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How to look for and find Gold

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Just a short condensed description on how and where to find gold.
 I have promoted Jim Straights books for many years, "Follow the Drywashers" and others. because they are well written they are a great  inexpensive alternative to not having to know a lot about geology if your new to the game of gold prospecting/detecting and not wanting to hunt everything/everywhere. or not wanting dig up a whole creek bed looking, you have other options you may not be aware of as well.
Jim's books primarily focus on and teaches you about drywashing and what to look for as far as indicators of old workings (hand stacked rocks-classified piles etc.)and includes places to start looking for gold left behind by the old timers, his books are an easy way to start finding gold without having to have a masters degree in gold associated geology to understand them. I should say Jim is a personal friend of mine and has been for many years. his books helped me find a lot more gold.There is also a lot of great general prospecting info in them too. well worth the price. and Im not going to get into more details about whats in his books for obvious reasons.
 But I should also say based on my research and years spent in the gold fields Ive found that many of the old timers knew little about geology and missed many gold deposits. I have proved this by finding other cracks in their prospecting techniques so to speak in recent years that made them leave behind a lot of gold.
Generally most of them tested (panned-drywashed) every wash they could find and most used a trial and error method in washes to sort out where to find gold and to work. I don't know about you but I don't have the time or the patience for that method anymore. and that method alone has many other mistakes they made that caused them to miss a lot of gold and I'll get into that later.
OK Here are some of them.
Many gold deposits in creeks,washes and rivers where ground out by flooding of the creek or river bedrock from gold bearing veins crossing them. but not all of them. much of the gold in them drained into them from many hillside placers and are the result of slower gravity erosion and not influenced by water as much as in the creeks and washes. so the same rules don't always apply to them. and yes there are a lot of rules to gold and my list is still growing but the longer the list gets the more gold I find.
Many gold deposit outcrops up on hillsides Ive found haven't made it to the nearest wash,creek or river yet. many are much younger than the gold in many of the creeks and they are still in the process of eroding down a ridge, hillside etc. from quartz veins or with other gold associated geologic deposits. much of the larger gold is still stuck up on these ridges and slopes. sure in some cases the smaller gold from these outcrops may have made to a nearby wash but not enough gold for the old timers to pursue by hand working or their testing methods and were abandoned, in many cases not leaving much if any indicators the old timers even tested them. keep in mind, they didn't have metal detectors. If you using a metal detector you already have a huge edge on the old timers.
In some cases the smarter prospectors noticed or they suspected where the gold was coming from because they left small test holes at the upper edge of creeks or even in the hillside nugget patches but the gold was scattered out and with larger slower moving nuggets not confined or concentrated in a wash so they abandoned these too. many patches I've found have had no test digs at all. I found them based on geology and common geologic indicators associated with gold.
I have found decent gold "leavins" as I call them (gold the old timers missed)in the old timers drywash workings. "semi-virgin patches",(found and worked by the old timers but never hunted with a metal detector).
But I've have to say where I've found my best "multi-pound" (many ounces) "virgin patches",  (never discovered by anyone) in most cases is up out of the drainages using geology alone.
 just so you understand my terminology I've included some of my common terminologies. i.e. "pounded patches" etc with an explanation/definition of them.
"Pounded Patches"(found by the old timers and detected to death or near death with metal detectors determined by depth and the metal detectors that have proceeded you and your detecting skills)
Well I'm out of time folks so I'm going to leave you with this.
I have been successfully nugget hunting for almost 40 years, and here is a general list of what has worked for me.
You can start with #1 and add #2, #3,#4 and #5.
#1. Hunt everything and everywhere.
#2.Get private help and instruction.
#3. Do research to find known gold mining areas, prospecting books included. browse the forum.
#4. look for and follow the drywashers.
#5. learn about geology.
I recommend #2 through #5.
More later as time permits.
AzNuggetBob

 

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Great write-up Bob. 

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Nice bucket of knowledge ya shared there Bob and I too learned allot from our good friend Jim Straight, both in reading and talking. The thing I would like to add to folks new to detecting here is this. As I read Bob's post I was smiling because him and I think and hunt in very similar fashion.... That should really make you pay attention to the above post as I echo the same info in my writings and seminars. It is not the detector that finds the gold it is YOU! The detector simply helps ya find it and then gather it. Success lies in your ability to research, listen, learn, and as Bob said "hunt everything and everywhere" you will constantly learn and as a result the nugget count will rise.... It isn't easy, but sure is rewarding when ya walk into a spot that produces several ounces or more.....

