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Where does gold come from? with AZ Nugget Bob...

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That's what mystifies me... when did it start, and when did it stop. Seems we should still be bombarded by gold laden astroids if past history is any indicator. What power or entity put the kibosh to the process? :idunno:

Who said it was kiboshed?

Say it isn't so. :2mo5pow:

Thanks Jim for your vote and sending out that info.Im looking forward to reading it.

azbb What If it were a single or short period event in earth's evolution. it would explain why were not finding much gold in meteorites today.

maybe gold is comet dust coming in from a single comet that rarely passes by. simular to halley's comet or even a fine dusting from the Perseids,Comet 209P/Linear,Leonids

or the Geminids that's happening tonight. :rolleyes:

AzNuggetBob

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Bob got you and will post on Monday mail... thanks tailgate

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The Mayans said it was Tears from the SUN. Only if they knew how close they were.

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Where does gold come from?

What a silly question, everyone knows it comes from the ground off my patches underneath my nugget finder coil. ?

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Who cares where it comes from I have a hard enough time finding where it is :tisk-tisk: Mike C... :200:

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Were does gold come from?

Well according to NOAA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration $150 trillion dollars worth of metals and minerals can be found spewing out along

tectonic fault lines and hydrothermal vents in the ocean floor.

Can these old ocean hydrothermal vents be found on what is now dry land?

AzNuggetBob

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/13/130201-underwater-mining-gold-precious-metals-oceans-environment/

http://www.whoi.edu/main/topic/seafloor-mining

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Were does gold come from?

Well according to NOAA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration $150 trillion dollars worth of metals and minerals can be found spewing out along

tectonic fault lines and hydrothermal vents in the ocean floor.

Can these old ocean hydrothermal vents be found on what is now dry land?

AzNuggetBob

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/13/130201-underwater-mining-gold-precious-metals-oceans-environment/

http://www.whoi.edu/main/topic/seafloor-mining

Yes.

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/artful-amoeba/2012/01/04/deep-sea-explorers-stumble-on-antarctic-lost-world/

" In fact, most of the ore veins found on Earth are ancient hydrothermal vent systems, although these can form on dry land, too, at places like Yellowstone, or deep within the earth."

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I found some gold today and I think it originated at the bottom of my hole I dug :)

Ok, my take on it...What ever you believe in...God created the earth, big bang or whatever...

It was in the original make up of the blob were living on. As the eons passed and the blob evolved.....all the reactions formed it

That's as deep as im going to go....unless its still screaming at the bottom of the hole...then ill go deeper :)
Tom H.

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Well we sure have covered the broad spectrum of how the gold (and other) minerals

and metals came from... AzNuggetBob.. now in the next step are you are you going

to lead us to mine the gold out of the ground....

Anyone have or can get a copy of "Relations of Tectonics to Ore Deposits in the

Southern Cordillera... Edited by W R Dickenson & W D Payne?

It was published as Volume XIV by the Arizona Geological Society Tucson, Arizona

1981. It is out of print but used copies should be still available. I highly

recommend it as a reference/research source of information by a diverse of well

known authors.

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Well we sure have covered the broad spectrum of how the gold (and other) minerals

and metals came from... AzNuggetBob.. now in the next step are you are you going

to lead us to mine the gold out of the ground....

Anyone have or can get a copy of "Relations of Tectonics to Ore Deposits in the

Southern Cordillera... Edited by W R Dickenson & W D Payne?

It was published as Volume XIV by the Arizona Geological Society Tucson, Arizona

1981. It is out of print but used copies should be still available. I highly

recommend it as a reference/research source of information by a diverse of well

known authors.

Jim Im gonna check out this book. I dont think I have it?

also Jim I'll be throwing in more info.

share some stuff that's been working for me over the years.

if hunters understand were gold comes from, there going to find more gold.

I think many are concentrating on just placers or even well known placers. so I'll

show how I hunt well known (hunted hard) placer deposits and info to help find the source of the gold.

So far its been fun,funny and some great educational stuff here too.

so everyone, have fun out there.

Don't let your pick get rusty!

AzNuggetBob

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http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110907132044.htm

"Ultra high precision analyses of some of the oldest rock samples on Earth by researchers at the University of Bristol provides clear evidence that the planet's accessible reserves of precious metals are the result of a bombardment of meteorites more than 200 million years after Earth was formed.

Dr Willbold continued: "Our work shows that most of the precious metals on which our economies and many key industrial processes are based have been added to our planet by lucky coincidence when the Earth was hit by about 20 billion billion tonnes of asteroidal material.""The research is published in Nature.

During the formation of Earth, molten iron sank to its centre to make the core. This took with it the vast majority of the planet's precious metals -- such as gold and platinum. In fact, there are enough precious metals in the core to cover the entire surface of Earth with a four-metre thick layer.

