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  2. Popac I find hot rocks left in the bottom of pre-dug holes all the time. specific gravity of graphite is around 2.25 its pencil lead. AzNuggetBob
  3. Today
  4. I would think it's a bear trying to keep every symmetrically EXACTLY the same. Even a half a thousandths can do strange things in a Combustion chamber. Dang Dave ! Yea was spitting out words way above my pay grade. I had to look em up ! """ Posted by T.O.O. on June 21, 1998 at 12:05:53: In Reply to: What is "quench"? What is a "quench area" Why is it good? n/m posted by body on June 21, 1998 at 10:09:42: Quench, or squish area is typically the flat area on the top of the piston that's almost level with the top of the block deck. It must have a corresponding flat area on the deck surface of the head to qualify as quench. If you look at a combustion chamber, you will usually see these flat areas, and they will have the volume of the actual combustion chamber between them. When the piston is compressing the mixture, as the piston nears the head, the flat areas on the head and piston come together and force the mixture from those areas to "squish" into the chamber, where the spark plug and burning mixture reside, so you achieve a more complete burn. The quench area also runs cooler than the rest of the chamber / piston. These lower temperatures are where the "quench" comes from. When properly designed, the quench areas can have a tremendous effect on the quality of combustion, and allow higher compression ratios, and due to this they are considered "artificial octane" by scientific types. Bottom line is "properly designed, quench is good". .......................................T.O.O. ....................................... ps. As it is like (more octane), and promotes a better burn, why do the turbo people do away with it?? Go figure. """
  5. Yesterday
  6. Hey everyone, i have calculated the density and done streak marks on porculain. Density is between 2.05-2.15. It does not attract magnet hanging on a thread, and does not attract needle hanging on a thread. Streak marks are grey-silverish, similar to the colour of the rock, pencil like. I'm open to any suggestions now you might have about what it is. Thank you for responses
  7. It's definitely not a meteorite. Chip off a small piece and use a hammer to reduce it to a powder. Smear a little bit on a piece of white paper with your finger. . Let us know what color it is.
  8. It is 99% identical as the rock in this video. Let me know what you think thank you. I don't see a reason why my friend would lie to me, the way it appeared it could have come only from above. Thank you for your responses. https://youtu.be/OI9PWViGAXQ
  9. Looks like a sulphide of some type.
  10. like new...great for cleaning bedrock cracks..tool only..no battery...local only $40
  11. Fredmason, Actually, I write these off in a flash because I feel passionate about it. My exception is the oft repeated standard explanation of meteorite characteristics for the newbies. billpeters
  12. Popac, Why didn't you mention he was an older person who lived on top of a hill? That changes everything! You definitely have a Martian Meteorite because they only fall on hilltops where older fellows live. We can identify rocks and meteorites pretty good around here. We suck at changing opinions that have been formed on assumptions that are incorrect. Most of the time it is much easier to identify the specimen as a terrestrial mineral or rock rather than prove it is a meteorite. You said, " I don't see what else could it be" but I can think of several minerals it could be. Schist or galena (or some other polymetallic sulphide) comes to mind. Schorl, peridotite/olivinite, and several minerals that form in pegmatites could look exactly like your photos. If we drop the assumptions it is a Martian meteorite based on not knowing what else it could be we could identify this common terrestrial material! Why don't we identify the specimen based on scientific observation? Let's look at hardness, density, streak and texture and determine what it is!
  13. BillPeters, do you have these pre-written, or do you snap these off in a flash... excellent explanation! nice resume too fred
  14. Yep That's him. thanks for the spelling correction on his name Au Seeker. We went down to Mexico hunting together and I would run into him in Nevada and all over Az. too. AzNuggetBob
  15. Looks as real as they get. I agree it is malachite, is that what the question is ?
  16. I maybe mistaken but I think Preston's last name is spelled "Vickery", but this could be another Preston Vickery, Preston has been mentioned a few times over the years on this forum, here's a link to a article about Preston and him finding pocket gold. http://www.goldgold.com/pocket-hunting-for-gold.html Is this the same Preston you referring too Bob?
  17. There was no light or anything as far as he can tell, he lives on top of a hill in a low populated area. He just came home one day and found it in the backyard, he is on older person and a family friend, about 10y ago or less, there was no crater just a hole not rather big. The rock was the size of few of these in the photos combined. I don't see what else could it be, i will try to calculate density.
