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Swampstomper Al

Is J-B Weld PlasticWeld ok for a minor coil seam repair..?

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It's what I have on hand.. Discovered a small 1" -- 1.5" scuffing separation on one side of my 10 x 14 Infinium DD coil where the bottom edge and outer shell come together.. Took a loupe to actually see it.. I'll assume it's the cause of my falsing problems, not cable / connector like I initially thought..

Planning on doing the truck bed liner coating afterwards.. Still need to inspect the rest of the coil.. If I find more separations I'll spring for a softer epoxy like pc-7 and coat the entire thing.. But if this is the only opening, does anyone know of a reason to not use this particular epoxy as the filler / sealant..? Thanks..

Swamp

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Do not! I repeat! Do not use JB weld, it has metal in it, it will make your coil fault bad! PC-7 is the way to go. Grubstake

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What Grubby said ... But make it PC-7 ... almost all hardware stores and big box lumber stores will have it.

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I use Marine Goop for all my repairs. Dries hard, clear and waterproof.

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Hmmmm... This is interesting news..

I can see & understand metals in regular J-B Weld repair epoxy, but why on earth would anyone put a metal / metals ingredient in an epoxy designed specifically for plastics..? Just doesn't make any sense to me.. But I'm not willing to chance it, especially now that more than one of you says it's so..

Ok -- is there a reason to not use Super Glue Jel..? I like the Marine Goop idea, LipCa.. I just happen to be out of it, and it's durn expensive.. The way it stands right now I need five drops of something, so buying even an 8oz epoxy kit will end up degrading on my shelves down here before ever getting used.. Merely trying to use something I already have on hand in the house under air rather than in the garage or shed..

Swamp

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Around here the Marine Goop is about $7 for a tube that last at least a year. Usually used before then. I put strips of it on my coil skid plates to give them more life.

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3 hours ago, LipCa said:

Around here the Marine Goop is about $7 for a tube that last at least a year. Usually used before then. I put strips of it on my coil skid plates to give them more life.

Sorry.. You said Goop and I read gel coat, which you need to buy by the gal for it to be economical..
It makes sense now, now that I've groked the right product.. Worth consideration for sure, tnx..

Swamp

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4 hours ago, fishing8046 said:

I would use Silicone

Why silicone instead of an epoxy..? Serious question.. I don't use a coil cover on the beaches around here since they are mostly sandy.. Normally don't scrub tho, swing just above the surface.. This coil has six years of moderate usage prior to the separation.. Not sure a spray on bed liner / tuff kote will adhere to silicone either..

Swamp

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I go through at least 4 coil covers a year.

Marine Goop cures very hard.

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Another thing you could try to is if you have any old coil covers or some pvc plastic that you could cut into little strips mix in some acetone in a glass jar-just enough to melt all the plastic into a thick glue-take a artist paint brush and spread over the cracks inside and out-might take a couple of coats-the good thing about this glus is it will melt together with the other pvc plastic-and you can just mix up enough to get the job done-just another option you could try-Hope this helps :arrowheadsmiley: Mike C...:200:

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There are numerous righteous GOOP products marine and shoe GOOP are my favorites. Shoe actually wears better than marine by quite a bit. Everyone up here carries it as hunting for Liquid Steel for days-not Liquid nails-to fix a muffler hole. Fixed headers, engines, freezeplugs etc etc BUT gone gone gone must be some chemical that insane Kalif banned. :th:John

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3 hours ago, homefire said:

Why not just use the Proper cement ? 

Well duhhhh, why use the proper adhesive when there's sooo many other products out there on the market that may or may not work..? :grr01:
Wasn't it Jerry Garcia who said something about: "...two good eyes but still can't see..." :idunno:
Honestly Homie..? I never even thought about it.. :89::idea: If anything, I guess I was thinking about wanting a product that dried clear if I ended up coating the entire coil while deceiding to not tuff-kote it as well..

This simply makes too much sense.. Thanks for pointing it out..!

Swamp

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12 minutes ago, Swampstomper Al said:

Oops.. Double tap.. My bad..

Swamp

 

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Thanks for posting that, Don, pretty amazing stuff.  I have their bedliner sprayed in the bed of my truck, but after seeing this stuff, and the way the egg and cup showed what they result in after being treated,... WOW!

