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VINTAGE MINING PHOTOS

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Vintage photos and drawings and discussion of same only, should be some cool stuff show up here and ad info if possible.

28 topics in this forum

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  1. Alaska 1880s

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  2. 1880s again

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  3. Horses mined too

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  4. Miners.....

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  5. The Cornish....

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  6. Unknown Miner....

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  7. Colorado 1800s

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  8. Klondike 1800s

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  9. AZ 1800s

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  10. Chinese Miners

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  • Posts

    • Hydrazine contaminated parts are nasty. I buried a whole aircraft carrier steam system in the New Mexico desert because a sailor put too much in the boiler system. Hydrazine was spilled on the ground during tests at the Las Cruces facility and contaminated the entire aquifer. We drilled hundreds of wells and pumped all the ground water out of the ground, filtered and cleaned it with UV light, and then pumped it back into the aquifer.  One of NASA's biggest fears is a hydrazine tank falling back to earth. There is a plan in place in case that ever happens. No joke buddy. If you can smell it you have been overexposed for life. That tank is nothing to be fiddling around with. The people who found it and are handling it are running a big health risk. I was part of the effort to collect the Challenger Disaster junk and a big part of my work at NASA was dealing with hydrazine contamination. The fuel tank and piping were of utmost importance to the recovery effort. They washed the parts in detergent, exposed the liquid to UV light and then evaporated the water to clean the stuff. Every part that had ever been in contact with fuel was decontaminated in this fashion before handling.  
    • Ben, You are right.  Lots of stories now about 70. https://watchers.news/2018/10/19/iridium-satellite-fuel-tank-crash-california-october-2018/ Mitchel
    • Ben, Hi ... been a while. Where did you get the area of the fall? The tank in the walnut grove would certainly be on private land.  That would be a problem.  What's the value of Iridium 70 pieces right now? I'm thinking they don't say much about this space junk because they don't know how 'hot' a particular piece would be after bouncing off the atmosphere.  It 'could' make a lot of news here but they are kinda keeping it under the radar. Mitchel
    • Grubstake, The event 4094 was headed in a northerly direction. The pieces described landing in Hanford could very well be part of what we saw.  It came from south to north.   Where I was north of Ridgecrest would put it in line of going over Bakersfield before it slowed down and stopped burning ... or at least some of it.  I think other pieces would be much farther north. Mitchel
    • There's a ton of wisdom in that post.  My path in life was similar, just in a different part of the world, and I raised daughters on my own, instead of a son.  I suspect a son would have been less complicated, but I'm satisfied with my lot.
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