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HUNTING, FISHING, GUNS, and SUCH

As the title says this forum is for members to share stuff about Hunting, fishing, guns, etc.

483 topics in this forum

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  1. You Go Hi-Point!!!

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  2. You go girl!!

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  3. Wow

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  4. Work in progress

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  5. Won't be long...

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  6. Willow springs lake trip

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  7. WHO NEEDS GUNS 1 2

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  8. WHEN WHEEL GUNS WERE KING!

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  9. WHAT'S IN YOUR GO BAG? 1 2

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  10. What do you carry? 1 2

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  11. Went Fishing

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  12. Well it's done

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  • Posts

    • Lol. I hear ya   There's no way i'm giving up I love our outdoors too much. I really like going to these new places. It's like a trading card you can put in your collection. Soon as i get my "Buggy" i'll be good. P.S, Honda Pioneer 500 = Buggy  
    • HATCH (NM) CHILE VERDE: Thought I would bump Artic Dave"s recipe/post from last year, which has very good photos and process details, and include a local recipe from here in the Hatch Valley area as a regional variation which is a perennial favorite any time of year but especially when the "frost is on the punkin" THE MEAT: A few common ingredients include: Pork Butt Roast, which is often used, but stew meat size chunks of pork (or slightly larger) is popular as well.  The "Holy Trinity" of herbs/spices used in Mexican cooking is Garlic, Onion, and Cumin (Comino) Oregano follows closely in the mix. There are others more esoteric but these are basic.  THE GREEN CHILE: Fresh, frozen or canned? Hot, Medium or Mild?  All are acceptable but mixing heat levels; ie, a small amount of hot, followed by medium and mild according to preference generally works well. Locally, fresh Hatch Chile is pretty much required in season when available, and frozen when out of season. But 505 brand is good and some brands of canned Chile are pretty good as well.  THE PROCESS: Place roast (or pork chunks) in Dutch Oven or similar container, cover with water and bring to boil. Pour off water, and meat curdle. Repeat if necessary. We want the meat to be as clean and pristine as possible for a superior finished product. If left whole, you might like to then brown the roast in a small amount of oil and cover pot with water and cook until it boils off the bone. Adding some garlic and onion to season the meat while it cooks doesn't hurt. When the roast pork can be de-boned, chunk up the meat, add garlic, onion, cumin and green Chile, (1/4 teaspoon oregon if used), toss in a small can, about a 1/4 to 1/2 cup of tomatillo/jalapeno sauce (or a few fresh tomatillos) if desired, (adds to the overall finish), toss in 2-3 beef bullion cubes or a little broth for depth of flavor. Cook until meat is tender and the taste is how you want it, 2-6 hrs depending upon quantity and size of meat chunks. (slow cookers work also) TIPS: Remember, always cook to taste. If you like it, chances are others will too. I don't add salt. I might include an additional bullion cube toward the end instead if necessary, either beef or chicken and a little black pepper to round out the flavor.  Taste it about half way through the cooking process and if the flavor isn't where you want it, don't be afraid to keep adding Garlic,Onion powder/granules and Cumin powder. The flavor of the spices tends to fade a bit during cooking but go easy on the Oregano. It is strong and makes  lot of oil.  Note: The wrinkled bag of green Chile in the photo is from last years "Big Jim" harvest  which I needed to use up to make room for the current crop.   
    • Don't give up. Get a new girlfriend if necessary. 
    • Sweet shiny stuff  . Is that one clean out , or a days of hard work ?  
    • Bob said to ask forgiveness and not permission.  To be clear I dont look for open ground to prospect. I look for the best ground to prospect and do what I need to do to get on it. That is often patented land and/or corporate claims. Lots of guys hyper focus on land status and finding "open" areas. My advice is to focus on inroads to the best areas. It is easier to find a spot you can work on excellent ground than it is to find gold on crappy ground.  The best areas are claimed. The guys who get the gold work those areas. If you want to be one of those guys you gotta work those areas too.  If you are just shaking a pan for a few colors then a club is the best bet.  Developing inroads to good ground will pay off much better than finding an unclaimed area. At least for a new guy. Someone who knows a district and has wide experience at finding gold may locate some unclaimed ground to work. But a newbie needs to learn to work gold on producing ground and then tackle the hinterlands. Again just my opinion. I have never found any gold and I probably don't even know what I am talking about. All I know about it I learned on the internet.    
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    1. Lvuman
      Lvuman
      (70 years old)
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