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Near UV Flash Light

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Posted (edited)

Homey I don't know what the watts or lumens are on it? Its bright.

AzNuggetBob

Edited by AzNuggetBob

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1 hour ago, AzNuggetBob said:

This is what I use. I modded it a bit. it used to use a big ol drop in carbon 12V battery. I wired it with a 4' extension wire so I could use rechargeable gel cells on my nugget hunting belt. takes all the weight off your arm and lasts all nite. the aluminum cap on the front snaps off and you move it the top or bottom for long wave or short wave. it also has a small bulb on top is for a standard flash light so you can see where your walking. I'm thinking about changing it to a camcorder battery but I don't know if it will last all nite. It uses one of those long standard florescent bulbs with specialized glass lens. Its old school but works great. I got it on ebay for about $20.00  It will light up rocks and critters for about twenty yards.  your not going to get that out of a little pocket flashlight. Its a real light show on a dark nite and its found me a lot of purddy rocks and gem stones.  its also a nice switch from nugget hunting at nite.
AzNuggetBob

 

gem light 001.JPG

gem light 002.JPG

gem light 003.JPG

That's quite a great deal. I'm in the market for a used longwave -shortwave uv lamp like that myself. Have been scouring eBay with no success so far. One of these days I'll find something.

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4 hours ago, AzNuggetBob said:

This is what I use. I modded it a bit. it used to use a big ol drop in carbon 12V battery. I wired it with a 4' extension wire so I could use rechargeable gel cells on my nugget hunting belt. takes all the weight off your arm and lasts all nite. the aluminum cap on the front snaps off and you move it the top or bottom for long wave or short wave. it also has a small bulb on top is for a standard flash light so you can see where your walking. I'm thinking about changing it to a camcorder battery but I don't know if it will last all nite. It uses one of those long standard florescent bulbs with specialized glass lens. Its old school but works great. I got it on ebay for about $20.00  It will light up rocks and critters for about twenty yards.  your not going to get that out of a little pocket flashlight. Its a real light show on a dark nite and its found me a lot of purddy rocks and gem stones.  its also a nice switch from nugget hunting at nite.
AzNuggetBob

 

gem light 001.JPG

gem light 002.JPG

gem light 003.JPG

I've got one of the Way Too Cool dual 18watt units. Much like yours. At one point I even mounted it on a long handle like a detector, but it wears me out using it that way, even with a support cord. I run it with a pair of NICAD battery packs. Each one uses 10 'D' cells. With both the LW & SW bulbs on, it will run about 2 hours on each pack.

 

P5150001.JPG

P5150002.JPG

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Posted (edited)

Cool Jim I was thinking about putting a crash guard on the front of mine. Ive already dropped it a couple times and Im thinking if I break the lens glass they may be hard to find. 

Also Morlock If you can find the lens glass you could make one out of a plain o'l fluorescent flashlight.

BTW Jim are you trying to light up the country side with that thing. :yesss:

 

AzNuggetBob

Edited by AzNuggetBob

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Homey I dont know if you could do the same thing with the same results with those new LED's, Maybe. if you stacked up a bunch of them side by side and possibly with a lot less battery?. AzNuggetBob

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9 hours ago, AzNuggetBob said:

Cool Jim I was thinking about putting a crash guard on the front of mine. Ive already dropped it a couple times and Im thinking if I break the lens glass they may be hard to find. 

Also Morlock If you can find the lens glass you could make one out of a plain o'l fluorescent flashlight.

BTW Jim are you trying to light up the country side with that thing. :yesss:

 

AzNuggetBob

It is BRIGHT, especially with both bulbs on. I had the idea to use it for diamond prospecting in Wyoming. I thought I'd need lots of light as diamonds are so small. Found out western Wyoming is loaded with fluorescent material, and it's hard to separate everything. I've also got one of the little LED flashlights that works pretty good for checking found material for fluorescence, but it's not much help for general scanning. Way Too Cool also sells a pretty powerful LED flashlight, but it costs about $80. The real cost in all this stuff is the filters. The cheap LED lights have lousy filters, and allow a lot of white light through, dimming the fluorescence.

Jim

 

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Yea the LED are good these days but not as good as the old bulbs.  Didn't think about filters.  I'll have a look see what's out there.    The Near UV around 400nM is not as hot on some minerals but still useful and CHEAP !    People think LED are power savers but in fact what they don't need in Voltage the SUCK YOU DRY in current to produce any real amount of light. 

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Homey, for my use an LED would have worked well enough. Especially one of the Way Too Cool LED's. But, they didn't have them when I bought mine. Most gemstones fluoresce under LW, so the LED works good for that. For general mineral fluorescence, the SW is better. It's like detectors...depends on the ground, and what you're trying to find.

Jim

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On 5/16/2018 at 6:58 AM, homefire said:

Yea the LED are good these days but not as good as the old bulbs.  Didn't think about filters.  I'll have a look see what's out there.    The Near UV around 400nM is not as hot on some minerals but still useful and CHEAP !    People think LED are power savers but in fact what they don't need in Voltage the SUCK YOU DRY in current to produce any real amount of light. 