Hey Bob keep the good stuff coming :old:

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Good stuff Bob, people will benefit from this. I’ll share a few thoughts as well. People seem to place old timers (both placer and lode seekers) in the “god” success class of prospectors; however, the truth is they were just like any other group of people looking to accomplish something specific. They were very much like the people on this forum when it comes to being successful in finding gold: some found more than others, some lacked experience and/or knowledge, some did not try hard enough, some were very successful, the list goes on. The old saying applies, when the legend becomes fact, people believe the legend. Not all old timers were economically dependent on gold either, some were. The drive behind dependence vs independence often played into their individual success and focus. 

Expanding on your note on old timer mistakes/trial and error, when it came to placer gold, the old timers often missed washes with great nugget gold because not every wash out there contains appreciable amounts of both fine, flake, and nugget gold. I’ve found many washes that showed signs of old timer testing, scattered handstacks, old trash that can be dated: solder bottoms, glass, tobacco stars, etc. and yet our detectors picked up many ounces of nuggets from grams to over an ounce or more in the wash. When we’ve hiked drywashers into some of these areas with vacuums and sometimes, the wash was almost devoid of fine and flake gold. It was a case of the old timers not seeing the forest for the trees. Now one might think, well the old timers got all the fine gold and the nuggets came later; however, the evidence on site proved that to simply not be true. Their efforts, techniques, and lack of technology all factored into their decision that the pursuit of the area was not worthwhile. This topic in and of itself has several branches that I won’t get into right now but it’s just food for thought about human nature and technology. 

With lode and pocket miners, many of them were sloppy due to reliance upon visuals for success. We’ve found many ounces of gold at old mine and dig sites where the old timers simply tossed aside chunks of rock (hand cobbles) where by sight no showing of gold was present. Our detectors told a very different story. Makes you wonder what the technology of the next 100 years will make our efforts with detectors today look like? I can hear it now "Man, those old timers of the 21st century with those crude detectors missed a lot gold!" :)

Completely agree with your notes on virgin patches. The ones that we’ve discovered are up and out of the drainages in most cases. On this note, I’ve observed that people tend to look at any area in a very “now” state of mind. What I mean by this is they believe that what they see before them in the landscape, at face value, is what the landscape has been. Nothing could be further from the truth, the earth is old (how old exactly I don’t think anyone really knows) but landscapes change over time. Many gold bearing washes have changed course over time and it takes a lot of practice to notice the subtle changes on the ground that can sometimes take you from "the gold ends here" to "the gold continues up the hill that way".

Every prospector starts at the beginning and today, with these forums alone, people have a huge edge on those of us who started out decades ago (34 years for me). None of us knows it all, we're all constantly learning, and every one of us is an evolving story. Another early morning post made with insufficient coffee :rolleyes:

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I can't stress the " hunt everything and everywhere" comment enough. If you're looking for a new patch,  most likely you're not going to find one in the main districts. Hunt the peripheries even if it's two, three or more miles away. That's where I had most of my success.

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Well now Bob look what ya went and Done.... Thanks Rod for the always great thoughts as well, but I am thinking this will be another epic thread for folks learning to learn how to find gold. Can't wait till some of the many other highly successful and savvy members get too adding their 2 cents... Buckle up folks.

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34 minutes ago, Bill Southern said:

Well now Bob look what ya went and Done.... Thanks Rod for the always great thoughts as well, but I am thinking this will be another epic thread for folks learning to learn how to find gold. Can't wait till some of the many other highly successful and savvy members get too adding their 2 cents... Buckle up folks.

See what I mean about lack of coffee in the morning :rolleyes: coffee = reading comprehension :idea:

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Great read Bob! Thank you

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I'm following this thread for sure. Folks helping others, thanks from me, some great learning here.  Cooper.

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Thanks to all three of you! I believe you all mention geology being the other key. It would be great if any of you, but preferably all of you could expand on that!

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Ah Geology.... Lot to learn there if you want to be a geologist, but I want to hunt gold so I dabble in geology so to speak. I use as part of my research technique the map showing placer deposits of Arizona, oh and remember most that produced less than 5000.00 dollars worth in the time period these maps were produced were left out. YES they were as not deemed as economically important. So what does that mean to me? 

