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  1. Terry Soloman

    Terry Soloman

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    Bedrock Bob

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/13/2020 in Posts

  1. Got an invitation to hunt an old farm in Katonah, New York, and drove up excited and early. After nearly two-hours of hunting near the old stone fences I had found nothing but junk targets, and I was ready to call it quits. I started back toward the farm house and the car, swinging half-heartedly, and feeling a bit defeated. About halfway back, I got a high tone that stopped me in my tracks. 39-40, solid as could be. Surprise! 1883 Philadelphia Morgan!!!!! Talk about your Happy Dance, I went from worn out to full of energy just like that!
    9 points
  2. California Motherload placer nugget exhibiting hopper crystalline structure (Chevron nugget) Unique specimen was sourced and mined in El Dorado County Weight is 0.5 Grams $50 plus shipping cost
    4 points
  3. I met him once when I dropped of a type specimen for an iron he analyzed, he sat and talked with me in his office for probably and hour, and then walked me down to the lab to see the new 200 pound Canyon Diablo they were going to be adding to the display room. Such an intelligent and enthusiastic man, I'm lucky to have that memory. R.I.P. Dr. Wasson.
    3 points
  4. Thank you all! Still have a skip in my step!
    3 points
  5. Terry great find! You might want to detect half heartedly from now on!!
    3 points
  6. You can use Whink instead which contains diluted hfl acid but takes a very long time to get the results you probably want. But very safe to use.
    3 points
  7. Thank you, this was more than helpful I appreciate it !
    2 points
  8. Glass (silica) is used to flux metal when smelting. Molten metals will oxidize rapidly. So silica (quartz, glass, etc.)is added to the furnace to cover the molten metal and keep it away from oxygen. The glass in the furnace works exactly like the silica covering an arc welding rod or the shielding gas in a MIG or Heli arc process. Any time you melt or weld metal there is something to keep it from gobbling up oxygen. Smelting under a puddle of molten glass is the cheapest and most popular way to accomplish this.
    2 points
  9. Hi, I'm new to the forums & new to hunting.
    2 points
  10. Hello everyone, Joining the group from Colorado. I don't know what's up with me but I like rocks. As I think about it, it is a free hobby for me and so that's good! Looking forward to interacting with the group. Latchkey
    2 points
  11. Any suggesting for best place to offer specimen gold for sale? Doesn't seem to generate much interest on this site. I have some specimens headed for the dolly pot if I don't sell them as specimens. Hate to crush up rare crystalline gold specimens if there is a market for them.
    2 points
  12. Just looks like a chunk of brown jasper with an agate seam to me.
    1 point
  13. Glass is made from sand..silica, the glass look is from silica that was part of the impurities in whatever was being refined.
    1 point
  14. Darn, was hoping for something cool . :( I wonder how it got that glass look and feel ??
    1 point
  15. That is a chunk of refractory waste from an arc furnace. Slag.
    1 point
  16. I attended several lectures at UCLA and John was always there. Here is an article about his life. https://newsroom.ucla.edu/stories/in-memoriam-john-wasson-cosmochemist-and-co-creator-the-ucla-meteorite-collection
    1 point
  17. That’s got to be a thrill. Great job !
    1 point
  18. Good on you Terry. That is one that I'd like to find some day. Perseverance pays bro. Old Tom
    1 point
  19. 1 point
  20. Pic represent what I used to call Rhyolite. I know for a fact that it is a Rhyolite, and that it has small garnets embedded in it. But I now know that what I have been calling Rhyolite is not exclusive of the term nor of the color.
    1 point
  21. "Rhyolite is a rock (a silica rich volcanic rock) It can be a lava flow, volcanic ash or an obsidian that has devitrified (glass broken down into minerals). When it gets silicified, it can be termed a jasper - focusing on a term that makes it salable, or "ocean jasper" or some other glitzy term put on it by retailers"
    1 point
  22. Mariposa MT Bullion Distict. Thanks!
    1 point
  23. OUCH lol but these are the moments that teach us as well! I see very decieving! Okay thanks for the info! Yes my dad also explained this to me after. Def sounds like a better idea ;).
    1 point
  24. Finding Gold with a Metal Detector and a Breaker Bar Jeff and Gary (Two Toe's)head to a secret spot in the mother lode to look for Gold Nuggets with the Minelab SDC 2300 and a Breaker Bar . Moving Boulder and checking underneath them has paid off in the past and using a breaker bar makes in a little easier. As the day warms up Jeff hits the creek and does some sniping... what could be better than finding gold and staying cool at the same time !!! SG 023
    1 point
  25. If you’re around the White tank mountains, there’s a little bit of mining history to that area. Not much of it is written down and its hard to locate, but there’s a couple of old copper mines, not sure how big, could have been a one person operation, or a small pit, I’ve never looked but seen it on a map, a few manganese dig sites, and supposedly some old small gold sites around Aguilla. There’s rumors of a gold placer somewhere on the mountain, but not sure I believe that one. THe historical USGS maps available on line give locations of these mines, and a minedat search shows some data
    1 point
  26. Back in the days when dinosaurs ruled the earth there was a good market for smaller pieces of ore. Lots of guys were buying detectors and spending lots of time in the field. They all made good money and wanted a piece of ore. Now days it is different. It is not a popular hobby any more and prospectors dont have a lot of spending money. I hope you can find a buyer to give you what you want for them. After I sold my gold back in 2009 it cured my gold fever. I have been out and found some gold since but I never was as driven to look for it. It is just a cool thing I used to do now. I
    1 point
  27. I definitely wouldn't crush them. Be patient. Have you thought about selling at a local rock and gem show? Also, I would consider removing some if not most of the quartz with hfl acid to expose more gold. Aesthetics matter....
    1 point
  28. I remember laying in my tent that night thinking.... I hope I dont get struck by lightning.....
    1 point
  29. Nice chunky piece. What district?
    1 point
  30. This FB page has over 1000 of them. Pretty interesting! Tom H. https://www.facebook.com/westernmininghistory/photos/?ref=page_internal
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. I actually met Forest Fenn when I lived in Glorieta. There is a fellow there who is a collector of military weapons. He has a VERY extensive collection of guns. It is a private "museum" that is open by invitation only. I lived just up the road in a guest house. The owner knew the collector in a very personal way. We often "talked guns" as well as meteorites, gold and artifacts. He often said that he needed to introduce me to the "fellow down the road". Long story short we were both invited to an afternoon soiree at the gun museum. The collector was having an afternoon get togeth
    1 point
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