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Bill's Bees.... Honeybees that is.

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17 minutes ago, Relichunter2016 said:

My uncle uses bee sting therapy, if you have arthritis place a few bees on the area and let them sting you. Keep the stinger in for a minute or two. Your arthritis will be gone for a while....repeat as necessary.  The thing is you have to have bees and not be allergic to them,. 

 I'll have to pass on that...Uncle Rons "tart cherry juice" therapy works for me...

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4 hours ago, middleforkminer2 said:

 I'll have to pass on that...Uncle Rons "tart cherry juice" therapy works for me...

Lol.............good stuff Cherry juice....dang expensive !! My Uncle is a major tightwad....explains his bee therapy.  :idunno:

 

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I substituted Cran Berry juice and that's hard to find any more.   It's all cocktail. 

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Not the same antioxidents in cranberry as must be Montgomery black to have the needed concentrations BUT cranberry righteous for kidneys. I eat yogurt laced with walnuts(omega 3 more than salmon) cranberries and tart cherries(Costco the best, freshest, cheapest by far dehydrated) as helped me through my year long fight with Hep C 2b and after 16 years definitely addicted. Cool anyhow as just caring enough to try has a placebo effect and at my age I'll try quite a few things EXCEPT mega vitamins will kill ya...-John

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It does indeed work on arthritis in my hands, stings do not bother me much and face is back to my normal ugly now

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1 hour ago, Hoser John said:

Not the same antioxidents in cranberry as must be Montgomery black to have the needed concentrations BUT cranberry righteous for kidneys. I eat yogurt laced with walnuts(omega 3 more than salmon) cranberries and tart cherries(Costco the best, freshest, cheapest by far dehydrated) as helped me through my year long fight with Hep C 2b and after 16 years definitely addicted. Cool anyhow as just caring enough to try has a placebo effect and at my age I'll try quite a few things EXCEPT mega vitamins will kill ya...-John

 "The placebo effect" doesn't work for me....I'd tried just about every home remedy I could for arthritis...when I first tried the juice, I was more than a little skeptical.  If the cherry juice stops working, I'll try the bee sting thing....one question though....how do I get them to sting specific areas? 

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Middlefork,

 

You have to grab them by the wings and just place them on the area of the pain. He did like 1-2 on his elbows and knees, people who used bee venom reported fewer swollen joints, tender joints, and less morning stiffness than those who were given a placebo.This bee venom therapy has been used for centuries in other countries. We in the west have finally jumped on board and have done studies and  those studies have proven it does help with arthritis. I bet some therapist somewhere in the States call it Bee Acupuncture ....I Am sure there's stuff on the internet on it...

Edited by Relichunter2016
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Fantastic report in this months National Geographic(I know I know eco bs but pertinent info source as read over 60 years) about pain, placebo effects and treatments. Click your ruby slippers Dorothy and away goes the pain EVEN when you know it's a placebo...as always not all folks ,but most, as brain scans prove. Educate and prosper. Tried the bee stings and no help to me but chow down that honey in coffee/cereal everyday. Gods gift to man...just my take-John

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Honey is great stuff....but like the other posts say, not all honey is created equal...the lady whose property I live on, knows how much I love the stuff, so she brought me a bottle of "Gourmet Honey"....I cracked it open & tasted it and couldn't believe how nasty it tasted....so I turned the jar over and started reading...it turns out that this stuff comes from any one of a dozen southeast asia countries...I ended up throwing the rest out...we have a local producer that has hives scattered all up and down the Sacramento and San Joaquin valley and foothills...he has wildflower,  orange blossom and clover...clover's my favorite, but the orange blossom is pretty tasty too, with an actual hint of orange.  I go through about one 12 oz. jar a month.

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On 12/15/2016 at 8:06 AM, Relichunter2016 said:

Middlefork,

 

You have to grab them by the wings and just place them on the area of the pain.

I'm probably not talented enough to grab em by the wings...pretty sure I'd get the tips of my fingers stung and no arthritis there.

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5 hours ago, middleforkminer2 said:

I'm probably not talented enough to grab em by the wings...pretty sure I'd get the tips of my fingers stung and no arthritis there.

Use tweezers.

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Small jar and tweezers do the job well. The Ruskies use a electroplate at the landing zone in front of the hive and when the little bugger lands she gets a small electric charge and automatically deposits some venom on he plate. They collect the plate at the end of the day scrape off the venom and market it. Of course it's mixed with a fluid and injected with a hypo. Old Tom

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On 10/10/2016 at 9:55 AM, weaver hillbille said:

 Speaking of "guard bees" , we had a swarm  settle in, one day, on a Pigeon Pea bush about waist high, in our garden.  

