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Idaho Jim

New video of my Sweep Jig....

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Went down along the Utah border last weekend. Visited an old gold/silver mine looking for pyrite nuggets. Ran the Sweep Jig (patent pending) dry to see if it could recover the pyrite. Obviously, it did OK.

I'm wondering about the "coppery" color. If anybody knows what that is, I'd appreciate the info. The GMT doesn't detect the nuggets, but easily "sees" the coppery sand.

https://youtu.be/UDATYX62tt4

Jim

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My guess is it wasn't pyrite you were finding that is coppery looking. It was chalcopyrite which is copper iron sulphide. Just my thoughts.

Certainly an interesting looking piece of equipment you were using. I never seen one like that before.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Morlock said:

My guess is it wasn't pyrite you were finding that is coppery looking. It was chalcopyrite which is copper iron sulphide. Just my thoughts.

Certainly an interesting looking piece of equipment you were using. I never seen one like that before.

AAhhh, that's what it is. I wondered about the copper color. Many thanks!  BLM's records show no mention of copper at that mine. That's really interesting. The sweep jig is something I developed late last summer, and through the winter. It is the absolute nuts! Works wet or dry, and recovers a very high percentage of flour gold. I applied for a patent in January. We'll see how it goes. It allows me to prospect places I'd passed by before. I've sold two of them...one to a guy in Edmonton who is using it on the NSR, and one last week to a guy in Arizona. He's got an old mine tailing pile, with gold, but no water. I'm looking forward to his reports. He also plans on taking it to the beach in Oregon next month.

Here's a pic of another rock I found a few years ago about a mile from the mine. It also has a coppery sheen, and feels waxy. I thought it might be a mica schist, but now you've got me wondering. These rocks are only found in a small area of maybe an acre. really strange. Some of them are as big as a bathtub. A detector does not see them.

 

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Edited by Idaho Jim
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I've reached the end of the internet with this.  You seem to be the only one with anything on sweep jigs on google.  Good luck on the patent; it does seem to be a new piece of gear.  I like the fact of not classifying on it.

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That's quite a contraption.  I like your concept, and like Morlock, I've never seen one like it.  That bushing, though ...   (Where's the grease-gun smiley?)

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Many thanks, guys! I hate greasing these bushings...it just collects dust, but I'm making an exception in this case...LOL. Actually, I need to either go back to the UHMW plastic bushings, or try the HDPE. obviously, the Delrin against aluminum isn't going to work...LOL

Jim

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Could that be graphite on the surface in your pan?

 

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Posted (edited)

I have no idea, Jack. The tailings are all a dark gray color. The geo report said the mine had limonite, shale, metasedimentary quartzite, etc. Whatever it is has a really oily look to it, and the material I dumped out of the tubs last night has a very black, shiny appearance this morning. I know it's hard to get off my hands....really gets into the pores of the skin. I'm assuming the dark gray material was the shale. I find it a little strange that ALL the tailings are the same dark gray material....very little other gravel, like quartz, etc. I know the belt of material it comes from is a metasedimentary quartzite. That belt extends about 6 or 7 miles into Idaho, and is about 1 mile wide. Lots of quartzite intrusions in the belt. Lots of prospecting of the belt, but not much to show for it, at least in Idaho.

Jim

Edited by Idaho Jim

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Perhaps you found a new fracking site for oil.  Some of it is stored in shale.

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I've worked slate here in California that had the same situation as a section of the ledge responded to my Gold Bug. I've read / heard about graphite enrichment zones in slate. Heavily populated with pyrites as well.

 

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Posted (edited)

Yup...I'm starting to believe there's graphite in this stuff. The sand is definitely conductive, but not at all magnetic. None, zero, nada response to a magnet. That means it's conductive, without iron, and it's probable the conductive element is graphite. I retried the GMT on it, and it detects both the nuggets and the dried sand. But, the GMT indicates the probability of iron at 70%. But that just means the phase shift is close to the iron range. Doesn't mean definite proof the material has a high iron content. Another thing arguing in favor of graphite is the streak test....almost black, and it glides across the surface as easily as a pencil. So, probably the black in the sand is graphite, and the coppery color is some sort of pyrite....judging by the color maybe chalcopyrite.

 What I'm the happiest about, however, is how well the Sweep Jig recovered those fines while running dry. If there was free gold there, it would have recovered it. That's what the trip was all about. That, and the recovery of some nice pyrite specimens. I'm sure I'll go back, but I'm taking the chainsaw next time...LOL

Jim

Edited by Idaho Jim

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May put some of that oily stuff on the bushing???  :idea:  Then I might take a propane torch and see if it burns???  That "sweep jig" is interesting...have you ever tried it in a known "free gold" spot?

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LOL...there's a thought! Yes, this has been used at Bonanza bar on the Snake River to recover flour. Video here:Sweep Jig at Bonanza Bar

The biggest gold on the Snake is about 50 mesh, and not much of that. Most is sub-100 and smaller.

I also ran it at the LDMA/GPAA outing at the Blue Bucket in May. Actually recovered black sand and gold from damp tailings without water. Using water, in a demo, recovered 100% of black sand and gold in front of several miners. Asked to re-run the tails and found zero black sand or gold.

Jim

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Nice Jim, I like the whole concept of your Sweep Jig.

AzNuggetBob

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Thanks, Bob. The actual concept occurred to me last August, but I'd been working on dry gem recovery for about 8 years, building 8 or 10 different designs. As it turns out, you can't recover gems dry. A physics phenomenon called "Granular Convection" aka "the Brazil Nut Effect, prevents it. So I built this for that purpose (not being aware of GC), and when it didn't work for gems I tried it for gold, and it worked great. A few bugs to work out, and it's now a pretty nice little wet/dry gold machine that can be built in almost any size. I sell the 18" unit for $550 + shipping, with a solid body of HDPE corrugated pipe. That model weighs 19lbs. The one I use myself is a skeletonized version that sells for $650 + shipping. It only weighs 11lbs. I'm amazed myself at how well these perform.

 They only draw about 1 amp, so can get by with a fairly small battery pack, and when used wet, they require very little water...just enough to keep the material on the diaphragm sort of soupy. Water has no impact on the recovery...that's all in the mechanical action.

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Good job, keep inventing. But if you don't oil that bushing you could find yourself surrounded by angry elk in rut.

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Posted (edited)

LOL...my poor hearing is a blessing at times, but I had no trouble hearing that squeak. tried to get rid of it as best I could in the viodeo, but I guess from what I'm hearing from everybody, I failed....Ha. Maybe I should be marketing an elk bugle.

Jim

Edited by Idaho Jim
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Same here, Jim -- my hearing isn't quite what it used to be.  But there are certain high-frequency sounds that seem to pierce the deafness, including bad bearings, slipping belts and angry daughters. 

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Ya know, Saul, I've noticed that "selective" hearing isn't all it's cracked up to be...LOL In my case it seems to select what I don't want to hear instead of the other way around.

Jim

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