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Bedrock Bob

"Clay talks about fires and stuff"!!!

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41 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

Is that a half VW or a full one?:)

It is a hoot. It rides and handles better than any Jeep I can afford. The open cockpit is fun in nasty weather, but it has all four cylinders. :4chsmu1:

 

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1 hour ago, ArcticDave said:

It is a hoot. It rides and handles better than any Jeep I can afford. The open cockpit is fun in nasty weather, but it has all four cylinders. :4chsmu1:

 

891345-R1-014-5A.jpg

This one has six. And 650,000 miles on it. A 1976 FJ 40 Toyota. I have had it 32 years now and I am still driving it across the Mogollon ridge and pulling my little boat over the Black Range.

I hear you about nasty weather. I wrote the book on driving and shivering in this thing. I know it gets cold in Alaska but New Mexico can really freeze your pickles with this altitude. I have a bikini on it now. That top finally disintegrated

I am pushing 34 inches of sturdy, new snow at a little uphill incline...not much. Heavy chains with teeth on all fours. It is about 20 degrees. All stock 2F engine rated at 130 h.p. at 7600 feet. I could pretty much chug right along through it. Any more incline or any deeper snow and I would have had to run at it and keep taking bites of it between lugging. 

The sweet thing about that VW is you fly over the stuff rather than chug through it. I think they are pretty sweet. I have never driven one but it always looked like a fun ride as long as you kept that momentum up and dealt with things on the fly. 

And if it breaks down you can saw it in half, make two airplanes out of it and fly out of there!

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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Bob,

I was catching up on probably the greatest thread I have seen in a long time, (even with an ever changing name) and noticed you mentioned Reserve.  Reserve NM I presume.  If that is the Reserve you are speaking of I had the good fortune of visiting there a couple of years ago to pick up a diesel powered Samurai from a very interesting wrench bender there....  My friend and I walked into the small cafe for breakfast and we were both amazed at the warm and friendly greetings we received from the locals....  A woman came by our table and filled up our coffee cups and when as we left I saw her outside and thanked her again, turns out she was not an employee but just a local being a kind soul....  The country is breathtakingly beautiful and the people we talked to were great.....  I gotta go pop some more popcorn so I can continue the top notch banter here.  

Jeff

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7 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

891345-R1-014-5A.jpg

This one has six. And 650,000 miles on it. A 1976 FJ 40 Toyota. I have had it 32 years now and I am still driving it across the Mogollon ridge and pulling my little boat over the Black Range.

I hear you about nasty weather. I wrote the book on driving and shivering in this thing. I know it gets cold in Alaska but New Mexico can really freeze your pickles with this altitude. I have a bikini on it now. That top finally disintegrated

I am pushing 34 inches of sturdy, new snow at a little uphill incline...not much. Heavy chains with teeth on all fours. It is about 20 degrees. All stock 2F engine rated at 130 h.p. at 7600 feet. I could pretty much chug right along through it. Any more incline or any deeper snow and I would have had to run at it and keep taking bites of it between lugging. 

The sweet thing about that VW is you fly over the stuff rather than chug through it. I think they are pretty sweet. I have never driven one but it always looked like a fun ride as long as you kept that momentum up and dealt with things on the fly. 

And if it breaks down you can saw it in half, make two airplanes out of it and fly out of there!

I've always liked those older Cruisers. :thumbsupanim

Use the right tool for the job. The veedub would be parked under a tarp till all that white stuff disappeared! 

I sacrificed the last Jeep I built to help pay for the airplane project. It was a great Jeep, but it was overkill for 99% of the off roading here. I decided flying was more important. :)

I will build another 4x4 from scratch one day... maybe when Bam comes to Arizona and kicks me in the family jewels. :brows:

 

20160228_151958.jpg

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8 hours ago, pairadiceau said:

Bob,

I was catching up on probably the greatest thread I have seen in a long time, (even with an ever changing name) and noticed you mentioned Reserve.  Reserve NM I presume.  If that is the Reserve you are speaking of I had the good fortune of visiting there a couple of years ago to pick up a diesel powered Samurai from a very interesting wrench bender there....  My friend and I walked into the small cafe for breakfast and we were both amazed at the warm and friendly greetings we received from the locals....  A woman came by our table and filled up our coffee cups and when as we left I saw her outside and thanked her again, turns out she was not an employee but just a local being a kind soul....  The country is breathtakingly beautiful and the people we talked to were great.....  I gotta go pop some more popcorn so I can continue the top notch banter here.  

Jeff

Hey Jeff, thanks for dropping by, and HAPPYFREAKINGBIRTHDAY too!

Reserve is a neat little place. It is a favorite stop in my travels for sure.

New Mexicans are known for small town hospitality. We are kinda like Texans but a lot browner. Most towns here are tiny and spread way apart. We get all excited when we have a chance to meet new folks. And there is a custom here - mi casa tu casa. It came all the way from the middle east centuries ago (with a lot of other customs we still keep) and it is our rule. Guests get fed and treated like family.  So you can pretty much expect extreme politeness from a native New Mexican. Most newcomers fall in line with that too.

...Oh. And chile.  We will get to chile when there is more time to elaborate.

Have a great day Jeff!

 

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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Here is a song from a local fellow explaining mi casa tu casa and how we feel about it.

 

 

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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It is a shame that kind of hospitality is disappearing. It was very common in south Alabama, where my family originates, and Alaska.

In Alaska it was a survival issue. Travel in the old days was arduous, and the next cabin down the line may provide the shelter and warmth needed to live until tomorrow. I bet it was the same way in the desert for similar reasons, just the opposite climate.

