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    • a thing to think about is...If you buy a detector from Bill , you also get instructions too...in my opinion it would be...GLOD monster for just  GOLD OR Equinox 800 for general hunting, Talk to Bill about your choice on either machine...can't go wrong buying from a GREAT dealer.....my opinion.
    • Hey thanks BMc. I'll study them. They tout quality and their detectors do look pretty good. Oh i was going to ask do you go out metal detecting in the summer's here in AZ? I want to but i don't want the heat to slowly kill my new detector.
    • Or, you could just wait awhile 'til the weather heats up a bit and leave it out in the sun for about 30 seconds with a raw egg, hash browns and bacon on top of it. Then finger it with a little bacon grease, slip it over the coil and have breakfast!
    • I've run across a couple of users in the field who had good things to say about the Gold Racer. At 54 kHz they should be sensitive to smaller, as well as larger nuggets. The comments were that hot rocks/mineralization is still an issue (at Wickenberg) but manageable. You might look at the Makro Multi Kruzer which has three frequencies to choose from (5 kHz, 14 kHz and 19 kHz). Features: Waterproof to 5 meters (16 feet) and increased depth function. Basically similar ability to handle hot ground. Expectations are that it will be OK in moderate to slightly hot areas but the real hot stuff will still be an issue as with "most" VLF detectors. I just picked one up for a combo coin, water and prospecting tool to see how it performs. It seems to be built well, has a good screen/meter set up, rechargeable batter plus extra battery pack option. Accurate on coins, and discriminates satisfactorily on ferrous, trash and bottle caps so far IMO. I'll try it in the gold fields later this summer. You might also check out the Makro Gold Kruzer at 61 kHz. Good reviews and features on that one as well.
    • Fred, I would bet that the cover is PVC thermoplastic. PVC is easily reshaped at about 175 degrees. It will start losing form at about 220. Any PVC (or other thermoplastic) has a "sweet spot" as far as heat goes and that is when the inside of the piece reaches the optimum forming temperature. The surface is often much hotter and you need to be careful not to overheat the surface and small projections trying to get the core temp right. . Slowly preheat the item in the oven to about 160 degrees and then take it the rest of the way with a heat gun (not a blow dryer. A blow dryer does not get hot enough to form thermoplastic). A round object like that could be placed on a lazy susan or some other spinning device so you could spin it and evenly heat up those fingers without taking it out of the oven. The trick is to get the core temps into the thermoforming range without overheating the surface and this takes patience. Most guys get in too big a hurry and overheat the items in one spot and warp things. That big flat surface would be easy to tweak if the heat was uneven. I have made a bunch of PVC items like knife sheaths (Kydex), handgun holsters (Kydex), detector poles (PVC) and all sorts of mounting brackets. I have also done a pantload of plastic welding on HDPE, LDPE and ABS items. Kayaks are rotomolded thermoplastic HDPE and they are easy to re-shape, weld and modify. It is all the same with any thermoplastic as long as you know the exact temperature range you need to shape, bend or weld.  I use a laser surface thermometer and my kitchen oven to preheat the item to the proper temps for forming and then take it the rest of the way with a heat gun. I know the output temp of the heat gun because I checked it with a mercury thermometer on the various settings. Since you don't need to weld or reshape anything all you really need to do is get the piece above 160 degrees all the way to the core without overheating. I would simply pop it in the oven with a pizza pan under it and foil over it to keep an even temp. Let it sit in the heat for ten minutes or so to insure the core temps are the same as the surface temps and then push it down on the coil. It will go below the forming temps really quick and get solid fast as long as you don't get it way too hot.  There are lots of HDPE and PVC items that you could make your own covers out of for pennies. I make all sorts of stuff out of "Playskool" kids toys which are HDPE thermoplastic. Pieces big enough to form coil covers are readily available and you could form one as easily as you could fit the factory cover on your coil. I make awesome shake guards, metatarsal guards and all sorts of cool items from old kids toys. Old milk jugs, water cans and 5 gallon buckets can be easily re-shaped into almost anything you need. All it takes is knowing what type of plastic you have and the proper temperatures to form it.  You can easily weld a new bottom on a coil cover getting thin, repair a hole in a kayak or make a holster for your Glock out of a kid's toy. All it takes is the proper temperature range and filler material.
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