 

I am going to stop in and check this latest stuff out, the shop is about 1 mile from where I live.  I'll let you know what I find out.

 

Greg

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19 hours ago, garimpo said:

What's so cool about that link, Dom, is around 7 yrs ago I got into watching tornado vids on YT..
Back then the majority of rolling footage was chance shots caught on VCR cams & forward.. Weather chasers..? Wottre those..?? Certain usernames eventually started having higher profiles than others, and one was this excitable fast-talking Reed Hastings dude & his merry band of other death-wish, moth-to-a-flame, what-me-worry sucidal blondes.. Had never seen anyone sooo wanting to jump into the middle of a tornado before in my life..!

Back in '12 or so, and I'm pretty sure this was still prior to them getting picked up by TDC etc and just posting to YouTube & their own site, they posted vid of the day they got back the new improved Dominator, upon which Line-X had also just advertising comp'd them the exterior.. A guy's telling Reed all about how tough this stuff is, and Reed isn't  really buyin' it.. The guy asks Reed if he wants to hit it with a baseball bat..? Reed just looked at him and goes are you serious..? Reed somehow ends up with a bat, double-hand overhead swings it -- and dang if that bat doesn't bounce right back n pops ol' Reed right in the noggin, LMAO !:laught16:

I bet it's still posted..

Swamp

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 What about using  a flexible ,kitchen cutting mat made from HDPE, as a sacrificial surface for the bottom of the coil?   CAn't advise on an adhesive but maybe  a few dabs  of plasitic-weld epoxy would work.

 

 I got some of these  as a gift some time back.   AS I recall ,they are maybe 0.005"- 0.010" thick.  Quick check of Wally World/Amazon shows  12"- 15"  sheets( a 3pack) costing about $4.  MIght want to shop around for thicker, though..  

 

Both LOCTITE and JB weld have 2-part , plastic bonding epoxies in syringe form.  To be sure of no metal in them( the one's I have used looked like clear epoxy) you could always wave the  unopened epoxy over  your coil.

 

 Maybe grommets could be fashioned around the perimeter to lace it on...

 

 

...or the ultimate fastener- duct tape around the perimeter:yesss:.  If the mat was cut oversize,and  the perimeter of it  notched to fold up the sides of the coil, this in my perfezhinul "armchair beepin" upinnonion, would be an easy and cheap solution.

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33 minutes ago, weaver hillbille said:

 What about using  a flexible ,kitchen cutting mat made from HDPE, as a sacrificial surface for the bottom of the coil?   CAn't advise on an adhesive but maybe  a few dabs  of plasitic-weld epoxy would work.

 I got some of these  as a gift some time back.   AS I recall ,they are maybe 0.005"- 0.010" thick.  Quick check of Wally World/Amazon shows  12"- 15"  sheets( a 3pack) costing about $4.  MIght want to shop around for thicker, though..  

Both LOCTITE and JB weld have 2-part , plastic bonding epoxies in syringe form.  To be sure of no metal in them( the one's I have used looked like clear epoxy) you could always wave the  unopened epoxy over  your coil.

Maybe grommets could be fashioned around the perimeter to lace it on...

...or the ultimate fastener- duct tape around the perimeter:yesss:.  If the mat was cut oversize,and  the perimeter of it  notched to fold up the sides of the coil, this in my perfezhinul "armchair beepin" upinnonion, would be an easy and cheap solution.

You're funny, hillbille.. So you DID get the lead in the revived "The Don Rickles Show", then..! :4chsmu1:

Actually, the sacrificial mat thing isn't a half-bad idea -- if there was a good way to completely & solidly adhere it to the bottom while still being sorta easily removable for a changeout..  Peelable spray adhesives I can think of would end up making a worse mess than sand alone trapped by a coil cover as the matting shreds exposing the tacky..

The two-stage liquid is what I've had become unusuable from summer garage heating, although I'd either use that or what Homie suggested if I was going to only repair the separation(s)..  (What I have here is the squish together stuff..) The way the rest of the coil is wearing though makes doing that viable only if I start using a coil cover -- which might just be the most sensible solution.. Other possibility is PC-7 topped with bed liner.. One of these two, methinks..

Thanks for all the input, folks.. Appreciate it..!

