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Desertpilot

Hand tools for moving large rocks.

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All,

Im needing to move some rocks out of a dry creek bed that are in the 100-200lb range. I've been thinking of using a come along or a griphoist? Having no experience at this, I'd like to ask you all what has worked the best for you in this situation? For the most part I will need to just drag the rocks out of the way but on occasion I will need to pull a rock out of a hole.  

Thanks 

DP

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Do you have 4WD vehicle with you? Wrap a chain,rope cable.
QUAD/sidexside with a winch.
WORSE case scenario, dig out one side an prybar it over !

 

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Grip hoist and a rock net.

They are pricey but well worth the money in my opinion. New ones are real $$, used ones are more reasonable. Mine is from the 70's and still works flawlessly.

I have a T.19 which is a smaller hoist and it will easily move a 1000lb  boulder where I want it. Grip hoists are a much safer choice for manual operations because they have a set of shear pins that will fail  before the cable or mechanisms contained within the hoist. The pins can be replaced easily onsite.

There are some good deals on ebay right now for used grip hoist. The best deals are the ones that include good condition wire rope.

A rock net can be purchased for around $150

Definitely frequent yard sales and such as you may find a really good deal on one, Its where I picked up my T.19 and rope for $75.

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I still have my boulder strap, purchased at Keene years ago.  Pretty strong a 2000lb come-along was ruined, handle bent. Had to by a 5000lb one and a pulley system to move the boulders in Piru Creek by Hardluck camp.

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4 hours ago, lucidfind said:

Grip hoist and a rock net.

They are pricey but well worth the money in my opinion. New ones are real $$, used ones are more reasonable. Mine is from the 70's and still works flawlessly.

I have a T.19 which is a smaller hoist and it will easily move a 1000lb  boulder where I want it. Grip hoists are a much safer choice for manual operations because they have a set of shear pins that will fail  before the cable or mechanisms contained within the hoist. The pins can be replaced easily onsite.

There are some good deals on ebay right now for used grip hoist. The best deals are the ones that include good condition wire rope.

A rock net can be purchased for around $150

Definitely frequent yard sales and such as you may find a really good deal on one, Its where I picked up my T.19 and rope for $75.

You can make a rock net/sling from tire/snow chains.

https://www.codot.gov/business/process-improvement/everyday-lean-innovations-ideas/201crock-net201d-improves-safety-efficiency-for-moving-large-rocks-from-roadway

Or you can rig your own out of cable and or chains, some photos to give you some ideas..

https://www.google.com/search?q=rock+lifting+sling&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjdqaeYuPbZAhVFi1kKHej3DbYQsAQIggE&biw=1366&bih=637

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Awesome,

 

Thanks for the reply’s! That should get me going in the right direction.

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dynamite? :)
Tom H.

 

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45 minutes ago, TomH said:

dynamite? :)
Tom H.

 

If I can get the usfs and BLM to buy off that it’s a hand tool then yes. :yesss:

There are a few boulders I’d like to break up so I’ve been looking at micro blasting and the other chemical methods as well.

Ive done micro blasting at a previous job and I think it’s pretty cool but it’s expensive. 

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1 hour ago, Desertpilot said:

If I can get the usfs and BLM to buy off that it’s a hand tool then yes. :yesss:

There are a few boulders I’d like to break up so I’ve been looking at micro blasting and the other chemical methods as well.

Ive done micro blasting at a previous job and I think it’s pretty cool but it’s expensive. 

Since you have to drill either way, I think the various expanding compounds would be the way to go, not as exciting as micro blasting but more affordable.

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I have a Griphoist T-516.  I had a come-along and there is no comparison.  The Griphoist is significantly more efficient use of your time and energy.  Also, much more flexible in anchor locations and where the big rock piles end up.  I do intend on adding something like the Sierra Blaster to the arsenal. 

 

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I moved a 6' tall rectangular boulder with a two tow hoists attached together.  If the boulders just weigh 100 - 200 LBS, I'd consider several lengths of Walmart rope tied together and attached to the truck.  I've got decorator rock I'd like to take back with me, but its 500 feet up the creek.  This rock must weigh at least 400 LBS.  Every year the rains wash it about 6' closer.  Probably won't be around when it washes close enough for me to get it in the truck.

Whatever you get, just look for anchor locations.  If the towed load is huge, not many places in the local desert to attach something to.  When I said there were no boulders or trees to attach my stuck truck to, someone suggested I simply bury a tire 6' deep and then use a hoist.  There's something that looks like a boat anchor that attaches to a wench, and that is the only thing I think would work consistently here for extremely heavy jobs.