  18. Flight Characteristics of Meteorites, Most people who find an unusual rock they think is a meteorite typically think it is from Mars or the Moon and worth tens of millions of dollars. There is always a fall story, usually embellished with seeing it fall from the sky with a blinding light right near them and going out and finding a new rock often burning hot or too hot to touch at the bottom of a crater. It's wishful thinking. It is not what happens when a rock falls from space. Meteorites do not make holes, they don't burn, they don't light up from friction, and you won't see one shooting trail across the sky going all the way to the ground near you. Meteorites do not make holes. They land at the same speed as if you had dropped the same sized rock for a Cessna airplane. Each rock or meteorite would slow to it's terminal velocity based on air resistance. A bowling ball, or your rock, would slow to about 200 MPH. When it hit the ground it might break, or dent asphalt, but it would not make a crater. The terminal velocity of smaller stones is even lower. Galileo be damned. It would take a single stone the size of an eight passenger van to maintain enough velocity to make a crater as had occurred in Carancas, Peru, 27 Sep 2007. Meteorites come in at hypersonic 25,000 to 40,000 MPH velocities. At just below 60 miles high the air compacts at the front of the rock by ram pressure. The air itself becomes charged and fluorescences in brilliant light immediately expanding outward from the incoming meteor along its streak, which is actually what everyone sees when they see a meteor shoot across the sky. Think about it. The typical meteor is the size of a grain of rice. You can't see that 60 miles up. I don't care how bright it is. I repeat. What you are actually seeing is the instantaneously fluorescent atmosphere created by ram pressure along the meteor's path and not the actual rock. That same ram pressure heats up the outer surface and ablates (shatters) the meteor. Most are disintegrated and go off at about to 40 miles high. The very rare bollide that could produce a strewnfield of stones on the ground will go dark at about 35 to 25 miles high. All meteors will go dark after they drop below about 4500 MPH as they will no longer be enough pressure to produce light. Dark flight begins in the lower atmosphere as the meteorites continue to decelerate, but now producing sonic booms. They drop subsonic below 40 to 25 miles high. The trail of stones will become quite long with larger ones traveling farther that smaller fragments. When they reach terminal velocity for that sized stone they will lose nearly all of their forward momentum and drop nearly straight down being buffeted by the jet stream and atmospheric winds. The interior temperature of meteoriods in space is about -250 F. In the lower atmosphere the just-heated outer surface of incoming meteorites are blasted and chilled by the -60F of ever thickening air. Just fallen meteorites are usually warm to the touch, but not too hot to touch. Sometimes larger ones are icy cold as the interior re-chills the surface. The cannot start fires, in spite of the promulgated dubious Wisconsin-Chicago fire theory. (You should read my tutorial, "How to make a landing site for a meteorite." 31 Jan 31 2019.) Fresh meteorite falls are found on top of the ground by eyesight or by a magnet stick. Old falls containing larger stones or irons are buried much deeper and are often found by metal detectors. The reason that older fall meteorites are buried is normally not because they made a crater that deep, but that being much denser than the surrounding soil and boulders they sink slowly due to settling over the centuries. (See the depth of the Civil War bullets in my "Not Everything that Pings is a Meteorite" article 18 Dec 2018.) Cheers! billpeters
  19. Popac, Most people who find an unusual rock they think is a meteorite typically think it is from Mars or the Moon and worth tens of millions of dollars. There is always a fall story, usually embellished with seeing it fall from the sky with a blinding light right near them and going out and finding a new rock often burning hot or too hot to had touch at the bottom of a crater. It's wishful thinking. It is not what happens when a rock falls from space. Meteorites do not make holes, they don't burn, they don't light up from friction, and you won't see one shooting trail across the sky going all the way to the ground near you. Meteorites do not make holes. They land at the same speed as if you had dropped the same sized rock for a Cessna airplane. Each rock or meteorite would slow to it's terminal velocity based on air resistance. A bowling ball, or your rock, would slow to about 200 MPH. When it hit the ground it might break, or dent asphalt, but it would not make a crater. The terminal velocity of smaller stones is even lower. Galileo be damned. It would take a single stone the size of an eight passenger van to maintain enough velocity to make a crater as had occurred in Carancas, Peru, 27 Sep 2007. Meteorites come in at hypersonic 25,000 to 40,000 MPH velocities. At just below 60 miles high the air compacts at the front of the rock by ram pressure. The air itself becomes charged and