 

 1382036_588867664507410_465609937_n.jpg

 

So i use a method some say is odd, but it works..... I use a geological map of Arizona and use it to identify likely spots to explore for gold and evidence of placering from those before.  Doing this First off teaches me the geology that is important to find gold, but I also began to understand why some areas in AZ are good and some not. Below is a geological map, look at the color patterns in the areas shown on the above map..... 

azgeomap_all400.jpg

Now these are just photos of the geological maps so you do not see that below on the actual map each color represents certain rock and minerals as  well as gravels distributed across Arizona. This has paid well for me in places with no recorded gold production...... Just a tip and look for the areas similar in geology (or just us colors). More to it, but you'll figure it out. That will involve a few 10.00 books to aid in understanding the relationships of these mineras to gold deposits. Arizona Gold Placering, by Maureen Johnson and placer deposits of Arizona by Eldred Wilson :old:

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Bill shared some great information and thoughts about geology. Building on what he shared and living in the digital world, you can overlay geological maps right over topographical maps to the 7.5 minute quadrangle level and greater. Sometimes this is even done for you if you look in the right places. Now this method of mapping is in no way an X marks the spot but yet another method of research to greater understanding. What could boots on the ground reveal? 

If you locate an area of interest and have the topo and geologic map, you can also take the time to read a geologic bulletin (geological survey bulletin) of the area, if available, and if you can find them. Many are online such as this one https://pubs.usgs.gov/bul/1701c/report.pdf Some of the old publication date bulletins you have to be lucky enough to find and buy. Geologic bulletins are full of detailed and educational information on an area if you take the time to read and understand them. One item that might catch your interest is reading about associated minerals in an area. Minerals associated with gold in one area could prove applicable in another area. 

When you begin researching maps be careful not to make the mistake of associating every mine, prospect, or dig with gold at face value. Dig a little deeper.

Edited by Rod
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Since joining this site, which was just weeks ago, I look at rocks differently. I now want the knowledge and starting to look at more books other than just gold. I wish when I was back in school I wanted to learn as much as I do now.

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On 1/12/2018 at 8:35 AM, Rod said:

See what I mean about lack of coffee in the morning :rolleyes: coffee = reading comprehension :idea:

Exactly what I am doing right now ... on my 4th cup! Lazy Saturday morning! :old::4chsmu1:

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Yo All...When I first started mining and prospecting in 1977, I had the great good fortune of meeting old "Tatoo George" Muth in Northern CA ...  He had worked the Rich Hill placer areas back in the '30's and '40's and had hunted a large drainage off the Scott River headwaters near the Trinity Divide since the 1920's with a partner he called the "Old One Eyed Guy" ... He was a big fan of old channel up on the hillsides ... He also taught me about looking for mineral colors ... He always said that the more different colors of mineralization the better the chances for gold ... He also showed me areas where "pocket hunters" had scored many pounds of gold below ore outcrops ... By sampling hillsides near the edges of the area below the outcrops (what our Aussie bros call "Loaming"),  you can sometimes find the pockets where the gold has been halted on its gravity fueled trip downhill.... While a bland looking hill side can often be devoid of gold, sometimes the edges of the bland ground can really produce ... I've found a number of virgin patches where the gold was in boring grey ground surrounded by hot looking gossan ... The gossan was barren, but the grey ground is sometimes littered with gold...  Specific minerals I look for are ironstone, quartz, greenstone, pyrite and iron schist striated bedrock ... One of my big surprises was learning that the gold actually sometimes forms in the iron schist bedrock without the immediate presence of quartz ... Fingers tired but I'll try to add some find pix found in such ground ... Cheers, Unc

Half ozer Happy RidgeRon.jpg

Happy Gold Patch Studio.jpg

Happy Ridge 2-5-13 studio.jpg

Happy Ridge Half Oz Studio.jpg

Edited by Uncle Ron
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As always you men of experience have had the opportunity to be on the cutting edge of this great hobby. Each of you has had the opportunity to share the ground with some of the original legends. Miners who had figured it out long before any of this. It is very much appreciated, the effort to help educate the next and future generations of prospectors. 

Thanks, Guys I hope you don't mind a few more questions.

 

Bill,

I can see what you mean comparing the 2 maps. I am curious if you have a link to those maps? Since down south there are less geological areas it would be nice to be able to zoom in and have the legends. These 2 maps with boots on the ground are a great combination! What $10 mineral books would you recommend to help understand the mineral relationship of minerals to gold?