Neighbors taking care of each other! What a novel concept...I like it. :)

Speaking of chile...

The local grocery store just got in a pallet of some fresh Hatch goods. I filled up a bag and brought them home. I think tomorrow I will fire up the grill and give them a good roasting. Some chile and pig with tortillas sounds divine! :droolin:

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54 minutes ago, ArcticDave said:

It is a shame that kind of hospitality is disappearing. It was very common in south Alabama, where my family originates, and Alaska.

In Alaska it was a survival issue. Travel in the old days was arduous, and the next cabin down the line may provide the shelter and warmth needed to live until tomorrow. I bet it was the same way in the desert for similar reasons, just the opposite climate.

Neighbors taking care of each other! What a novel concept...I like it. :)

Speaking of chile...

The local grocery store just got in a pallet of some fresh Hatch goods. I filled up a bag and brought them home. I think tomorrow I will fire up the grill and give them a good roasting. Some chile and pig with tortillas sounds divine! :droolin:

You hit the nail on the head Dave... Survival.  It is all about survival in a lawless land with limited resources.

We are polite but tribal. We treat outsiders well but we always recognize them as outsiders. And the old saying "A well armed society is a polite society" is an experiment we live every day. You can seriously get shot here. Everyone is packing and knows just where the line is.

People learn how to smile and get along as a matter of survival. We treat visitors with respect and fatten them up with Mexican food really good. But karma is swift in the high desert. Every bush has thorns, every critter will bite a chunk out of you and every fellow out there is pretty good with a weapon. There are a whole lot of tough rascals here that thin the herd pretty well when it comes to a$$hol3s. And a whole lot of territory with no law for miles in any direction. So while it is super enchanting it ain't Disneyland for sure.

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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5 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

Here is a song from a local fellow explaining mi casa tu casa and how we feel about it ... You can seriously get shot here.

Quite an art of juxtapositionizing you have there, Mr. Bedrock.

You never know what kind of oddball characters will crawl out of the rocks when you offer such hospitality.  I do believe I'm going to stop and buy you a cup of coffee (or tea, or tequila, or grasshopper juice -- whatever it is that you New Mexicans drink) on my way through New Mexico to Arizona, likely in mid November if the current POO holds up.  Don't shoot at the scrawny old bearded Semite dragging a converted horse trailer containing his meager pile of worldly goods -- I've had enough holes poked in me already for one lifetime.  I can't eat your Mexican food, but I'll enjoy smelling it nevertheless.  Speaking of noses, you'll know it's me because the schnoz will show up about two minutes before the rest of me.

 

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27 minutes ago, Saul R W said:

Quite an art of juxtapositionizing you have there, Mr. Bedrock.

You never know what kind of oddball characters will crawl out of the rocks when you offer such hospitality.  I do believe I'm going to stop and buy you a cup of coffee (or tea, or tequila, or grasshopper juice -- whatever it is that you New Mexicans drink) on my way through New Mexico to Arizona, likely in mid November if the current POO holds up.  Don't shoot at the scrawny old bearded Semite dragging a converted horse trailer containing his meager pile of worldly goods -- I've had enough holes poked in me already for one lifetime.  I can't eat your Mexican food, but I'll enjoy smelling it nevertheless.  Speaking of noses, you'll know it's me because the schnoz will show up about two minutes before the rest of me.

 

Much of the Spanish blood that colonized New Mexico was Jewish believe it or not. And we have a whole bunch of customs unique to New Mexico that are distinctly North African/Middle eastern.

There has been a lot of discussion lately about the Spanish setters, who the were and why they came to the New World. Most folks think of the conquest period when they think of Spanish influence. But that was just the first few short years. The settlement period was not about conquest at all and lasted until the United States purchased this land from Mexico. Most of the settlers that came here were "Crypto Jews" that were trying to survive the inquisition. So the Jewish influence runs really deep in our history. Most Hispanics in New Mexico came from Jewish roots.

https://www.geni.com/projects/Sephardic-and-Crypto-Jews-of-New-Mexico/18121

I bet we can figure out a kosher taco bro.

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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Yes, I'm very aware of the crypto-Jews in NM and elsewhere around the world.  They were among the many thousands who found ways to survive Spain's expulsion and the Inquisitions (which were implemented specifically for our benefit).  I have friends in NM whose families have returned to open practice of Judaism after more than 500 years of keeping identity and rituals and beliefs in the closet, who never entirely lost touch with who they were, some indication of our genetic muleheadedness.  One of them is a co-conspirator of mine on a multi-decades, multi-national scholarly project that shall remain unnamed here because mention of it would cause this place to be flooded with nutcases wishing to argue subjects entirely unrelated to mining, and Bill would suffer headaches.  Also, there would be eggs thrown.

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Si, great guitar and lyrics.  Thank you for sharing it....  Kosher tacos.....  and the strange jux toe positrons just keep rolling in.

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1 hour ago, Bedrock Bob said:

So! Kosher tacos it is! 

taco-dog-La-Mex-Alaska.jpg

 

Can't argue with a puppy pic.  Puppies are unimpeachable.

Sho nuff, kosher tacos and grasshopper juice it shall be.  Twenty years ago I'd have suggested silver tequila, the 100% agave juice variety, which is also kosher, but my Scotch-Irish doc tells me imbibation will prompt my liver to take the first off ramp at the next available orifice, and my toes to web themselves, so it'll have to be NM bug juice instead.

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