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Rod

GPZ Observations

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9 hours ago, DSMITH said:

I still have yet to find one nugget with either detector I have even though the two I do have are not as expensive as those you have I did not purchase them with high expectations in mind for me it is the thrill of the hunt and what the possibilities are if I had gone into detecting with big expectations in my mind I would have never gotten into this hobby like I said its the thrill of the hunt for me because you never know what you are going to dig up thats why I dig every signal I get don't care what target IDs are if its a good repeatable signal I dig

What kind of detectors are you using.  No reason not to find gold unless you are using the wrong kind of detector, or you have not been properly trained to know where and how to look.

And by wrong kind of detector, I mean a detector that is not designed to find gold. 

Doc

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12 hours ago, kwah said:

I love my 2300, still have a love/hate relationship with my 7000 (probably wouldn't have bought it if I knew then what I know now).  I covet a GM 1000, but dam it, if a 2300 and a 7000 won't find them then fug it, I am done with buying detectors.:2mo5pow:

You don't need to buy any more detectors.  If you are not having any luck with the GPZ7000, then something is radically wrong.

If you have ever played golf you will know what I mean by golf being a mental game.  Attitude is everything.  Prospecting is a mental game.  If you do not have confidence in a particular detector, you will get frustrated.  I can tell you if you are being successful with the SDC2300 but not so with the GPZ, barring a detector that is faulty, you just have a lack of confidence in the GPZ7000.

I actually sold my SDC2300 because I feel the GPZ7000 and the Gold Monster 1000 are better for me personally.  But I would never give up my GPZ7000.  That thing is the duck's nutz.

Doc

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11 hours ago, DOC said:

What kind of detectors are you using.  No reason not to find gold unless you are using the wrong kind of detector, or you have not been properly trained to know where and how to look.

And by wrong kind of detector, I mean a detector that is not designed to find gold. 

Doc

Well Doc I only have two a X TERRA 705 an a GM 1000 I have been detecting since 2009  but have only been detecting for gold for just a little while not even a year yet so i am pretty new to that part of my adventure I feel its just a matter of time before I get my coil over a nugget I have found gold before just not in a nugget form I try to soak up everything I can as far as nugget hunting and am always looking for someone to teach me as to how to detect for gold and what indicators to look for  like I said I have found gold before but it was in coin form not nugget.

Was supposed too get some training from Chris Ghoulson when I purchased my GM 1000 from him but that fell through haven't had much time lately to do much of anything 

Edited by DSMITH

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On 12/19/2017 at 11:13 AM, kwah said:

I love my 2300, still have a love/hate relationship with my 7000 (probably wouldn't have bought it if I knew then what I know now).  I covet a GM 1000, but dam it, if a 2300 and a 7000 won't find them then fug it, I am done with buying detectors.:2mo5pow:

Okay, I see how this post can read differently than I intended.  I have found nuggets with both detectors.  Not as many as would like, but who has not said the same.  I agree the 7000 has made the 2300 somewhat redundant.  I think I have enough detectors to find nuggets.  

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I have a gpz and would love to have an sdc for the tight areas.  I dont believe it is redundant at all.  The sdc will find gold the gpz misses.  It misses the gold more cecause of the size and shape than because of the technology.  I bought a gold monster for these area just because it was cheaper.  But I will say there is a bit more of a learning curve with the gpz.  Get past that though and you're golden.

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Christmas is near..if anyone wants to gift me a sdc 2300 just p.m. me.....for that I will generously  share 50/50 of the gold found for 6 months  :4chsmu1:. Personally, I have not had a detector that did't pay for itself, same goes with a gpz.....:brows:.. Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah & Kwanzaa... 

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On 12/19/2017 at 9:57 PM, DOC said:

I'm 5' 7" inches tall.  I have had left shoulder rotator cuff surgery, and 12 months ago I had the head of my radial bone in my right arm cut off and the nerve in my right elbow relocated.  My right arm is my swinging arm.

I swing the GPZ7000 10 hours with not so much as a twinge.  When I take a break it's not because I am worn out, it's only to get a sandwich or a drink, or drive to a new location.

