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  2. Bedrock Bob

    October 11 Fireball Event 4094

    Hydrazine contaminated parts are nasty. I buried a whole aircraft carrier steam system in the New Mexico desert because a sailor put too much in the boiler system. Hydrazine was spilled on the ground during tests at the Las Cruces facility and contaminated the entire aquifer. We drilled hundreds of wells and pumped all the ground water out of the ground, filtered and cleaned it with UV light, and then pumped it back into the aquifer. One of NASA's biggest fears is a hydrazine tank falling back to earth. There is a plan in place in case that ever happens. No joke buddy. If you can smell it you have been overexposed for life. That tank is nothing to be fiddling around with. The people who found it and are handling it are running a big health risk. I was part of the effort to collect the Challenger Disaster junk and a big part of my work at NASA was dealing with hydrazine contamination. The fuel tank and piping were of utmost importance to the recovery effort. They washed the parts in detergent, exposed the liquid to UV light and then evaporated the water to clean the stuff. Every part that had ever been in contact with fuel was decontaminated in this fashion before handling.
  3. Today
  4. Ben, You are right. Lots of stories now about 70. https://watchers.news/2018/10/19/iridium-satellite-fuel-tank-crash-california-october-2018/ Mitchel
  5. Ben, Hi ... been a while. Where did you get the area of the fall? The tank in the walnut grove would certainly be on private land. That would be a problem. What's the value of Iridium 70 pieces right now? I'm thinking they don't say much about this space junk because they don't know how 'hot' a particular piece would be after bouncing off the atmosphere. It 'could' make a lot of news here but they are kinda keeping it under the radar. Mitchel
  6. Grubstake, The event 4094 was headed in a northerly direction. The pieces described landing in Hanford could very well be part of what we saw. It came from south to north. Where I was north of Ridgecrest would put it in line of going over Bakersfield before it slowed down and stopped burning ... or at least some of it. I think other pieces would be much farther north. Mitchel
  7. Saul R W

    Yesterdays finds

    There's a ton of wisdom in that post. My path in life was similar, just in a different part of the world, and I raised daughters on my own, instead of a son. I suspect a son would have been less complicated, but I'm satisfied with my lot.
  8. Saul R W

    OUTING ATTENDANCE POLL

    And some of us don't have many feathers left. I molted in my late 20s and never grew a new crop on my head. I blame it on too many wives and daughters.
  9. Reno Chris

    Quartz and Gold

    The truth is it varies from place to place and there is no "Universal" rule that is always correct. I've been in places with almost no quartz whatsoever and found gold, and places were nearly every rock on the surface is quartz and found no gold. Yet some other places with lots of quartz I have done well and gotten good gold. I've found gold in places with lots of hematite, and I've found no gold in other places with lots of hematite. I've found gold in places with pretty much zero hematite. I've been asked this sort of question many times. A lot of guys, especially new prospectors, want some set of simple, golden rules that always tell you where the gold will be. Sorry, I've prospected and found gold all over the western USA, including Alaska, as well as Australia and Western Africa and there are no simple, hard and fast rules that always work. You cant even take knowledge of what works in most of Arizona and take that into the Sierra Nevada goldfields of the mother lode. Some stuff will work, but other stuff wont apply. Its true that normally the gold in the big quartz veins (like more than 4 ft thick) is often fine as dust. The coarser gold that can be seen by a detector often comes from smaller veins and stringers nearby. This is why a lot of gold quartz mines that produced thousands of ounces of gold have no detectable gold in the dumps - the gold is tiny particles like dust that cannot be seen by a detector.
  10. Ahorton10

    OUTING ATTENDANCE POLL

    I'll be there with most the brood. I'm planning to get out early this time. Maybe Thursday afternoon or Friday morning.
  11. Uncle Ron

    White's Gold Master V-Sat detector for sale $250

    I love the V-SATS....They are awesome and I've owned about a half dozen of them ...I always buy them when the price is right! ... Cheers, Unc
  12. Regmaglitch

    October 11 Fireball Event 4094

    Will you hunt the triangulated fall area? Ben
  13. Morlock

    Lunar Meteorite Up For Bid.

    Lots of things for $1.00 opening bid but has very little to do with Neil Armstrong himself other then being in his possession at one time.
  14. Yesterday
  15. Happy birthday, I hope you had a great day!
  16. chrisski

    Lunar Meteorite Up For Bid.

    The Neil Armstrong family is auctioning his stuff: https://historical.ha.com/c/search-results.zx?N=49+793+794+792+2088+4294946297&Nty=1&Ntt="Armstrong+Family+Collection"&Ntk=SI_Titles-Desc&ic10=BidBuyTab-071515 Believe the auction closes on November 1st. Some items are priced for the average person to buy.
  17. chrisski

    darn Elizabeth Warren !

    Military got rid of the shot air guns back in the 90's. I got the air gun shots in '88, but for some reason, they use needles for everyone now.
  18. grubstake

    darn Elizabeth Warren !

