Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums

Recommended Posts

Looking for some advice on a good hand-held GPS device. Hopefully, one that is fairly easy to use. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey there, watermain.  Welcome to the forum.  This subject has been covered many times and you can find some of the discussions using the search box (top right).  Try this link for one.  Hope it helps.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you looking for a lot of features? Or just basic?
Tom H.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Garmin etrex or if you have a android phone download a app called ATAK. With atak you can have both topo maps and satellite imagery displayed on your phone with some robust mapping features. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd have to agree with these guys, Garman Etrex !
I'm on my 3rd one I believe , I lost count.:inocent:
Yes I believe its the 3rd one I've owned.  My main problem is I never graduated from "MAPS"
I love maps !  WHY ?  Cause all I gotta do is "unfold" one and I can read it !:reading:
Even thou I have my 3rd GPS, I still haven't gotten past …. :sickbyc:  pressing the ON/OFF button.
Truly it is "on" my Bucket List !  :vomit-smiley-011[1]:Learning how to "use" a G.P.S.:snapoutofit:
Seriously,

If any of you have some Super Quick Learning Tips, be sure to share with the rest of us !


 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Get a Garmin . This topic should be moved

Edited by adam
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Common Frank;

If I can use an etrex I am certain you can...just practice at home before you go hunting again!

fred

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frank C., thanks.  I have the same problem, I can read a map fine, but struggle with electronics. I have an Etrex 30, but can't figure out how to load GPS coordinates into it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something not often considered when this subject comes up is how the GPS is going to be used. If you are like me you will want to be able to operate the GPS with one hand while on the move with equipment. That pretty much limits me to the eTrex style handsets. Phones and the newer large screen GPS unit designs require two hands to operate.

Another thing to consider is the new style units with larger screens, cameras, phone, touchscreen, wireless, bluetooth etc. use a lot more battery power. Most of the larger screen GPS/Phones won't last more than a day before they have to be recharged or have the batteries replaced. My eTrex lasts about 2-3 days on a set of fresh batteries and replacement of dead batteries is a two minute job instead of several hours tied to a power source (not all GPS can use off the shelf batteries). The eTrex stays in the field as long as you have fresh batteries. Very useful if you tend towards multi day expeditions.

The eTrex has a great bright backlit and reflective screen (transflective) for reading in bright light. Larger GPS/Phone screens can't use that technology but they are getting better. Pay close attention to the screen technology. A GPS screen that looks great in the store but you can't read in sunlight isn't very functional in the field.

After all else is considered get a Garmin no matter which model appeals to you. Garmin is the only brand that doesn't play the propriety file format game. This leaves you free to download your stored GPS data into other applications or GPS units no matter how old the data is. Garmin tend to make a better, more reliable, unit with some notable exceptions. I have two eTrex units that are more than 10 years old and working as well as new.

I used to own and test quite a few GPS units. It's been a few years since I've tested new units so things may have changed but I found the two most expensive brands actually performed poorly, compared to my garmin units, in actual locational and tracking accuracy. A high price tag probably won't buy you a better unit, they all pretty much use the same GPS chip so antenna, case design and software have more influence on locational precision and accuracy than internal hardware does.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only use a GPS to mark where I have been. That is basically the only thing that a GPS can do for me that a map can't do better. And the maps on the little screens are a poor substitute for a paper map. I use a very basic Garmin Etrex to mark waypoints and determine a route back to those waypoints. It is worthless for navigation to a point not stored in the memory. I use a set of maps and overlays to plan trips and then have the paper maps and a compass to navigate. I generally don't use the GPS at all until I am approaching the vehicle. A GPS is just super for marking spots when detecting. Any of them will do that and they all do it well. They generally suck for navigation across terrain though. Fancier GPS units may have features that appeal to the owner but very few of these features are of real value to most outdoorsmen. You can get a topo and a trail map for nothing and have a much better navigation tool than the same maps loaded on a GPS. Another plus is that compasses are easy on batteries. Guys that have learned their machine and have a basic understanding of navigation can always benefit from the information a GPS provides. But too many times I have seen guys try to navigate while watching the screen on the GPS and become completely disoriented. Walking with your head up, watching landmarks and following contour lines is the way to travel. I suppose the point I am trying to make is that a GPS is great for marking points where you have been but crappy for finding a route through new territory over a distance. So a very basic GPS will get a prospector 94% of what they need. The very best will only get you 1% more. And even the very best wont do the job of a map and compass over a multi-mile trip.

  • Like 5
  • Hmmmmmm 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a former orienteering instructor I would not teach a class or a student for that matter that didn't have a paper map and compass for the journey we were about to take. Basic compass work MUST be understood before using a GPS. One with a GPS only can not travel near as far or as fast as one with a compass and map! If one could travel in a straight line from point A to point B without variation a GPS is OK as a single tool. However ... swamps, cliffs, trees, canyons etc prevent long treks in an absolute line. A map and compass is the proper tool to effectively traverse the universe. As has already been stated a GPS can mark well where we were and get us back via the same path via bread crumbs on the screen but how often do we travel the same path? Don't get me wrong a GPS is a great tool to get you back to the start point. Many times hunting in the deer woods of northern Maine or prospecting a new area in the gold fields with no particular destination in mind I have marked the location of the truck or my RZR, turned the GPS off, gone about my wandering and when ready to return turn it back on and have a general direction back to the truck. Just remember that the GPS does not calculate up/down hill or side to side movement ... it measures strait lines. So if the GPS says it is 2 miles back to the truck it might actually be as much as 3 miles of walking uphill downhill right and left around obstructions. It is merely a tool in combination with a map and compass!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×