The harness "Pro Swing 45" is an absolute must.  The Swing Assist arm is also another must.  If you don't like it, it is because you do not have it adjusted correctly, and you are trying to use it the way Minelab recommends.

First,  forget about using the "J" rods on both sides and the yoke that goes across your chest.  Only use the "J" rod under the arm you swing with.  In my case that is the right arm.

Second, have someone help you in adjusting the harness correctly.  From the middle of your waist at the back where the rod snaps into the wide belt, adjust that only far enough out that the rod, when it runs under your arm stays very close to your body.  You don't want your arm bumping against  the J rod as you swing.  You want it tight to your body.  When you get that adjustment right, put electrical tape around the adjustment screw so it stays how you adjusted it.

Third.  Where the rod goes up inside the shoulder strap, you want it HIGH!  High enough that it actually lifts the strap off of your shoulder.   When you pull down on the bungee you do not want to feel that strap touching your shoulder no matter how hard you pull.  What you should feel is the weight, being transferred down and under your arm and pushing the wide belt around your back out and away from you.  Basically you will feel no weight at all.  Again when you get this adjusted correctly, electrical tape.  Then also tape the joints on the J rod so they do not pull apart.

I have gone through this with too many customers to count.  "I don't like it."  Really?  Put it on.  What don't you like about it?  Are you right handed or left handed?

I do the adjustments I have just described and 100% of the time the response has been, "Holy crap, what a difference, the GPZ weighs nothing now."  I had a customer that I sent his GPZ to him in California, he said he could only swing for 2 hours at a time.  Once he got over to Las Vegas to go out for his training I rigged him right.  He swung for 8 hours that day, only stopping for lunch.  Zero problems.

Trust me, if you don't like it, it is only because it has not been adjusted correctly, or you are trying to use that YOKE system across the front of your chest, which to my way of thinking is worthless and cumbersome.

Doc

 

The real reason I don't like the harness is, that as a piece of gear, the harness does not logistically work for me :idunno: I can't wear the harness and my backpack at the same time. The harness cannot hold the items that I require to be in my backpack: water, headlamp, Leatherman, fire starter, snacks, sample bags, binoculars, whistle, extra magazine full of bullets :cowboypistol:, extra battery, etc. And I don't desire to carry both a harness and my backpack all day. This week a few friends and I camped out and hunted for a couple of days. The old bungee worked great as always :) Now if Minelab built a quality, decent sized backpack with the harness built in, that might be the ticket :idea:

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Yep at 61 now I had the same delema so butchered the camel pack and attached it to my harness.... Got my stuff and harness so my old wore out shoulder doesn't hurt so much. Love shallow areas now because my 1000 is just a couple pounds :old:

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8 minutes ago, Bill Southern said:

Yep at 61 now I had the same delema so butchered the camel pack and attached it to my harness.... Got my stuff and harness so my old wore out shoulder doesn't hurt so much. Love shallow areas now because my 1000 is just a couple pounds :old:

That's a great idea Bill, combine the harness and the backpack into a new piece of multipurpose gear. Might experiment with that and an old camel pack that I don't use any longer :)

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Bill and others, I did the same, I ended up putting my camelback backpack on top of the minelab harness, to have the support for the detector, and the water and toilet paper for me :D.

Dave

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22 hours ago, Rod said:

Now if Minelab built a quality, decent sized backpack with the harness built in, that might be the ticket

I would be interested in that as well! It would also have to include the ability to have a bladder for my iced water! i currently use a Camelbak system ... doesn't hold much more than a first aid kit, a snack or two, couple of dog biscuits for Max and some firestart material. it has a good sized rugged ... so far hasn't broken even when used with the GPZ7000 ... D-ring on each shoulder strap. I would like to be able to carry slightly more especially when a fair distance from my RZR or truck.

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21 hours ago, fredmason said:

I did that with an older Minelab harness...sewed a larger pack on to the harness; also used some plastic wire ties...works for me.

fred

Fred is that what you did with the pack you got from me a couple or three years ago? Just curious.

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YES.