Rod,

Awesome informational link!  I am a southern Arizona hunter the Harquahala Mountains are way out of my range. Could you help the forum out with a link to the main site? Those are some very Comprehensive geological reports. 

Ron,

1st question is that picture taken on the patch of ground where that piece of gold was found? No, don't tell!

The statement about the minerals colors relating to gold was very telling considering some of the recent posts with the blond sand peppered with an array of colored minerals. I was hoping that you would be so kind as to nail down the colors of the 4 minerals you mention in your post. If possible a link to each " hot looking Gossan",  ironstone, quartz, greenstone, pyrite and iron schist striated bedrock.

I really like this quote of yours

"He also taught me about looking for mineral colors ... He always said that the more different colors of mineralization the better the chances for gold"

Thanks again for all of you who have shared and to all of you who will jump in and share.

 

 

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Very Nice Ron. Great photo's. keep them coming.

Rod great posts with lots of info and you reminded me of several subjects I need to comment on too.
Thanks for your input Rod.

Its nice to see some other very experienced prospectors here sharing also.
Thanks to all of you that have been posting here. there is a lot more to come.


Thanks Bill
I think we may have let the Jeanie out of the bottle on this one.
I agree the prospecting books are worth their weight in gold. Both new books and old.when you mentioned low production areas. shoooth your letting some secrets out of the bag. just kiddin, so am I. :D
I  have also found that if they don't have all the glitz of the higher production areas they don't draw the crowds. so you don't have all the pre-hunted pressure of the well known areas. Ive done well hunting these low production areas and for years have concentrated on them. some have even been on now private land and I have even knocked on peoples door and successfully asked permission to hunt them. some didn't even know that the land their house is on was mined for gold long ago.
Bill I took that idea to the next level and I thought I would throw in an educational story.
Here is another little prospecting secret I sort of accidentally happened into. as you can imagine over the years of nugget hunting I have collected an extensive prospecting and geology book collection including maps. for years I specifically collected old ones. (sort of a hobby) I notice that many years ago some of these so called low production areas have been dropped from newer publications and maps. many of the books I have are very old original publications and are rare and very hard to find. On the flip side many of the newer publications have new gold discoveries that are not in the older ones as well.

I've told this story before but I decided to add more details so more people can learn how I did it. I didnt always share some of my hunting secrets.
One area I found in a prospecting book is today, a new housing subdivision. two-three acre lots.This was several years ago. I did my research and found out who owned it. It turned out to be a real estate developer. I explained to him that I am a professional nugget hunter and what all I had in mind and what all it involved. I got permission from the real estate developer to hunt it until the new lots were sold. he didn't even want a percentage of any gold I found.
Hunting on a percentage has gotten me into several private gold mining claims. I have several examples of what I've found on these deals. I'll put up photos later.
 

He had some knowledge of mining and seemed more intrigued by my idea than anything. Anyway I get in there (locked gate) he gave me a key and so I'm in there and I'm sizing the place up. I'm lookin at the topography and the mineralisation and of course for signs of the old timers workings. the realtor had already graded out the roads and sites for the new lots.
There was very little written about it. it was like a one small paragraph burp in the book. I think in one of Maureen Johnson's books.

So I head down to the creek and I spot hand stacked rocks along a small section of the creek. always a good place to start when you find the old timers hand stacks. so I'm hitting lots of trash along the creek and my pick magnet is filling up fast from the old timers trash. so I move up the creek to see if the gold is coming down the creek.  I did manage to get a couple nuggets out of the upper end of the creek before the gold just quit. so as Im moving up I notice the hand stacking stopped. the old timers had stopped working the creek. usually a sign that the gold had stopped in the creek. that told me that the gold was not coming down stream anymore. Im looking around I dont see a vein crossing the creek? where is the gold coming from? so I moved up the ridge onto some benches looking for the source of the gold and I start seeing quartz float coming down the hillside, and real red dirt in this one area. as Im working my way back and forth across the hillside and I hit a bullet. I move on and another bullet. Hmmm not looking good so far. I get another target and I remember thinking another bullet? I"ve got the target in my hand after swinging my hand over the coil and as I'm wiping the dirt from it with my thumb I see the glint of Gold. Oh yah I jumped up, game on!
It was about a two grammer and very coarse. now I knew there was gold up on the benches also and it hadn't traveled very far. From there I was hitting gold almost every other target. I'd found the source that was bleeding gold down the ridge into the creek., from there I was hitting nuggets high on the hillside above the creek. Classic hillside patch. a little brushy but easy diggin and low trash. most of the nuggets were only a few inches deep.

