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ArcticDave

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We have had an inordinate amount of rain this summer along with the winds from the big storm cells. Along with all that rain comes the humidity...add in some record high temps too. It's a lovely stew o' weather :arrowheadsmiley:

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Posted (edited)

We don't have the really hot weather like AZ does, but it has been plenty steamy here. A fellow told me the other day that we were on track to top 60 days over 100 degrees this summer and that would be a record. (I don't know if he knew what he was talking about but he certainly spoke with authority in his voice. It musta been true). I can remember a couple summers where Las Cruces did not even get to 100 degrees and you got cold every time you went swimming. It has been 100 degrees or more almost every day for about 8 weeks now and what little water there is, is as warm as bathwater.

The overall temperature profile is different this year too. Most summers it does not get hot until 3:30 or so and by 9:00 p.m. it is down to 85 degrees. It will only be triple digits for a few hours. This year it gets hot early and stays hot late. The miserability factor is high this year. It has not been more than 107 or so but it does not cool off at night like it is supposed to. It is much more like the Sonoran desert these days than the Chihuahuan desert.

I am sleeping in a sweet hammock made out of parachute cloth. The air flows around you and it is really cool sleeping. I think it is the only thing that has made this summer bearable as far as the heat is concerned. I wake up chilly and get a blanket every night in the hammock. If I am laying on the bed I flop around in a puddle of sweat until midnight. 

Edited by Bedrock Bob

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A nice summer property in the White Mountains always sounds great this time of year. 

We have had a abnormally high dew point for several weeks now. We usually cool off substantially at night too, but I think the extra moisture in the air acts like a blanket. :sickbyc:

I never was comfortable in a hammock. They're great for a nap in the shade, but hurt my back if I stay all night in one.

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I know off topic but I spent many a night in my jungle hammock hanging up in the trees. didn't help my back either. but it was stealthy.:200:

AzNuggetBob

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Ya know Dave now that I think about it. Hammocks fold up real small and lightweight. may be the way to go in your prospecting airplane. and I'll tell ya I learned early on, anything is better than sleeping on the ground.

AzNuggetBob

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Dave I'll give you another little secret. you may be thinking, ok how do I hang a hammock with no tree's, just ad two small wooden wedges. you can pound the rope into a crack in bedrock cliffs or boulders. worked for me. AzNuggetBob

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3 hours ago, AzNuggetBob said:

Ya know Dave now that I think about it. Hammocks fold up real small and lightweight. may be the way to go in your prospecting airplane. and I'll tell ya I learned early on, anything is better than sleeping on the ground.

AzNuggetBob

I hear that! I know what creepy crawlies are out there, and I have no desire to share a bedroll with any of them.

A hammock in both the plane and the buggy would be a good idea. They don't take up much space. They also could save a fellow the joy of waking up and discovering himself spooning a less than friendly Crotalus. :yikes:

The wedge idea is a good one. :thumbsupanim

I figure one end could be tied off to a vehicle. You just have to hunt for a single tie down to park against.

 

 

 

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The secret to the hammock is getting the "hang" just right. It needs to be loose so you can lay flat and spread out.

Most hammocks of days gone by were mighty uncomfortable. Thy were way too small. They were usually hung way too tight. And sometimes they had spreader sticks in them and that is just sick and wrong... a recipe for uncomfortable sleep and flipping over. But the modern high quality hammocks are superb. You sleep flat, they will not flip or turn over and they are large enough you can even sleep on your side or curled up. 

They make several good hammocks designed to sleep in. I have a really bad back and I did not think a hammock was going to work for me. But I tried a high quality camping hammock and now I have it hung over my bed at the house. I sleep in it almost every night. 

Finding anchor points for the hammock is easy. I only need one anchor about eye level. I park the truck an appropriate distance away from it and use the headache rack. If there are absolutely no trees at all I let the tailgate down and anchor to the bow of the boat. The hammock hangs over the bed of the truck. You can buy a set of poles and guy outs that allow you to sleep in barren terrain, or you can just use a fence post. Once you stop thinking trees and start thinking anchor point the hammock is no problem. You might be able to figure out how to anchor a hammock below the wing on your plane and throw the fly over it. 