I looked into a making a SW lamp. Whew! The 9watt uvc germicidal bulbs in a 13w fluorescent work light was doable and cheap...the filter was not! A Hoya U-325c  seems to be the highest regarded filter glass out there and I finally found some for sale at a low low price of $132.00 for a 2"x 5.5" piece. :yikes:

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Yes, Dave, that's why the big units are so spendy. And, to top it off, the filters have a finite life. I don't remember how many hours of use you get...used to know all that stuff, but now I'm old.

Jim

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Yep, UV Radiation is sorta the bridge between Light Waves and Light Partials (PHOTONS).   UV has the ability to rattle things around at the Atomic Levels and Mess Stuff Up.   

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21 hours ago, ArcticDave said:

I looked into a making a SW lamp. Whew! The 9watt uvc germicidal bulbs in a 13w fluorescent work light was doable and cheap...the filter was not! A Hoya U-325c  seems to be the highest regarded filter glass out there and I finally found some for sale at a low low price of $132.00 for a 2"x 5.5" piece. :yikes:

Dave that sounds close to my lens. now I know I'm putting a crash guard on mine. :hide::D

AzNuggetBob

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For that kind of money, I would too Bob!

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On 5/29/2018 at 7:10 AM, Idaho Jim said:

Yes, Dave, that's why the big units are so spendy. And, to top it off, the filters have a finite life. I don't remember how many hours of use you get...used to know all that stuff, but now I'm old.

Jim

Jim  I opened up my UV light today just to check it out and was thinking about getting a spare bulb. just in case it went out on me out in the hills. I noticed the top half of the bulb is coated with something? looks almost like clear crystals? Is that the filter you were referring to that doesn't last?. mine is starting to flake off the bulb. and the new UV bulbs I looked at don't have it? Its a mystery to me and would appreciate any info you have on them.
AzNuggetBob

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2 hours ago, AzNuggetBob said:

Jim  I opened up my UV light today just to check it out and was thinking about getting a spare bulb. just in case it went out on me out in the hills. I noticed the top half of the bulb is coated with something? looks almost like clear crystals? Is that the filter you were referring to that doesn't last?. mine is starting to flake off the bulb. and the new UV bulbs I looked at don't have it? Its a mystery to me and would appreciate any info you have on them.
AzNuggetBob

Bob, I don't have a clue. My understanding is the filter is the black-looking flat lens the bulb shines through. (it's actually deep red). The filter blocks white light, so the fluorescence shows up better. I think the exterior of the bulbs is some sort of quartz. I also seem to remember something about regular glass blocking UV light...that's why the quartz bulb, rather than glass. It may be you're seeing some quartz crystals in the bulb, but I don't know. I'll do little digging (no pun intended), and see what i can find out.

Jim

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Posted (edited)

It may be that one of your bulbs is short wave UV, and uses a quartz bulb. here's a quote from another site linked below.

UV lights

Fluorescent Blacklights

There are fluorescent tubes that emit UV. The phosphor coating on the inner surface of the tube absorbs the UVC emitted by the low pressure mercury arc, and emits longer UV wavelengths. There are at least six different UV-emitting phosphors used in fluorescent lamps.

One common lamp is the ""BLB" fluorescent lamp. The tubing is made from a very deep violet-blue glass known as "Wood's glass". The tubing is quite transparent to medium and longer UVA wavelengths, and shorter visible violet wavelengths, and a fairly broad range of infrared and the longest, least visible red wavelengths. These tubes emit lots of UV mainly between 350 and 375 nanometers, some of the 404.7 and dimmer 407.8 nM violet mercury lines, and just enough of the blue 435.8 nM mercury line to have a basically blue color when lit.
The "BLB" lamps are used for special effects due to their ability to make fluorescent objects glow very brightly.

There is a less common deep-blue-violet lamp with no phosphor and made with special glass (maybe quartz) to transmit the 253.7 nM UVC (shortwave UV) mercury line. These lamps are generally used to make fluorescent rocks glow.

There are UV fluorescent lamps with glass not dyed to block visible light. This includes the BL and the similar 350BL. These are often used to attract insects into electric insect killers. The 350BL has a broader spectrum peaking at a slightly shorter wavelength (350 nanometers) than the BL does, and is supposedly more attractive to insects than the BL.

There are other ultraviolet lamps such as UVB medicinal lamps and UVA suntanning lamps.

There are also the similar fluorescent actinic lamps, producing long UV wavelengths and/or visible violet. These are sometimes used in some special photographic and printing processes. One of these is the 03, specializing in producing visible violet light. The 03 is also used in reef aquariums with live coral since coral utilizes violet and deep blue wavelengths. The 03 actinic will cause fluorescence of most fluorescent dyes, pigments and paints, especially other than ones which fluoresce blue.

