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ArcticDave

Bacon wood knife scales

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The ironwood looks great Bob! To be honest though...that filing along the spine to make that flame effect takes the cake :worship:

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Posted (edited)

Thanks Dave. the file work goes all the way around the tapered tang. File work is not something that is really functional. as I understand it, it dates back years ago as something the old forgers/black smiths did to sort of trade mark their blades. file work and inlays dates clear back to bronze age and has been found on many old knives and swords. there are many different patterns. another cool one is that dagger they found in and king tut's tomb. it was forged from a meteorite. love the gold handle and sheath too.

 

hith-king-tut-dagger-The-iron-dagger-picture-1-resized-E.jpeg


AzNuggetBob

Edited by AzNuggetBob
clean up the spelling LOL

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Something else. It looks to me like it had a guard at one time. one can only wonder what it was made of or why it didn't survive?

AzNuggetBob

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12 minutes ago, AzNuggetBob said:

Thanks Dave. the file work goes all the way around the tappered tang. File work is not something that is realy funtional. as I understand it,it dates back years ago as something the old forgers/black smiths did to sort of trade mark their blades. file work and inlays dates clear back to bronze age and has been found on many old knives and swords. there are many different patterns. another cool one is that dagger they found in and king tut's tomb. it was forged from a meteorite. love the gold handle and sheath too.

 

hith-king-tut-dagger-The-iron-dagger-picture-1-resized-E.jpeg


AzNuggetBob

I think the file work adds a nice touch.  Especially with those  brass sheets in there framing the design. Just very well done :thumbsupanim

The gold work on the Tut knife is :WOW:amazing!

I was talking to a friend the other day and I had mentioned I was ready to step it up and start forging my own steel. He told me after I had some practice he wants a meteorite blade. He has a 300 gram nickel iron that he really wants turned into something a special. The King Tut knife was one of the examples I found while researching. There are a few more, and some new stuff from modern craftsman as well.

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7 minutes ago, AzNuggetBob said:

Something else. It looks to me like it had a guard at one time. one can only wonder what it was made of or why it didn't survive?

AzNuggetBob

Glass maybe? That finial on the end looks like glass to me. Could explain why it is completely missing.

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Posted (edited)

I'm thinking quartz, and may have gotten dropped and broken off.? those hard stone floors suck. :D

AzNuggetBob

Edited by AzNuggetBob
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The Egyptians were skilled in glass art. That may be quartz on the pommel, but it really looks like glass to me. I found this on an Egypt history website....

"For the Ancient Egyptians glass was regarded as an artificial semi-precious stone and was a costly novelty material, most likely under the control of the royalty and given as presents to the favoured officials. "

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Dave I thought about making my own steel. it takes a lot of equipment. I just buy pre-made damascus bar stock. you can find it in a lot of different types even nickel/hi carbon steel. with a lot of different roll patterns.

AzNuggetBob

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It doesn't take too much, but it is a big investment in time just to make a few knives. It is just a personal itch that has to be scratched. :)

I have eveything I need minus the forge itself, and I have most of the parts gathered for that. I still need to find and buy some fire clay.

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Posted (edited)

Dave Here is some other things Im working on. I know its not a knife but it will give you an idea of some of the things Im working on, when Im not mining. I hate to showing them before their done as you have no idea where Im going with them until their done. stay tuned. Its hand carved soap stone ends with road kill skin. I think its going to blow your mind where Im going with this peace pipe. :) here is just a few quick photo's. Ive got another peace pipe tomahawk Im working on too.

AzNuggetBob

new snake 003.JPG

new snake 002.JPG

 

rattle 001.JPG

Edited by AzNuggetBob
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Posted (edited)

Ok Dave I'll get back to edged weapons. here is the tomahawk Im working on. this is a brass steel forge with a pipe bowl. the wood is walnut. the black pen marks are layout marks for brass or wood hand file work and tacks. like I said before Its going to look a lot different when its done.

 

tama 001.JPG

AzNuggetBob

Edited by AzNuggetBob
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I would definitely like to see more of those when they are finished! Looks fantastic so far :thumbsupanim

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I hadn't thought of using redwood before, it looks great.

So far I've used antler, ironwood and oak in handles. All my knives so far have been forged from 5160 or 1095.

IMG_20170716_092012852.jpgIMG_20171211_141625598.jpgIMG_20171019_130318055.jpgIMG_20170619_115215262.jpgIMG_20170620_083148154_HDR.jpg

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Looks good! I really dig the old forge :worship:

Do you use charcoal or coal?

I like 1095, but I have heard 5160 makes a dang good blade as well. That is a good thing because I have lots of 5160 to practice with!

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1 hour ago, ArcticDave said:

Looks good! I really dig the old forge :worship:

Do you use charcoal or coal?

I like 1095, but I have heard 5160 makes a dang good blade as well. That is a good thing because I have lots of 5160 to practice with!

I made the forge out of a chimanea, brake rotor and oil field pipe. Blower is a hair blower from Goodwill.