    Last one of those I had was just before I went to Nam in 67, Hurt like hell. 50cc shot, yes Jerry is getting his in IV, 3 liters one night, and 3 liters the next, don't know if he is getting another 3 tonight or not, I figured, I'd let him rest. Grubstake
  19. Geoffrey Notkin I believe was the owner or the person who arranged it to be auctioned, he is the host and famous meteorite hunter from the TV show Meteorite Men.
  20. Brownnugget

    Quartz and Gold

    I remember Reno Chris at least in his book or a lecture saying nuggets tend to come from smaller vein systems and stringers. Hope I didn’t screw that up but agree with Adam for sure.
  21. Swampstomper Al

    darn Elizabeth Warren !

    Sorry grubstake -- wasn't my intention to make that reply seem to be about the spelling, just the most likely reason they're giving it to him is all.. I only even know about the stuff cos my immune system crapped out back in '93 and I've been running on gamma globulin ever since.. It's stupid expensive too, especially drip / IV.. I bet they're billing him right at 10 grand a bag, and that's no BS..! When I first started taking shots / IM I could get a 30 ml bottle for around $30; drips were in the $1800 -- 2K range.. Today a 10 ml IM bottle runs about $400, and that's if you can even get a 10.. Last couple years all that's been available are 2 ml, which jacks the price even more.. The military gets most of what's mfg'd cos it's used as a Zoster virus vaccination in those slam-bang multi-immunization pistol shots and/or boosters the overseas troops get, which you can bet your bottom $ is the excuse for the insane price hikes out here.. Swamp
  22. grubstake

    October 11 Fireball Event 4094

    Yep, was prob. it . Grubstake
  23. Bedrock Bob

    Be careful out there.

    Awesome example! One of those situations where danger is invisible and really difficult to assess. Lots of guys are screwed before they figure it out. At least with Co2 you know you need air. With other gasses you have no clue until you get weak and you get weak fast. Five men died in 2002 at a research facility in Pasadena. A storage room had a low oxygen environment where an inert pressurized gas had replaced the atmosphere. A researcher opened the door and collapsed in the middle of the floor. His partner walked by, saw him laying there and stepped inside to help. He collapsed. Another person came by. And another. And another. Five went down before number six realized the air was bad. The door was standing wide open to the little room and a pile of guys on the floor. Instead of stepping inside he hit the panic button and called for help. There were several Nitrogen bottles in a cart manifolded together. Hundreds of cubic feet of gas. They were stored in there after an experiment months prior and the door was closed. The main valve was closed but the bottle valves had been left open. There was a small leak in the manifold and it filled the room with nitrogen. It was the perfect trap.
  24. Alwaysdirty

    Be careful out there.

    I'll add to that list of gas hazards. This year in one of our restaurants at work the draft beer quit pouring correctly. I went into the walkin to check the kegs and immediately could tell something was badly wrong and quickly exited. I looked at the CO2 tank and the regulator was frozen up. Some jackals untapped a keg and left the handle open which dumped an entire tall bottle of CO2 into the sealed walking cooler. I could have died in there!!!
  25. Here's a cool video about where I grew up in the Death Valley desert area...Only difference is that when I grew up there, there were no black people...My dad was the head coach and athletic director of the high school for many years and I spent many hours helping tend the all dirt football field... Cheers, Unc
  26. chrisski

    Be careful out there.

    Entering shafts, especially ones marked on a map is quite common. If you've hiked your way up to the area, there's a certain pull that wants you to go in. My last time I went detecting by the tailings piles at some shafts, I saw some rigging that some people used to enter a 45° shaft. A rotted 2 X 6 with a piece of Wal Mart rope going down into a hole. I'm actually surprised these mining accidents do not happen more often. The person that entered this shaft did leave a sample of green copper ore for me to look at. I totally agree with some protocol to enter those mines, and this guy showed an example of a protocol that could be improved quite a bit.
  27. garimpo

    Weird $tuff

    A Brazil Restaurant Visit.... Last week, I took some friends to a new restaurant, 'Igor's Place,' and noticed that the waiter who took our order carried a spoon in his shirt pocket. It seemed a little strange. When the busboy brought our water and utensils, I observed that he also had a spoon in his shirt pocket. Then I looked around and saw that all the staff had spoons in their pockets. When the waiter came back to serve our soup I inquired, 'Why the spoon?'' 'Well, 'he explained, 'the restaurant's owner hired Andersen Consulting to revamp all of our processes. After several months of analysis, they concluded that the spoon was the most frequently dropped utensil. It represents a drop frequency of approximately 3 spoons per table per hour. If our personnel are better prepared, we can reduce the number of trips back to the kitchen and save 15 man-hours per shift.' As luck would have it, I dropped my spoon and he replaced it with his spare. 'I'll get another spoon next time I go to the kitchen instead of making an extra trip to get it right now.' I was impressed. After paying I also noticed that there was a string hanging out of the waiter's fly. Looking around, I saw that all of the waiters had the same string hanging from their flies. So, before he walked off, I asked the waiter, 'Excuse me, but can you tell me why you have that string right there?' 'Oh, certainly!' Then he lowered his voice. 'Not everyone is so observant. That consulting firm I mentioned also learned that we can save time in the restroom. By tying this string to the tip of our you-know-what, we can pull it out without touching it and eliminate the need to wash our hands, shortening the time spent in the restroom by 76.39%. I asked quietly, 'After you get it out, how do you put it back?' 'Well,' he whispered, 'I don't know about the others, but I use the spoon.'
  28. TEMPEDAVE

    OUTING ATTENDANCE POLL

    I'll be there.
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