The removal of gold to the core should leave the outer portion of Earth bereft of bling. However, precious metals are tens to thousands of times more abundant in Earth's silicate mantle than anticipated. It has previously been argued that this serendipitous over-abundance results from a cataclysmic meteorite shower that hit Earth after the core formed. The full load of meteorite gold was thus added to the mantle alone and not lost to the deep interior.

To test this theory, Dr Matthias Willbold and Professor Tim Elliott of the Bristol Isotope Group in the School of Earth Sciences analysed rocks from Greenland that are nearly four billion years old, collected by Professor Stephen Moorbath of the University of Oxford. These ancient rocks provide a unique window into the composition of our planet shortly after the formation of the core but before the proposed meteorite bombardment.

The researchers determined the tungsten isotopic composition of these rocks. Tungsten (W) is a very rare element (one gram of rock contains only about one ten-millionth of a gram of tungsten) and, like gold and other precious elements, it should have entered the core when it formed. Like most elements, tungsten is composed of several isotopes, atoms with the same chemical characteristics but slightly different masses. Isotopes provide robust fingerprints of the origin of material and the addition of meteorites to Earth would leave a diagnostic mark on its W isotope composition.

Dr Willbold observed a 15 parts per million decrease in the relative abundance of the isotope 182W between the Greenland and modern day rocks. This small but significant change is in excellent agreement with that required to explain the excess of accessible gold on Earth as the fortunate by-product of meteorite bombardment.

Dr Willbold said: "Extracting tungsten from the rock samples and analysing its isotopic composition to the precision required was extremely demanding given the small amount of tungsten available in rocks. In fact, we are the first laboratory world-wide that has successfully made such high-quality measurements."

The impacting meteorites were stirred into Earth's mantle by gigantic convection processes. A tantalising target for future work is to study how long this process took. Subsequently, geological processes formed the continents and concentrated the precious metals (and tungsten) in ore deposits which are mined today.

I don't dispute the above info, just the theory of 3 meteors being the lone contributors.

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While we're still talking about geologic and hydrothermal vents.

You may have heard people refer to the golden triangle in Az? for most they are referring

to Lynx placers, Vulture placers, San Domingo placers and most everything in-between.

these are all very rich and well known gold mining areas.

If you look at these on a map they form a triangle. ever heard of Thumb butt, Vuture peak, Red Picacho peak?

these are igneous batholith's and are a great indicator of the type and age

of the rock and activity in these areas,they are only about 60-68M years old pushing up through the

metamorphic Yavapai Schist layers.

They are formed by the intrusion and solidification of magma.

in some cases a volcanic neck or plug and geothermal venting is common around the perimeter of these areas for miles. when these boiling solutions become acidic, they will free up gold from the rock deep below and carry metals up to the surface and precipitate along fault zones filling the cracks and vugs in quartz veins, and hematite and magnetite dike contacts in the schists,granites and gneiss.

You should become familiar with these rock types and hunt under and along the veins,stringers

and dikes in them looking for nugget patches.

Useing this method has helped me find a lot of patches in this area. :):wee:

AzNuggetBob

Edited by AzNuggetBob
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Here is a study that makes for an interesting read:

http://www.weather.com/science/news/earthquakes-water-to-gold-20130319

This report above caused me to read a story about 'volcanic' gold but it is really about small amounts of gold in super hot water and then 'deposited' out of solution at some location. Maybe it is this super hot water with gold and quartz that we see in veins?

http://www.geotimes.org/dec06/NN_gold.html

Edited by mn90403
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Maybe it is this super hot water with gold and quartz that we see in veins?

Yup, super hot H2O, SiO4 ( or is it 2? :89: ) , and AU.

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Exactly guys, but first let me say this theory doesnt apply to all gold deposits.

but I think they are more common than previously believed.

I noticed these three peaks ( Thumb butt, Vuture peak, Red Picacho peak ) back in the 90's and thought what a coincidence. :89:

they look alot alike? all in the golden triangle. so I did some research and found out they all

were volcanic related, extinct volcanoes and not that old! in geologic terms anyway.

could they and the hydrothermal venting they created be at least one source of the gold deposits in the area?

I think so.

AzNuggetBob

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could they and the hydrothermal venting they created ...

AzNuggetBob

A great example of the thermal instability within the EArth.

The EArth has a fever :4chsmu1:

( I am not AlGordo)

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It's just venting its rage. :D AzNuggetBob

Edited by AzNuggetBob

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This has become a very hot topic, with 66 replies and over 1000 views in just 5 days, obviously it's a subject that's getting the attention of many of our members and visitors, so per Jim's suggestion I have "pinned" this topic!

Thanks Bob for starting this topic!

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I know some people don't like to follow links so from my earlier post:

Earthquakes have the Midas touch, a new study claims.

Water in faults vaporizes during an earthquake, depositing gold, according to a model published in the March 17 issue of the journal Nature Geoscience. The model provides a quantitative mechanism for the link between gold and quartz seen in many of the world's gold deposits, said Dion Weatherley, a geophysicist at the University of Queensland in Australia and lead author of the study.

