Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums

Leaderboard

  1. MonsterGuppy

    MonsterGuppy

    Nugget Shooter Members


    • Points

      5

    • Content Count

      58


  2. GeoJack

    GeoJack

    Nugget Shooter Members


    • Points

      2

    • Content Count

      1,461


  3. chrisski

    chrisski

    Nugget Shooter Members


    • Points

      2

    • Content Count

      1,460


  4. Swampstomper Al

    Swampstomper Al

    Nugget Shooter Members


    • Points

      1

    • Content Count

      1,944


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/14/2016 in all areas

  1. These are Southern California gpz7000 nuggets from my last 5 trips out to the Desert areas.
    5 points
  2. Had to throw this one in. Not truly photoshopped, but made to look much bigger than it is. This may meet some people definition of a picker, others may think its a flake. However in this pic to the untrained eye, may appear as a nugget. You can hear it when you drop it on the pan, but you have to be perfectly still and hold your breath to hear it drop. Its still tiny. I think everyone here can pick up that this a blow up of a very tiny piece.
    2 points
  3. Just worked one up. What do you think?
    1 point
  4. I was just funnin around Al but I'll grab those images and give it another go.
    1 point
  5. Try throwin' some more shadow and contrast at it, to darken the pan / pan photo it's in.. That should make it pop better.. Part of the problem is the wood surface the pan is sitting on.. It'll never look correct under the low density washed out pan, since that surface is washed out too.. Crop it tighter to just show enough of the pan for ppl to know it's sitting in a pan.. Then it should be easier to add density and contrast to that part.. The under-the-microscope looks really good.. So try to bring the pan to match that, not the other way around.. Swamp PS: Twenty+ years i
    1 point
  6. So I moved over here so as not to further hi-jack the other thread as we seemed to get a bit off subject. The hypothesis I presented on the Rye Patch thread stemmed from an idea I had way back when I was going to ASU for chemistry. The professor was talking about something, probably important, and I started thinking about ways to store energy from lightning strikes. I know people have attempted things like this using electronics and capacitors and the like. The unpredictable nature and the huge surge of current are most likely why this isn't being done on a commercial scale, if at
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...