines, prospects, gossan outcrops and placer gold deposits) In many places, it is steep, rough, rugged country. In a previous forum discussion, the following was authoritatively asserted: (supposedly, to show proof that the Spanish never ventured as far as the Bradshaw Mts of Arizona
    1 point
  8. Newsboy etc. are my backyard. There has been no transfer of land to the State in that area since 1971. Chris is right. It is possible to make a federal mining claim on some State Trust lands. It's not as straightforward as a regular mining claim but it is possible. A little less than a million acres of State Trust lands have the minerals reserved to the United States. That's a big chunk of woohoo! but don't expect the State or the BLM to make it easy. There is a lot more to know before you claim State lands, the first and most important being that you can't prospect for a claim norma
    1 point
  9. @Andyy, ALL meteorites have Iron (Except Carbonaceous Chrondrites, Lunar, Martian, Howardites, and a FEW VERY RARE TYPES) - NOT DETECTABLE - NO IRON . You can grind down a small section and you will always see iron "Flakes" unless it is a Pallasite (IE Stoney / Iron in which you will have olivine, the extraterrestrial version of peridot), and complete Iron Meteorites which literally feels like pure iron which is a Nickle/Iron Matrix. The stone that "Brownnugget" Was showing would've fallen under the "Common Chrondrite" - H5 or L4 more than likely type meteorite which is still rar
    1 point
  10. They react in exactly the same way when they encounter someone sniffing drainpipes and mumbling incoherently.
    1 point
  11. The Roadrunner Prospector's club had several good claims years ago. I would imagine that they still do. https://www.roadrunnergold.com/ https://www.roadrunnergold.com/membership-information/
    1 point
  12. This is one of the weirdest and most fun reads I've had in a long time. The thousands of pages on Spanish signs and symbols is always good fun to see a discussion on - we've had quite a few of them over the years but few as far out as this one. There have been some signs and symbols found, well-known and true, but building rock outcrops with mortar was not among them no matter how long you stare at them - I sure wish, since it seems BMc you had a camera with you, that you'd taken a moment to snap one of some of these clues. and Bob your Feb. 28th post had me literally crying with lau
    1 point
  13. Looks like an old meteorite, like Gold Basin, Arizona...
    1 point
  14. NICE GOLD! I suggest you grind a window and take a look...it could be a low iron/nickel chrondrite. fred
    1 point
  15. Click in description to enter
    1 point
  16. Btw no junk. Minelab Pro-find 35’s and an equinox 800 just to start off. There will be more
    1 point
  17. First off let me start by saying I am not sponsored, back, or paid by any company or dealer. I purchase this equipment out right. I’ve been a member here for sometime and those that know me no this is real
    1 point
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