The trash ratio ended up about one to two bullets per nugget. most of the nuggets got coarser and larger as I expected. the quartz float and hematite and magnetite nuggets were getting thicker the higher I went. The source of the gold was obvious by then. I later worked my way up and found the vein. you could see where the old timers had taken some sample digs on it here and there but never pursued it on a larger scale.

The old timers had hit the washes hard, but not the ridges. also where there was less trash and by then I think I was up to about four ounces. but here is the real kicker.
A few days later, Not sure why just got up Christmas eve morning and decided I needed to go hunting. maybe had to get my gold fix? .
So I decide Im going to go hit this same area. see if I couldn't sqeek one or two more nuggets out of the area before I gave up on it. I also knew I was running out of time on it as the lots were selling around it pretty fast. every day I was there I'd see the real estate agent bringing in new prospective buyers. he would stop and ask well how ya doing, finding anymore? yep got a few more. Id show him and I remember him jokingly saying I'll price these lots a little higher. LOL
Tell you the truth I almost purchased that lot.
Nuthing like nugget hunting gold in your own back yard.
but by then I had hit it pretty hard, I thought.

Anyway I get up there and its just starting to snow again. Im walking around up on the upper end of patch where I'd been finding the nuggets before, but I move over to right some because I see this slight depression on the hillside. I get into that depression and I'm swinging along and I'm only there about an hour and its starting to get cold fast. the snow is picking up. by then Im wet, its getting muddy. Im slip sliding in the red clay muck and I'm starting to think maybe this wasn't such a good idea after all.

It wasnt a few swings later and I get this faint whoom from my detector, hot ground? it was mineralized red and very hot ground in there. I scrape off the inch or two of snow and check it again. whoom- whoom, still there. I check my ground balance to the side and swing over it again, its still there. and its a wide hit not a quick zip zip. so Im pounding thru the clay with my pick and I get down six or seven more inches and its still there and its getting louder,very loud. I widen the hole so I can get my coil in there and go down another six or seven inches and hit soft green schist bedrock and check the hole again, its gone. I look at my pick magnet, nothing?. I turn to check the pile and wham! Its blowing my ears off. I drop down to my knees and in the first hand full of mud and clay I got it, and it's screaming as I move my hand over the coil. I remember thinking this better not be trash. and It wasn't as I rubbed the clay away it was a big chunk of gold!

Here is a photo of the average gold I was finding in there.

 

where to find find gold 007.JPG

 

Here is a photo of the big one I took of it as soon as I got home and got it washed off. I just layed it on a railroad parking tie out in front of my house next to a penny for the photo.
 I call this nugget the Merry Christmas Nugget.

 

 

Sorry its a bit blurry, its a photo of a photo. I no longer own the nugget.

 

It was a very Merry Christmas.
It weighed about three and a half ounces.
Detector I was using was a Fisher Gold Bug VLF metal detector with a 14" coil.
Take care out there.
AzNuggetBob

new gold 002.JPG

Edited by AzNuggetBob
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This is shaping up to be a fun thread. Great pics Ron :4chsmu1: One note on quartz I’d like to share as it comes up so often: most quartz is devoid of gold. When I see quartz and want to get excited about gold, aside from the good old red dirt, iron/ochre stains and vugs :rolleyes: what I really like to see is quartz containing or with/nearby any of the following nearby: calcite, hematite, chrysocolla, pyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, tourmaline, and a few other associated minerals and sulfides. Which ones? Go do some reading and diver deeper :idea: In some areas tourmaline is all over the place but you won’t find much gold, same goes for the others, none are a guarantee but can be pieces of the hunt puzzle. I like limonite a great deal too :)

5 hours ago, fishing8046 said:

Rod,

Awesome informational link!  I am a southern Arizona hunter the Harquahala Mountains are way out of my range. Could you help the forum out with a link to the main site? Those are some very Comprehensive geological reports. 