The next link says:

Gold mine deposited rapidly

NN_gold1.jpgFor those with gold fever, there’s good news. One of the world’s largest gold deposits may have been deposited in the geologic blink of an eye — within only 55,000 years.

Lihir Island in Papua New Guinea is home to the Ladolam gold deposit, which contains about 1,600 metric tons of gold. The only known active deposit of its kind, it lies at the center of the island in the remnants of an ancient collapsed volcano, and is part of an extensive hydrothermal system of superheated, mineral-rich fluids.

The fluids at Ladolam contain dissolved gold, which stays in solution at the high pressures deep within the extinct volcano, but precipitates out as the fluids rise toward the surface and decompress. Geologists are still uncertain about the origin of those fluids, how much fluid is needed, and how long it takes for the fluids to build a major ore deposit, says Christoph Heinrich, an economic geologist at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. Understanding these factors is important for locating and developing such deposits, Heinrich says.

Indeed, hydrothermal ore deposits make up about 50 percent of the world’s mined gold, says Stuart Simmons, a geologist at the University of Auckland in New Zealand. “Although luck has a large part to do with the discovery of new deposits, it always seems to help to know as much as possible about the processes that caused the deposits to form,” he says.

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The closest known active volcanic area that

could impact Arizona is the Long Valley caldera region

along the east side of the Sierra Nevada in east-central

California. The Mammoth Lakes area, part of this volcanic

center, has experienced signs of activity recently,

including earthquake swarms and venting of gases.

An interesting read, but a little dated.

http://www.azgs.az.gov/HomeOwners-OCR/HG10_volcanichazards.pdf

Hope one DON'T blow it's top... :yikes:

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Thanks Jim,Bill and Au Seeker for pinning this thread,and thanks to all of you that have been supporting this thread with your comments.

I think this subject needs to be explored in a little more detail.

Ive heard this question asked what seems like a million times.

Where does gold come from?

There have been a lot of new discoveries these days,many that were over looked in the past.

AzNuggetBob

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If gold comes from water then where does water come from? Here ... according to a new research theory:

http://news.osu.edu/news/2014/12/17/study-hints-that-ancient-earth-made-its-own-water%E2%80%94geologically/

Study Hints that Ancient Earth Made Its Own Water—Geologically Evidence that rock circulating in the mantle feeds world’s oceans even today

By: Pam Frost Gorder

Published on December 17, 2014

SAN FRANCISCO—A new study is helping to answer a longstanding question that has recently moved to the forefront of earth science: Did our planet make its own water through geologic processes, or did water come to us via icy comets from the far reaches of the solar system?

The answer is likely “both,” according to researchers at The Ohio State University— and the same amount of water that currently fills the Pacific Ocean could be buried deep inside the planet right now.

At the American Geophysical Union (AGU) meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 17, they report the discovery of a previously unknown geochemical pathway by which the Earth can sequester water in its interior for billions of years and still release small amounts to the surface via plate tectonics, feeding our oceans from within.

panero.jpg

Wendy Panero

In trying to understand the formation of the early Earth, some researchers have suggested that the planet was dry and inhospitable to life until icy comets pelted the earth and deposited water on the surface.

Wendy Panero, associate professor of earth sciences at Ohio State, and doctoral student Jeff Pigott are pursuing a different hypothesis: that Earth was formed with entire oceans of water in its interior, and has been continuously supplying water to the surface via plate tectonics ever since.

This will be a real 'blow' to the global warming group that think that water is all on the surface as vapor, liquid or solid!

Edited by mn90403
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Whatever happened to the evaporation and then rain theory? I was happy with that one... :D But i do think some water is coming from somewhere other than evap and rain. If we counted every human being and added their weights together and multiplied by 98%, yes, we got some water coming from somewhere. Or the oceans would be dry... :ROFL:

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Rim it just goes Round and Round, It never goes anywhere it just multiplies. Im throwin them out there too. :Just_Cuz_15: , :hide: its just a theory. :D AzNuggetBob

Edited by AzNuggetBob

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Here is a map I put together in paint to illustrate

how I go about hunting most new gold areas.

it shows a large typical gold nugget patch outcrop from its source, in this case a (quartz vein)to a placer concentration below.

This method has helped me find some of my largest nuggets and find nuggets in many so-called hunted out patches.

I call it hunting Outside the Box.

The old timers often camped right on their workings and this often ends up trashing it with their dumps

or the remains of the tin roofs or mining equipment. these areas of known gold deposits are were many start hunting first because

of the obvious signs of workings. this is why I save these areas for last and head up outside

the box first looking for the source and larger nuggets that havent made it down to the main placer area.

I found this method works in about 75% of the gold areas I hunt.

I will be adding more on this later as time permits.

AzNuggetBob

post-26382-0-19882500-1418958017_thumb.j

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