Edited by Idaho Jim
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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Idaho Jim said:

It may be that one of your bulbs is short wave UV, and uses a quartz bulb. here's a quote from another site linked below.

UV lights

Fluorescent Blacklights

There are fluorescent tubes that emit UV. The phosphor coating on the inner surface of the tube absorbs the UVC emitted by the low pressure mercury arc, and emits longer UV wavelengths. There are at least six different UV-emitting phosphors used in fluorescent lamps.

One common lamp is the ""BLB" fluorescent lamp. The tubing is made from a very deep violet-blue glass known as "Wood's glass". The tubing is quite transparent to medium and longer UVA wavelengths, and shorter visible violet wavelengths, and a fairly broad range of infrared and the longest, least visible red wavelengths. These tubes emit lots of UV mainly between 350 and 375 nanometers, some of the 404.7 and dimmer 407.8 nM violet mercury lines, and just enough of the blue 435.8 nM mercury line to have a basically blue color when lit.
The "BLB" lamps are used for special effects due to their ability to make fluorescent objects glow very brightly.

There is a less common deep-blue-violet lamp with no phosphor and made with special glass (maybe quartz) to transmit the 253.7 nM UVC (shortwave UV) mercury line. These lamps are generally used to make fluorescent rocks glow.

There are UV fluorescent lamps with glass not dyed to block visible light. This includes the BL and the similar 350BL. These are often used to attract insects into electric insect killers. The 350BL has a broader spectrum peaking at a slightly shorter wavelength (350 nanometers) than the BL does, and is supposedly more attractive to insects than the BL.

There are other ultraviolet lamps such as UVB medicinal lamps and UVA suntanning lamps.

There are also the similar fluorescent actinic lamps, producing long UV wavelengths and/or visible violet. These are sometimes used in some special photographic and printing processes. One of these is the 03, specializing in producing visible violet light. The 03 is also used in reef aquariums with live coral since coral utilizes violet and deep blue wavelengths. The 03 actinic will cause fluorescence of most fluorescent dyes, pigments and paints, especially other than ones which fluoresce blue.

Thanks Jim  a lot of great info in your posts.

AzNuggetBob

Edited by AzNuggetBob

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Posted (edited)

I took a photo of it. there is nothing on the bulb but made in Japan. hopefully I can get it figured out with your info. its more like a frosting coating on the glass? its a dual filament bulb.

AzNuggetBob

miner light 001.JPG

Edited by AzNuggetBob

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I'm thinking it's using a single bulb to do both SW and LW UV. I'm not sure which portion of the bulb is which, but I'd bet that's what's going on. As mentioned in that quote above, the SW is filtered out by the phosphor coating, so the upper portion of the bulb in your pic is probably the Long Wave emitter, and the lower, uncoated portion is the Shortwave emitter. In mine, I have separate bulbs, and can turn them on and off individually. Shortwave is UV/C. Longwave is UV/A.

Jim

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On 6/2/2018 at 8:27 AM, Idaho Jim said:

I'm thinking it's using a single bulb to do both SW and LW UV. I'm not sure which portion of the bulb is which, but I'd bet that's what's going on. As mentioned in that quote above, the SW is filtered out by the phosphor coating, so the upper portion of the bulb in your pic is probably the Long Wave emitter, and the lower, uncoated portion is the Shortwave emitter. In mine, I have separate bulbs, and can turn them on and off individually. Shortwave is UV/C. Longwave is UV/A.

Jim

I think you nailed it Jim, everything you have been saying sounds like my light. The top is the longwave. Thats the way it has always worked for me. I'm pretty sure its a mercury vaper bulb too. I can see droplets of mercury rolling around in the bulb.

AzNuggetBob

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Bob, how far out in front of you will your lamp still cause specimens to fluoresce?  Can you walk along with a lamp like yours scanning the ground as you go, or do you still have to get the rock close to see the fluorescence?

 

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Dave  Its depends on what type of minerals. some fluoress brighter than others. But my light starts lighting things up at about 20 yards on a dark night. almost no moon. AzNuggetBob

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41 minutes ago, AzNuggetBob said:

Dave  Its depends on what type of minerals. some fluoress brighter than others. But my light starts lighting things up at about 20 yards on a dark night. almost no moon. AzNuggetBob

From my experience, short wave gives much better results then long wave. I don't know if it's because a lot more minerals flouresce under short wave or what. Short wave seems brighter. Long wave seems duller in most cases.

I wish I had an inexpensive battery operated short-long wave lamp like you have.

 

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Morlock again it depends on what minerals your searching for. High or low depends on the type of minerals you are looking for. AzNuggetBob

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2 hours ago, AzNuggetBob said:

Dave  Its depends on what type of minerals. some fluoress brighter than others. But my light starts lighting things up at about 20 yards on a dark night. almost no moon. AzNuggetBob

Ah okay...that is further than I thought. I can see a moonless night being the best.

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