Swamp
 

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Why Silicone. It's inexpensive, it is clear, it will last a reasonable amount of time and it will adhere to anything. There are types of silicone adhesives that if you get it on anything you can't get it off. I have a dot on my company truck about as big as the tip of the tube of silicone well it won't come off.

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3 hours ago, fishing8046 said:

Why Silicone. It's inexpensive, it is clear, it will last a reasonable amount of time and it will adhere to anything. There are types of silicone adhesives that if you get it on anything you can't get it off. I have a dot on my company truck about as big as the tip of the tube of silicone well it won't come off.

If the separation(s) was on the side instead of the bottom I might would use silicone.. Personally I've never had good luck using silicone for these kinds of repairs.. I can never get it smooth to the surface within cracks, end up with exterior peaks & ridges and somehow it always ends up all over the place no matter how careful I try to be..

A couple months ago I had a similar experience of your truck with my van.. One of the headlight modules / assembly where the glass meets the metal / plastic has its adhesive separating ('95 Ram 2500) and condensation from the a/c was working its way through.. Actually blew a bulb out from sloshing.. I took the ass'y out, dumped & blew it dry, then siliconed the seam n put it back in.. A week later I noticed it'd touched and lightly smeared along the side of the grille during reinstallation and I can't get it off the pseudo-chrome no how no way..! Plus water is still getting in, although much slower, even after rigging a dam & collar and giving it a run-off route..I think it's working itself along the bulb wires now n getting in that way.. Gadzooks..! :grr01:

Swamp

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It is always best to use a mixture of mostly Dawn Dishwashing Soap and a bit of water when working with Silicone

Keeps it from getting every where

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 ...and masking tape....  The few times I worked with it, I had to use mineral spirits for cleanup and to also smooth the  bead of caulking.  POssibly, using a sheet of buttered, parchment paper (over large areas of the stuff )   could act to smooth  the silicone to a relatively even surface/thickness.  After a day, if  presumption is good, you'll be able to peel away the paper and see virgin silicone.

 

 If you were to apply the ( protective GOO of choice) to the parchment laid on a flat surface, then, sit the coil down  in the GOO "bed", seems the best armchair solution to me.  Even if the paper stuck, it wouldn't hurt anything.

 

 Depending on  the silicone mix  and   thinners used,  small areas may be troweled with putty knife or larger , foregoing the P/paper.

 

 

 Thickness' over 1/8"  take  much longer to dry.

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The best product I can think of for doing this, which only makes cost effective sense to do if you're doing multiple items as a coil custom bottom protective coat and those coils will never need to be taken apart from the bottom, is a two-part gel coat..

If you've ever seen "bar pours" (bars with money / photos / playing cards / whatever encased within) or (usually) nautical-themed side tables that have sea shells, sea grasses etc encased within -- they are made using two different types of two-part epoxies..

The epoxy used for the 'containment' pours (it does need to be built up, else it'll 'pull apart' during drying, leaving a valley or peak visible through the following pour, depending if it's an upside-down or rightside-up pour) never completely dries -- it remains slightly tacky, so will eventually dull.. The dilemma is solved using a gel coat sealant..

Problem was, and probably still is, it's next-to-impossible to find this stuff in anything less than 55 gallon drums.. At around $20/gal. for the resin, then, and $5 gal. for the catalyst, we're talking some serious cash outlay just to obtain it..

There are cheaper substitutes (this stuff was the clearest money could buy at the time) but I haven't looked for anything like it in years.. I'll assunme there's still a marine grade that can be gotten in gallons, but that still makes for a whole lotta coils needing done to offset cost -- either that or a boat bottom for the remainder.. At the time I was able to procure a 'hobby' grade product called "Build-50", that was available in quarts.. I used it to cover a photo collage that had been adhered to a flat piece of plywood.. It isn't thick, I'd guess 1/24".. I did that pour in 1973, and it's still as clear and uncracked as the day it was done..

The clear part wouldn't be the case on the bottom of a detector coil, but I'd sure like to know how long that stuff (the good stuff and thicker pour(s)) would hold up to the treatment we put our detectors through..?

Anyhow, if I could get my hands on some, this gel coat is what I would really want to use..

Swamp

EDIT: The gel coat is normally only necessary for the much thicker upside-down pours.. Rightside-up not-as-thick pours, like cheaper bar top pours and the photo collage I mentioned, the product used (like the Build-50) is one-step -- hardener included in product..

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