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Yes, it's called a "land anchor" or "ground anchor" also referred too as a "deadman" usually when you bury a log to pull against, many different makes and designs, some much better than others, where's there's nothing to attach a winch or hoist too they are indispensable!

Photos..

https://www.google.com/search?q=land+anchor&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiZ7MbCpffZAhWvuVkKHbYbDecQsAQI8wE&biw=1366&bih=637#imgrc=_

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A big thank you for everyone who chipped in with the above info.  All contain excellent advice.

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I use an old tire chain on smaller boulders and my quad winch. Much better to use a pulley system on heavier rocks than a straight pull, using 2 and even 3 to 1 pulleys save on equipment, you move things slower / safer.

 

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Never thought of using a quad for stuff like that.  Putting that on my reasons I "need" to get one.

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Yeah the quad stuff would be cool but I can only hike into my claims and a couple waterfalls prevent quad access. Unless I winch over the falls:89:

I ordered a more power puller and hopefully it’s delivered today. Since I’m stuck waiting for the winch I’m going to work on reopening some adits and detecting some tailings piles. 

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Good old hand winch with a truckers strap-4" -work mighty fine. They contour,grab and hold and never break and no cable style whiplash-John

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Hoser: What type/model hand winch have you found to work best?

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On 3/25/2018 at 12:44 AM, Micro Nugget said:

Hoser: What type/model hand winch have you found to work best?

I used to have a 3.5 HP Honda powered D.A.M. industries winch that used a gear reduction "roto tiller" type motor...it was a great design that had a high an low speed and you switched gears with a lever on top that acted like a bicycle derailer...or gear shifter... on the chain and sprocket...it also had a reverse sprocket and chain.

 I could get that winch wherever I needed it.....just start it and guide it.  At various times, I had mounted it to two wheels, a sled and even a twelve foot aluminum boat....if you ever come across one and want to really move a lot of heavy rocks, snag it up..

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Thanks, good food for thought.  Primarily I'm looking for something non-motorized that has a good reputation for reliability and functionality that can be carried in or strapped to a backpack.

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Please pardon a newbie stepping right up with advice.  I've been reading the forums for a while, and noticed that there's a member named Adam who moves and stacks mountains of rocks and boulders using a device he calls a Boulder Dash.  This Adam fellow claims that his Boulder Dash contraption runs on water, all day on only three gallons.  Although I'm not certain whether or not it can be carried via backpack, it does seem to have a reputation for reliability and functionality.  If I needed to move a lot of rocks, I'd look into renting a Boulder Dash by the day.  Happy hunting -- Saul

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27 minutes ago, Saul R W said:

Please pardon a newbie stepping right up with advice.  I've been reading the forums for a while, and noticed that there's a member named Adam who moves and stacks mountains of rocks and boulders using a device he calls a Boulder Dash.  This Adam fellow claims that his Boulder Dash contraption runs on water, all day on only three gallons.  Although I'm not certain whether or not it can be carried via backpack, it does seem to have a reputation for reliability and functionality.  If I needed to move a lot of rocks, I'd look into renting a Boulder Dash by the day.  Happy hunting -- Saul

Best post I've seen in quite awhile....

Welcome Saul.  :thumbsupanim

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5 hours ago, Saul R W said:

Please pardon a newbie stepping right up with advice.  I've been reading the forums for a while, and noticed that there's a member named Adam who moves and stacks mountains of rocks and boulders using a device he calls a Boulder Dash.  This Adam fellow claims that his Boulder Dash contraption runs on water, all day on only three gallons.  Although I'm not certain whether or not it can be carried via backpack, it does seem to have a reputation for reliability and functionality.  If I needed to move a lot of rocks, I'd look into renting a Boulder Dash by the day.  Happy hunting -- Saul

Welcome to the forum Saul!

I agree  your advice is some of the best posted by a newbie or old timer for that matter!

Unfortunately these Boulder Dash devices are very much in demand and very, very hard to aquire, from what I have heard they are back ordered and the wait maybe years to get one.

From what I have read these devices do have a automatic mode and once set it will work endlessly without anymore attention and actually very hard to stop once set to this setting, if anyone is lucky enough to aquire one I would advise to make sure you have it well secured when left unattended so it's not stolen, I would recommend a couple of very heavy logging chains with multiple locks, don't worry though these security measures will not imped it's working ability it will still work properly even with these measures installed.

 

Edit: I forgot to add it's rumored that if you run out of the required water to operate this device beer can be substituted and production will actually increase at the beginning but after a period of time you will experience minor production decline.

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