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Badger4715

Recently obtained a 42lb meteorite from a private collection..

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.. where it has been for the last 20 years.  It's passed all of the tests, now I need to get someone to certify it but every official body or department I approach sort of just blows me off with an email.  Where can I take this to get some sort of official documentation showing this is a meteorite?  I'm sorry but I just don't understand how a scientist, who makes their life's work about these things, would not be interested in potentially seeing a new,  undocumented large meteorite that has turned up.    Any thoughts?    Thx.  Badger

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Not too sure that's a meteorite... does it have a window showing the interior?  Did it come with any sort of documentation?

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No, I'm trying to get someone to look at it and GET documentation if it IS real.

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where you located? take it to a floor & tile shop cut a small piece off with a diamond wheel. have a x-ray spectrometer analysis for the elements in it, list the one's one percent and higher. that will give you the class.

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I'm in Phoenix.   How do I get something official on it if the test says it's a meteorite?  Thank you for your response 👍

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Google "meteorite labs".

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Place called, desert valley in Phoenix. Get an analysis, then decide how to proceed. Will help you.

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Badger,

Your stone has none of the visual characteristics of a meteorite. Instead, it has the visual characteristics of not being a meteorite.  Magnetic stones are endless in every corner of the US, especially in Arizona. Your rock has no meteoritic crust, has uncharacteristic vesicles (holes), and apparent molded, terrestrial looking structure. Most meteoritic centers, including ASU, won't bother to look at your rock since they get about a thousand requests every year with no more than one or two actually being meteorites.

Here is my monthly post:

Take a look at your rock. If it glistens like a crystal structure (ie: quartz) at any point in the rock it can’t be a meteorite. If it has layers, it can’t be a meteorite, it’s sedimentary. If it has small gas bubbles in it, it can’t be a meteorite. It’s basalt. If it is moderately magnetic it is not a meteorite. If there is a thick crust on it, it can’t be a meteorite. File off a corner or cut it. It won’t diminish its value. If there is all bright silvery metal it can’t be a meteorite. If it is all grey metal it can’t be a meteorite. If there is black crust as thin as a fingernail, and crazing on the outside of the rock, it might be a meteorite. If there are small silver specks visible in the filed off section, it might be meteorite.

There are billions of magnetic rocks in the US, none of which are meteorites. Anyone can find magnetic earth stones nearly everywhere. Just take a strong magnet and drop into sand and you will see what I mean. Check our O Richard Norton’s, “Rocks from Space” or visit the Arizona State Un. Meteorite Center or other similar facility.

billpeters

P. S. I'm also on Mesa. You may call me at 602-312-9888 and I'll take a look at what you've got.

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"It's passed all of the tests" Where is the open face where it was tested?

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3 hours ago, wet/dry washer said:

Place called, desert valley in Phoenix. Get an analysis, then decide how to proceed. Will help you.

I can't find anything on Google

 

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53 minutes ago, LipCa said:

"It's passed all of the tests" Where is the open face where it was tested?

All the initial test that I've been able to conduct with my limited experience...

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Bill Peters looked at it and does not think it is a meteorite, but I would still like to get it analyzed just because it is such a unique object.  

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Google, Phoenix X-ray spectrometer analysis. PGA

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You can call pawn shops and perhaps they will put it under a machine to tell you the elemental makeup.  A small charge would be reasonable.  I think the pawn shops use XRF analysis.  There's one near me that examines their jewelry this way.  I had rock samples from a tailings pile I wanted to bring there, never did.  I think at best you'll get what elements are in the rock.

On the university websites, they say they no longer accept samples for analysis.  Since it was their life's work and very few meteor hunter's were out there, they used to examine the rocks, but thanks to shows like meteor hunter and forums like this, far too many people doing it now.  The ASU website says something similar to that.

I really don't think there's a place that will officially ID a meteorite for a fee, although for a fee I will print a certificate of authenticity off on my computer, send it to you, and you can fill in the blanks ID what the object is, and sign it as the expert.

Also think there's many orders of magnitude more than billions of magnetic rocks in AZ.  To me it looks like any of the black rocks littering the tops of many places in AZ, like the mountains by Deer Valley or many other places along  I 10 or I 8.

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Here is a picture of a recent fall meteorite.

419575fd-64cf-4203-a566-eb6ca00d0f27_0.j

Do you see anything on the 42 lb rock that would make you think of this?

Also, if your rock was part of a meteorite fall then that fall would have a name which is closely associated with the location where it was found.  Just as a 'for instance' Dolan Dave is showing us pictures of the Holbrook meteorites that he has found.  You might have guessed these can be found near Holbrook.  This helps establish provenance and value for most meteorites.  It takes many years and for some a lifetime to be experts at meteorites.  Ask one of the meteorite dealers in Tucson.  Google 'Tucson Meteorite Dealers' and take your pick of who to call.

Mitchel

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There are meteorite testing sites at NAU in Flagstaff and ASU in Tucson but it is is unlikely that they can help you with what it is, only what it isn't. I would think a local university department could help identify it. With 25 years in the business and thousands of meteorites and meteor-wrongs having crossed my desk I can confidently tell you it is not a meteorite. But if curiosity burns, then a geology lab as close to the source as possible is the way to go, they would know the local rocks better than anyone.

 

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Thank you all for the informative responses!  I will defer to all of your expertise and resign myself to the fact that it is probably not a meteorite, but as said above, my curiosity burns to see exactly what it is...   The pics don't do it justice, it is EXTREMELY heavy for its size and you can clearly see almost crystal like patterns of solid metal in the narrower end.  I have a wet saw with a diamond blade and will attempt to cut a window into it..   I'll post some more pics if I can accomplish this.  Again,  thank you all for the responses and I appreciate any suggestions as they come!!   Badger

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You only need to saw off a small corner. Polish with silicone carbide wet/dry sandpaper.

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1 hour ago, wet/dry washer said:

You only need to saw off a small corner. Polish with silicone carbide wet/dry sandpaper.

What size would you say?

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