 

Thanks fish. Google is your friend (well not really) but it will help you find the answers you seek and it's good practice like Bill said, surprise yourself  :yesss: Blonde sand? This is an old pic, (2003-2004) with my good old GP Extreme and brick battery :black_knight_standing: this wash was quite blonde too but had some great gold in it. Probably still does :inocent:

chole.jpg

Edited by Rod
fixed typo
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28 minutes ago, AzNuggetBob said:

Here is a photo of the big one I took of it as soon as I got home and got it washed off. I just layed it on a railroad parking tie out in front of my house next to a penny for the photo.
 I call this nugget the Merry Christmas Nugget.

Sorry its a bit blurry, its a photo of a photo. I no longer own the nugget.

It was a very Merry Christmas.
It weighed about three and a half ounces.
Detector I was using was a Fisher Gold Bug VLF metal detector with a 14" coil.

Great story and pics Bob :thumbsupanim

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3 hours ago, Rod said:

This is shaping up to be a fun thread. Great pics Ron :4chsmu1: One note on quartz I’d like to share as it comes up so often: most quartz is devoid of gold. When I see quartz and want to get excited about gold, aside from the good old red dirt, iron/ochre stains and vugs :rolleyes: what I really like to see is quartz containing or with/nearby any of the following nearby: calcite, hematite, chrysocolla, pyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, tourmaline, and a few other associated minerals and sulfides. Which ones? Go do some reading and diver deeper :idea: In some areas tourmaline is all over the place but you won’t find much gold, same goes for the others, none are a guarantee but can be pieces of the hunt puzzle. I like limonite a great deal too :)

Thanks fish. Google is your friend (well not really) but it will help you find the answers you seek and it's good practice like Bill said, surprise yourself  :yesss: Blonde sand? This is an old pic, (2003-2004) with my good old GP Extreme and brick battery :black_knight_standing: this wash was quite blonde too but had some great gold in it. Probably still does :inocent:

chole.jpg

I agree about the quartz Rod.
Most quartz doesn't carry gold. but when it's combined or bordered in faults with other minerals it becomes a conveyer of gold in solutions. such as iron based minerals. hematite, ironite,mercury or Cinnabar. etc. and this is what causes the red staining in the earth around it. vugs in quartz mean nothing without other elements that cause the gold to precipitate in the fractured quartz or next to the quartz. this is why you find quartz with gold only formed on one side of it. In some cases the gold comes in later in the form of solutions after the quartz has already formed. Its still a good inicater in many areas but not all. If the right minerals are not present with it, gold is not going to form. In many areas Its also a matter of what's happening with the P.H. (acidic-alkalin) and temperture of the solutions.
And I agree about the Blonde sand too. Sun bleached Blonde sand and gravel on the surface means nothing. It tells nothing about what may be below it. The only thing it does tell is that area has been exposed to a lot of natural weathering for a very long time and the surface gravel is probably high in granits regardless of the schist bedrock with quartz stringers around it and the probable source of the gold.
AzNuggetBob

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On ‎1‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 5:55 PM, Bill Southern said:

Ah Geology.... Lot to learn there if you want to be a geologist, but I want to hunt gold so I dabble in geology so to speak. I use as part of my research technique the map showing placer deposits of Arizona, oh and remember most that produced less than 5000.00 dollars worth in the time period these maps were produced were left out. YES they were as not deemed as economically important. So what does that mean to me? 

 

 1382036_588867664507410_465609937_n.jpg

 

So i use a method some say is odd, but it works..... I use a geological map of Arizona and use it to identify likely spots to explore for gold and evidence of placering from those before.  Doing this First off teaches me the geology that is important to find gold, but I also began to understand why some areas in AZ are good and some not. Below is a geological map, look at the color patterns in the areas shown on the above map..... 

azgeomap_all400.jpg

Now these are just photos of the geological maps so you do not see that below on the actual map each color represents certain rock and minerals as  well as gravels distributed across Arizona. This has paid well for me in places with no recorded gold production...... Just a tip and look for the areas similar in geology (or just us colors). More to it, but you'll figure it out. That will involve a few 10.00 books to aid in understanding the relationships of these mineras to gold deposits. Arizona Gold Placering, by Maureen Johnson and placer deposits of Arizona by Eldred Wilson :old:

Another informative-source of gold-locations and successful methodologies to attain it is:  ARIZONA'S GOLDEN SECRET or HOW TO GET YOUR SHARE OF DESERT GOLD, by Ronald S. Wielgus (Copyright 1992).

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