fluorescences in brilliant light immediately expanding outward from the incoming meteor along its streak, which is actually what everyone sees when they see a meteor shoot across the sky. Think about it. The typical meteor is the size of a grain of rice. You can't see that 60 miles up. I don't care how bright it is. I repeat. What you are actually seeing is the instantaneously fluorescent atmosphere created by ram pressure along the meteor's path and not the actual rock. That same ram pressure heats up the outer surface and ablates (shatters) the meteor. Most are disintegrated and go off at about to 40 miles high. The very rare bollide that could produce a strewnfield of stones on the ground will go dark at about 35 to 25 miles high. All meteors will go dark after they drop below about 4500 MPH as they will no longer be enough pressure to produce light. Dark flight begins in the lower atmosphere as the meteorites continue to decelerate, but now producing sonic booms. They drop subsonic below 40 to 25 miles high. The trail of stones will become quite long with larger ones traveling farther that smaller fragments. When they reach terminal velocity for that sized stone they will lose nearly all of their forward momentum and drop nearly straight down being buffeted by the jet stream and atmospheric winds. The interior temperature of meteoriods in space is about -250 F. In the lower atmosphere the just-heated outer surface of incoming meteorites are blasted and chilled by the -60F of ever thickening air. Just fallen meteorites are usually warm to the touch, but not too hot to touch. Sometimes larger ones are icy cold as the interior re-chills the surface. The cannot start fires, in spite of the promulgated dubious Wisconsin-Chicago fire theory. (You should read my tutorial, "How to make a landing site for a meteorite." 31 Jan 31 2019.) Fresh meteorite falls are found on top of the ground by eyesight or by a magnet stick. Old falls containing larger stones or irons are buried much deeper and are often found by metal detectors. The reason that older fall meteorites are buried is normally not because they made a crater that deep, but that being much denser than the surrounding soil and boulders they sink slowly due to settling over the centuries. (See the depth of the Civil War bullets in my "Not Everything that Pings is a Meteorite" article 18 Dec 2018.) Cheers! billpeters
  20. Let me preface this by first saying do not take my opinion as gospel, primarily because I’m uncomfortable giving it based on photos alone. I’d be more comfortable if I could see it in person. I think this is real. It’s a copper mineral called malachite. It’s deposited slowly over time. A piece like this has a uniform color on the surface when found in nature. Specimens like are ground fairly smooth and then polished. This exposes the different layers giving it the concentric rings. This is something they do to specimens that are too thin or uneven to cut into slabs.
  21. Lanny his real name as far as I know is Preston Vicory. I think that's how you spell it. I'm not sure what pen name he is using. but I do remember sitting around the campfire reading his stories. he also hunted all over the west and was very good at finding gold and writing about it. AzNuggetBob
  22. Hello, it’s been awhile since my last posting. I kinda figure that y’all got tired of viewing my collection. A friend gave this to me. I think that it’s is real at first glance I thought it was man made. I appreciate any thoughts you have on this. Roxyann gem and mineral show 4-6 4-7 at the Jackson County expo center can’t wait. If in the area it’s a good event. Thank you for any replies
  23. Thanks for your wonderful comments on my stories Bob, truly appreciated. What is Preston's last name, or his first name (if that's his last name?); I'd like to read some of his stories, can't ever get enough stories about chasing the gold! Once again, thanks for your generous comments, and for all of the input and advice you've given me; I'm honoured by your kindness, and all the best as always, Lanny
  24. Hey Bob, thanks for your comments, i get what you mean about the piece splitting off of a larger stone seems to make sense. I still am leaning towards cave man's fire stick, but i know your opinion is a good one. I am pretty sure there is no opal in this wood, it is fully agatized. I think your right though that it could have split off a bigger stone. Thanks for sharing your ideas on turning some fossil wood into product for market. I am at the stage of gathering and hope to tool up this summer, so i am just getting started in some ways. h.t.
  25. Lanny the reason I made reference to Preston is that your writing style reminds me a lot of his writing style. Preston and I used to hunt together years ago.he would write some great stories while we were doing some of those mind-numbingly long drives from one gold area to another. From what I've heard he went up north to prospect and writes books on poetry and stories in some of the prospecting/treasure hunting magazines these days. Anyway keep the great stories and photo's coming. AzNuggetBob
  26. Happy birthday Johnno. Hope you have a good day.
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