I have a rain fly that makes a little pup tent over the hammock and a sweet bug net. It keeps me and my gear totally dry and completely covered for insects. The hammock and fly replaces my tent, ground cloth and sleeping pad. I can hold them in one hand and they weigh a small fraction of what my usual sleeping gear weighs. If they get wet they dry like lightning. The ONLY down side I can see is the hammock is chilly in the cooler months. You can easily sleep cool in hot weather but it is difficult to keep warm below about 75 degrees. You need an underquilt to sleep comfortably. I generally switch to my pad and bag in the fall and start pitching my tent to sleep. I still hang my hammock though to take a siesta in the afternoon and to stow my gear up off the ground.

Here is the outfit I bought my hammock from. There are several that make good hammocks but these folks are awesome. No matter what your past experience is with hammocks you will love their product. It took a few nights to figure out how to hang the hammock and lay in it, but once I figured it out I sleep great. And the gear is super quality. I highly recommend them.

https://www.treklightgear.com/

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My experience with hammocks has been minimal...and limited to cheap crap. The net ones just suck.  Too loose and you're smelling your feet, and if you get them tight enough to lie reasonably flat-ish, it makes a high spot in the middle that'll toss you off in a flash. :2mo5pow:

Hammocks were not that practical back in Alaska. As you said BB, they are just too cold. Maybe a solid hammock with a foam pad thrown on it would work in cooler weather.

Thanks for the link! I'll check them out now.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Hammocks are NON CONDUCIVE with my Dead Bug Sleeping Style.

Edited by homefire
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Posted (edited)

Dave,

Hang them loose and lay at about a 15 degree angle (not straight along the centerline). You will lay flat, be able to spread out, turn over or curl up. I use a small pillow under a shoulder to stabilize my head and neck. Best sleep I have ever had.

The net hammocks are a PIA. They cut off circulation and "things" poke through the net and get caught (ever gill net a testicle right before your hammock flips?). They are always too narrow. I use one hung in a tree to cool elk meat. They are not good for anything else. A hammock with sticks as spreaders is worthless. All those sticks do is cause it to flip over and force your body into a banana shape. You simply cant lay at a diagonal to get that flat spot. 

These hammocks are 10 feet long and about 7 feet wide. Just like the ones in South America only made of parachute cloth. They come in awesome color schemes and have a stuff sack sewn right into them. I fabricated some tree straps from old seat belt material so I can adjust the "hang" and get it perfect. I got the perfect angle figured out at home and tied a ridge line across so I can duplicate the proper hang just by looking at the tension on the ridge chord. I can tell immediately if I need to add or take up some slack in my tree straps. 

Too tight or too loose and you don't sleep flat. That sweet spot where you can stretch out gets smaller as you deviate from the perfect tension. Too tight or loose and when you relax your body it twists a bit and your back gets a kink. But when the hang is just right you can get comfortable in just about any position. It is all in getting the proper distance between the ends of the hammock. A line tied as a chord between the ends insures you get this angle right wherever you hang the hammock. And it also provides a ridge line for your bug net and fly. 

I thought I knew every trick in the book when it came to surviving outdoors. Then I revisited the hammock and realized I was simply wrong about them. I knew half the worlds population slept in a hammock but I never stopped to figure out how or why. Just like the guy that "improved" the hammock by putting sticks at the end or laying straight in one, I really had no idea how they worked. I was making assumptions based on what I "knew" and I was simply wrong. Then I got some good advice. I got a quality hammock designed for sleeping, hung it looser than I thought it needed to be and experimented a bit. It turns out that half the worlds population is not as stupid as I assumed and I did not really know a thing about hammocks even though I had formed an opinion on them.

Now that hammock is my best piece of camping gear. If I forgot it I would turn around and drive a hundred miles back to get it. That is what an important piece of gear it has become for me!

Edited by Bedrock Bob
Just hanging around
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I checked out the Treklight site. They have some some really nice gear. I read the same thing that you said about sleeping at an angle. I didn't know that:89:

I was doing it wrong too...

I will give them a shot again when I can afford to buy a good one. :)

 

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Isn't that thing wicked? :droolin:

I saw it the other day on the EAA page.

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Just to put that into perspective....

The PT-6 engine he used in that plane originally sold for over $800,000.00!

A rebuilt one is between $250,000-295,000 :WOW:

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Posted (edited)
24 minutes ago, ArcticDave said:

Just to put that into perspective....

