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Out with Boulderdash today cruisin around hunting for new spots, We came across a fairly rare Arizona Black Rattlesnake.  This one was nearly full grown at around 30 inches..Not the most poisonous snake in Arizona but known to inject large volumes of venom. Its habitat is limited enough, that you can almost see where we were exploring.  :200:  

Boulderdash scored a couple nuggets, and hopefully he will post them.

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Dang, that sucker is gorgeous.  I've found the black ones are meaner.  I'm not racist or anything, but them black rattlesnakes have attitude.  The lighter colored ones just lay back and smile up at you most of the time.   .... Seriously .... :)

And he is guarding that bedrock.  Silly snake.  No match for Adam and Boulder.

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One of my favorite haunts is infested with these black rattlers. Yes, they are aggressive. They have a den in a small mineshaft, the opening to which is heavily brush-covered. If you approach the den, and they sense your presence, they will begin rattling. One morning I had just bagged a nice nugget, then immediately I encountered an unhappy rattler. Prudence dictated that I move a short distance away. Got a second nugget, then immediately encountered rattler number 2. The third nugget was immediately followed with a third snake. All three could be quickly relocated by their buzzing. I wimped out and headed for a more snake-less area.

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I'm so happy that this area of the world has poisonous snakes that let themselves be known.  Most places are not like that.

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You seem to be a real snake magnet lately?  Too bad it doesn't work on chicks :4chsmu1:

Tom H.

 

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No sense of humor at all-John

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Beautiful snake!

Chris

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Good pics in da hood !

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Amazing photos! When they are in those black rocks you never see them unless they move. 

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Awesome pics Mr.   I've never seen a black rattler.

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14 hours ago, adam said:

Out with Boulderdash today cruisin around hunting for new spots, We came across a fairly rare Arizona Black Rattlesnake.  This one was nearly full grown at around 30 inches..Not the most poisonous snake in Arizona but known to inject large volumes of venom. Its habitat is limited enough, that you can almost see where we were exploring.  :200:  

Boulderdash scored a couple nuggets, and hopefully he will post them.

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Nice pics. I saw a black snake with yellow or gold markings many years ago. I couldn't see the tail so I couldn't tell if it was a rattler or not. What color are the markings on these?

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Looks just like the one I saw years ago about 18 miles West of Wikieup, AZ

He was also at the entrance of an old mine. 

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40 minutes ago, Morlock said:

Nice pics. I saw a black snake with yellow or gold markings many years ago. I couldn't see the tail so I couldn't tell if it was a rattler or not. What color are the markings on these?

Did the snake you saw look like either of these..if so they're both King Snakes, first is a common King Snake and second is a Desert King Snake, both eat many different kinds of  prey. but their prey also includes venomous snakes of which the Kings Snakes are immue to the venom.

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I've encountered a few of those guys near the chicken ranch east of Rich Hill...Pretty snakes and those I ran across just wanted to go their own way...Those up there had brighter yellow than that in you photo... Cheers, Unc

 

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Hey Adam, glad you posted about this Arizona snake.  In the mountains of Southern California, specifically in and above Holcomb Valley (near Big Bear Lake) at around elevation 7600' to 7,800' the Timber Rattlers are virtually invisible to me when I'm wearing polaroid sunglasses -- until they rear up.  For some reason they are a very dark color at that altitude similar to your Arizona variety.  I just stand still, hold my search coil above them from a respectful distance and wait patiently.  Soon they yield to the gentle intimidation, do a 180 and head to one of their hides.  Thanks for sharing the photo.

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That dude looks totally out of his element. There is no camouflage for him in the white/tan rocks

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BEAUTIFUL Snake Adam, love ya for not hating it my friend. The desert is a special place and true prospectors see that and respect it.

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Here are the couple of nuggets found in a new to me area.  The larger one was sun baking even though I was in the shade at the time.  

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When I was a youngster, the JCs bought king snakes from Prescott kids every year, to use in their fake Hopi rattlesnake dances.  There were several JC snake collection sites around town -- the one I sold to was at a gas station at Gurley and Grove.  One year, I was the only kid who showed up with snakes at that collection spot, and boy, I had a bunch of them.  I bought a lawnmower with the proceeds.

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Posted (edited)
On 4/14/2018 at 7:52 PM, fishing8046 said:

That dude looks totally out of his element. There is no camouflage for him in the white/tan rocks

I always assumed they were just made to be pretty to other snakes, and weren't meant to be camouflaged.  Also, unlike some other snakes, the hunting tactics of king snakes and some rattlers don't require concealment from prey, as they tend to go down holes and grab what they want (mammals and sometimes other snakes), rather than lying in wait.   

Edited by Saul R W
typoo

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I remember the dances by the JCs and always wondered just where they got all their snakes.  They would release them unharmed after the parades and such.  Although they were a fake bunch of Indians they were a great attraction.  Good to hear that you were a part of Prescott's history, Saul.   :thumbsupanim  

   Old Tom

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Tom, the JCs placed an ad in the Courier and ran radio spots (probably on KNOT) six or eight weeks ahead of time every year, and then set up cages at the collection sites.  It was $2 per snake, and if dance time drew near and they were short on snakes, they raised the price as high as $5.  The trick was holding onto your snakes until the price rose, but not waiting until they'd reached the snake quota -- it was good early training for playing the commodities market.  I think the minimum length they'd accept was 30 inches, and there was a nice premium for anything over 48 inches. 

The JCs also bought chicken feathers for costumes.  A paper grocery sack filled with black hen feathers was worth considerably more than one filled with red or white ones.  A world in which your entire portfolio consisted of feathers and snakes was a pretty nice place to live.

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Sure glad snakes aren't one of my worries while I'm out chasing the nuggets.

Those of you that have to dodge them, be careful out there!

All the best,

Lanny

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