The guards were hitting me  from over 50 feet away. Just a little unsettling ,and no keeper would come get them, so they succumbed to  a cold  hose shower after sundown , followed by a soapy water spray.

  I've been much closer to swarms before and never had guard bees be agressive at all... Maybe these were a bit "africanny":idunno:

Did it look kind of like a pineapple but moving? Cause I hate those when they are on one of my rentals, (Pest Control and our Bee guy say they cant touch them if they are outside, will be gone in 24 hours, but the tenants still want to sue you)

Using power tools around swarms like this, I find they are definitely easier to excite, and was told that often depending on the time of the year these are Africanised bees that split their hives multiple times a year as opposed to standard ones.

Not sure if he was pulling my leg or not, but he sure was right about not messing with the ones when found in a water meter box, been chased to my truck, stung to hell and back more than once for just pulling the lid off.

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9 hours ago, Desertson said:

Did it look kind of like a pineapple but moving? ...not messing with the ones when found in a water meter box, been chased to my truck, stung to hell and back more than once for just pulling the lid off.

 No, just looked like a small  swwarm about the size of a nerf football.  Cold, soapy water, after dusk ,got it and the water meter swarm.

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Last organic farmers market was yesterday so 3 quartz of wildflower honey and 5 lbs of fresh organic walnutz and that'll keep me for a few months....if I slow down hahaha-john

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Yes Africanized Honeybees will swarm several times a year to form sister colonies and it is part of the reason they do so well. They are not as evil as one thinks and can be managed and are many places here and abroad with some adjustments to their temperament. Perhaps nature is making some changes to help survival in these times? Natures Way?

 

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OMG ya gotta have bign's to do that....no thanks i'll just support my local friendly bee keepers. John

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31 minutes ago, Hoser John said:

OMG ya gotta have bign's to do that....no thanks i'll just support my local friendly bee keepers. John

 NO, I think just confidence that if you're not fearful- they won't be( defensive)- fine line, there, to be sure between no fear and ignorance.

 YOU get what you give,so to speak.

 Insects can "smell" (with their antenna) changes in body chemistry.  If fearful, adrenaline/noradrenaline/sweat/other pheromones is pumping and breathing rate increased( CO2  attracts bees). Body movements are jerky( not smooth and slow)... All are instigators of potential for attack.

 Exhale on a bee, wear perfume,wash bee suit/ other clothing  in a scented detergent/use a  detergent with UV brighteners, wear  a flowery shirt( that's not a human it's a flower:89:), black( some say it antagonizes them), or red clothing ( they can't see), knitted/fuzzy clothing( they could get tangled up in) at your peril.

Edited by weaver hillbille
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Here's a beekeepers viewpoint on that video.  The queen determines the temperament of the hive.  If she is a bitch then the hive will be a nasty one.  But if the queen is a mild tempered one the hive will accept much more interference than usual.  The same rule is in the Africanized community.  I am sure that this beekeeper picked a mild tempered queen to show his skills off in front of the camera.  I am sure that if he had picked one of his more aggressive hives he wouldn't have taken off his veil.  I had hives through the years of Italian domestics that you wouldn't dare take off your veil while working.  I still say that this guy has big cohunes to be fooling around with the Africanized version like he is.  But if we don't experiment with this dilemma then we won't ever get out of it.      

  Old Tom                

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My bud Bob(RIP) had a huge old black bumble bee that lived in his rock barbq base. You sit down and he'd immediately buzz out and you exhaled softly, as he was up in your face, and he go back to his hole for years. Ended up with 2 there but house sold. Amazing how huge it was as a mere couple of inches from your face and details amazing. Seen him deal with trespassers and you did NOT want to be one of them. Bees make the world alive and beautiful but I always procede with caution and never feared but respected is the order of the day-John

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On 12/21/2016 at 7:00 AM, Hoser John said:

. Bees make the world alive and beautiful but I always procede with caution and never feared but respected is the order of the day-John

 I try a similar approach in the garden -filling my head with thoughts of all the flowering plants I am growing/will grow for "them".     :idunno: Never hurts to saay ,'hi', and thank them personally, too ,as they flit around pollinating stuff.  I've read that bumbles are quite valuable as pollinators.

      I think the US keepers should plant Tea Tree and get  on the Manuka honey craze. Crazy prices for the stuff compared to regular.  It's akin to

PArmagianno Regiano(cheese)  of the honey world.  Tea trees are quite easy to grow  but they do need consistent water in  a desert climate. 

antibacterial Manuka honey

Tea Tree, Manuka Melaleuca alternifolia      

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Great links but my hot climate would mean death...thanx much-John

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OMG can't hit like on that story as I absolutely hate it. This old world is sic sic sic sic fulla some real wackos. thanx for the ungodly eye opener Bill....so much for the peaceful quiet sweet world of bee hives...John

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