BTW; you can do something similar with a ruck-sack or small canvas pack with straps (military surplus) .

Just cross the straps on the harness....for those days when you want to carry extra stuff.

If anyone is interested I could post some pics of my various oddball ideas....

fred

Edited by fredmason
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I for one would be interested to see what you did ... Thanks for offering!

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On 12/20/2017 at 11:31 AM, DSMITH said:

Well Doc I only have two a X TERRA 705 an a GM 1000 I have been detecting since 2009  but have only been detecting for gold for just a little while not even a year yet so i am pretty new to that part of my adventure I feel its just a matter of time before I get my coil over a nugget I have found gold before just not in a nugget form I try to soak up everything I can as far as nugget hunting and am always looking for someone to teach me as to how to detect for gold and what indicators to look for  like I said I have found gold before but it was in coin form not nugget.

DSMITH: Help in the field is nice, but it is not necessary.  There is a way to teach yourself.  Especially if, like you, a person has spent several years coinshooting or relic hunting at beaches or parks.  This is so because the beach and park type hunting virtually NEVER involves experience with soft, whispery signals that barely break the threshold.  The vast experience is with crisp, almost booming responses.  Shifting gears to nugget shooting requires attention to the subtle tones.  Best way to do this on your own is to prepare some "lodestar" practice chips -- literally plastic poker chips that each have a carefully pre-weighed gold nugget epoxied to it with the weight etched onto the chip for ease of reference.  Make sure at least one of these is so small it is barely audible to your detector.  Run this drill many times by first clearing a patch of all junk and then burying the poker chips an inch to two deep.  Keep re-burying the chips a little deeper each time.  Don't worry about losing your chips.  they are big, colored items that you easily can rake up if you don't detect them all.  Soon your ear will begin to perk at the scratchy outer limits of what your detectors enable you to "hear".  I'm not saying to ignore the big boomers.  They mostly will consist of bottle tops or bullets and only once in a long while will they reveal a large nugget.  But the meat and potatoes of a consistent nugget shooter requires an ability to recognize and dig the subtlest of signals.  If you only dig the boomers you are missing the lion's share of the nuggets that either are too small or too deep -- just at the edge of your detector's response range.  Good luck.  Let us know how you do after trying this.  After finally losing your "nugget virginity" in the field without anyone else's assistance you likely will find that suddenly you are finding more and more with a righteous feeling of self-earned respect.

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On 12/31/2017 at 11:07 PM, Micro Nugget said:

DSMITH: Help in the field is nice, but it is not necessary.  There is a way to teach yourself.  Especially if, like you, a person has spent several years coinshooting or relic hunting at beaches or parks.  This is so because the beach and park type hunting virtually NEVER involves experience with soft, whispery signals that barely break the threshold.  The vast experience is with crisp, almost booming responses.  Shifting gears to nugget shooting requires attention to the subtle tones.  Best way to do this on your own is to prepare some "lodestar" practice chips -- literally plastic poker chips that each have a carefully pre-weighed gold nugget epoxied to it with the weight etched onto the chip for ease of reference.  Make sure at least one of these is so small it is barely audible to your detector.  Run this drill many times by first clearing a patch of all junk and then burying the poker chips an inch to two deep.  Keep re-burying the chips a little deeper each time.  Don't worry about losing your chips.  they are big, colored items that you easily can rake up if you don't detect them all.  Soon your ear will begin to perk at the scratchy outer limits of what your detectors enable you to "hear".  I'm not saying to ignore the big boomers.  They mostly will consist of bottle tops or bullets and only once in a long while will they reveal a large nugget.  But the meat and potatoes of a consistent nugget shooter requires an ability to recognize and dig the subtlest of signals.  If you only dig the boomers you are missing the lion's share of the nuggets that either are too small or too deep -- just at the edge of your detector's response range.  Good luck.  Let us know how you do after trying this.  After finally losing your "nugget virginity" in the field without anyone else's assistance you likely will find that suddenly you are finding more and more with a righteous feeling of self-earned respect.

thank you for the info Micro Nugget now I just have to find where I can purchase some small nugs to experiment with greatly appreciated

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