The PT-6 engine he used in that plane originally sold for over $800,000.00!

A rebuilt one is between $250,000-295,000 :WOW:

A thousand plus horsepower! That is about $300 for each pony and that is a value! If you had money like that to spend, that would be a neat way to spend it!

That is one of those bass ackwards turboprops that will suck your socks thru the holes in the firewall isn't it? I think that is the same engine my uncle had on his rally plane back in the day. He could stand that plane on its tail and fly straight up a half mile like a missile. It would sit there in mid air and thrash the sky into a thick foam. Seemed to hang there for an eternity before it would fall backwards. Awesome powerful turbine that was not much bigger than a couple five gallon buckets.

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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Yep, the guy doesn't seem to have any money issues, eaaa?

 

You could just go Old School Dave !  

 

 

 

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55 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

A thousand plus horsepower! That is about $300 for each pony and that is a value! If you had money like that to spend, that would be a neat way to spend it!

Indeed it would!

He said in the video he uses 28 gallons/hr. That's only $125-150 an hour...how economical :89:

It would be nice to have that kind of money to literally burn. :)

 

Homefire, those pulse jets frighten me a lottle. I wonder how long before fatigue cracks occur around that combustion chamber? If you look when he fires it up, there is a fair amount of movement of the chamber walls with each pulse. Amazing though! I wonder how long you could stand close to it?  That pulsating shockwave might vibrate your brain to jelly.

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1 hour ago, ArcticDave said:

Indeed it would!

He said in the video he uses 28 gallons/hr. That's only $125-150 an hour...how economical :89:

It would be nice to have that kind of money to literally burn. :)

 

Homefire, those pulse jets frighten me a lottle. I wonder how long before fatigue cracks occur around that combustion chamber? If you look when he fires it up, there is a fair amount of movement of the chamber walls with each pulse. Amazing though! I wonder how long you could stand close to it?  That pulsating shockwave might vibrate your brain to jelly.

A million dollar plane that costs $125 per hour. To have that kind of cash and the time to enjoy it is really something. I don't know whether to admire the guy or kick him in the peaches.

I'm thinking about bolting two kayaks together with a tubular frame and dropping a pair of those pulse jets on it. A bucket seat and a pair of fuzzy dice and it would be ready to go fishing!

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6 minutes ago, Bedrock Bob said:

A million dollar plane that costs $125 per hour. To have that kind of cash and the time to enjoy it is really something. I don't know whether to admire the guy or kick him in the peaches.

I'm thinking about bolting two kayaks together with a tubular frame and dropping a pair of those pulse jets on it. A bucket seat and a pair of fuzzy dice and it would be ready to go fishing!

Paddling would be faster.

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2 hours ago, Saul R W said:

Paddling would be faster.

My point exactly.

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Awww...watching you fart across the lake in a pulse jet kayak catamaran would be youtube worthy :pop:

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Ya'll keep exculding the hydrofoils in these creations, they would go great with the pulse jet!! :idunno:

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, ArcticDave said:

Indeed it would!

He said in the video he uses 28 gallons/hr. That's only $125-150 an hour...how economical :89:

It would be nice to have that kind of money to literally burn. :)

 

Homefire, those pulse jets frighten me a lottle. I wonder how long before fatigue cracks occur around that combustion chamber? If you look when he fires it up, there is a fair amount of movement of the chamber walls with each pulse. Amazing though! I wonder how long you could stand close to it?  That pulsating shockwave might vibrate your brain to jelly.

LOL, They just Spooge with a ball of flames and go out.  Seen it happen.  Usually they start to bulge to the point they go out of tune and sputter out.  Only the Combustion Chamber gets that hot.  When flying they seldom ever get to RED hot.  .  I have two Chines Valveless type  here I use to play with.   a 3 lb and a 12lb thrust.    There a Hoot.  Sound sorta like a Shot Gun going off 180 times a second.  You can even get them to run on used motor oil once there up to temp. 

The the 12lb is just like this one .  http://jetzilla.com/jetZilla.html

The little one is a Thermo Jet like this.  I actually got it Eric in a Trade deal. 

 

Edited by homefire

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11 hours ago, pairadiceau said:

 

That is an awesome looking bush plane. AzNuggetBob

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