 

I like to start the fire with charcoal, ad coal and eventually coke.

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I agree Dave very nice forge. I like the #1 knife too. I also like the way you re-purpose things too, way to go Edge. :thumbsupanim

AzNuggetBob

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12 hours ago, AzNuggetBob said:

I agree Dave very nice forge. I like the #1 knife too. I also like the way you re-purpose things too, way to go Edge. :thumbsupanim

AzNuggetBob

Thanks

Yeah I've kept my eye out for useful items. Ive made nice forges out of lawnmowers too. While on my desert walks I've collected dead ironwood limbs for making charcoal.

I've yet to keep a knife I've made myself but that's about to change. I'm making a Damascus blade from some steel items I found when I cleaned out my dad's shop. I'm using a an antler from our first hunt together for a handle. I have brass for a guard from one of his belt buckles. And some of dad's ashes are going into the forge too. 

I'll post pics when I'm finished. Thought it would be a fitting tribute to the man whom shared his passion for the outdoors with me.

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I know I want to see the knife when its done. Please do share :)

Where do you get the coal?

I haven't decided on what forge to build yet. I like the idea of a traditional fired forge, but I have natural gas service and I've read that folks are making the low pressure from NG work by using homemade ribbon burners and a small blower. I might build a ribbon burner and experiment with it when some other projects are finished. If coal is available local though, I may go that way. It would be more portable around the yard not being tied to a gas line.

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, ArcticDave said:

I know I want to see the knife when its done. Please do share :)

Where do you get the coal?

I haven't decided on what forge to build yet. I like the idea of a traditional fired forge, but I have natural gas service and I've read that folks are making the low pressure from NG work by using homemade ribbon burners and a small blower. I might build a ribbon burner and experiment with it when some other projects are finished. If coal is available local though, I may go that way. It would be more portable around the yard not being tied to a gas line.

 

 

 

I'm paying outrageous prices for coal out of a farrier supply shop in Cave Creek. They sell coke too which lasts longer and burns consistently. If you're only forging occasionally, use charcoal or a hard wood. If you're on my side of the world and want to build a coal forge stop by and I'll supply you what you need to build it, cheap.

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Edge, back in the day it was possible to drive up to Carbondale and in a day of hard shoveling load a couple of tons of clean coal spilled during the train loading process.  Probably not so easy now.  That coal coked beautifully, and was clean enough for consistent forge welds.  When I moved to Alaska, it took me several years of poking around to find a suitable deposit, and when I finally found the spot in the Talkeetnas, I used it for a couple of decades as a source of fuel for the shop heater and forges.  I still remember the Carbondale coal as being consistently less ashy and less sulfurous than what I found up north. 

As for forges, I've used a brake drum and a couple of other found firepots, but my best forge ever I built from a large tile saw table, using a Buffalo firepot.  The old heavy cast Buffalos are really nice if you're working a lot of large pieces.  That big forge, I sold to a young blacksmith in 2007 in Upstate NY, after I broke my back.  He also ended up with my favorite anvil.  I'm glad they both went to a good home.

I like that forge you've built, Edge.  It's reminiscent of the old portable forges with attached hoods, most of which ended up melted for scrap, along with many, many tons of forged anvils, post vices, swedge blocks and other good iron stuff, during WWII.

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Thanks

My next forge will be built from a large trucks drum. I've had my first forge stolen out of my truck. Next they got my old Reliable anvil.

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3 hours ago, Edge said:

Thanks

My next forge will be built from a large trucks drum. I've had my first forge stolen out of my truck. Next they got my old Reliable anvil.

Sorry to hear that. Sounds you got varmints that need a dose of lead poisoning  :41:

Back when I was a heavy truck mechanic, I threw away literally tons of brake drums...nobody ever wanted any of them. They also make great bases for vise and tool stands.

I have a decent anvil available to use. It's a Hay-Budden from 1918 that has been on the property here since the 40's. The top needs to dressed up a bit, but it's still got some life left in it.

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Edge said:

Thanks

My next forge will be built from a large trucks drum. I've had my first forge stolen out of my truck. Next they got my old Reliable anvil.

That's just rotten.  Make the next one heavy enough to guarantee a hernia for the thief. 

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2 hours ago, ArcticDave said:

Sorry to hear that. Sounds you got varmints that need a dose of lead poisoning  :41:

Back when I was a heavy truck mechanic, I threw away literally tons of brake drums...nobody ever wanted any of them. They also make great bases for vise and tool stands.

I have a decent anvil available to use. It's a Hay-Budden from 1918 that has been on the property here since the 40's. The top needs to dressed up a bit, but it's still got some life left in it.

 

 

 

Sweet anvil. My stuff was lost in NM decades ago, nothing lost in a long time.

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The top is still true, but the edges are a bit rough. I have not tried weighing it, but it is pretty stout. 25" total length and about 12" tall. I'm guessing somewhere 150# range. 

20180721_065622.jpg

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