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Bob, this coming from someone with your knowledge and ability really humbles me.

You have been a great friend over the years. My new hip is going great. I'm now

able to walk "and rarin' ta' go." This post is not about me, but intended to

be about epithermal placers.

Over 30 years ago, a well known and far-sighted economist with some knowledge

of geology to this effect said

... Geologists explain what they call epithermal deposits as meaning that when

the earth was being formed and the molten rocks were cooling silver was formed

on the outer edges of the earth edge. The richest and latgest deposits were

grass roots and easily formed and now the silver mines are mostly found and

worked out. .... No matter how much the base metals ores are worked there

will be a coming shotage of silver for coining and silver will soon rise to

over $7/ounce.

I have always been impressed by the above simplified interpretation of

epithermal deposits. At this time Carlin-type silver/gold deposits were

still in the future until about 1965. Today, many of the once known

epithermal silver (and gold) "worked" out are now being found to be

Carlin-Type and now being worked bigtime for "invisible" silver and gold.

Nearly all of the larger and smaller old epithermal diggings will,or will

be re-claimed and re-examined and many will be drilled and some will

become another Carlin-Type.

The point of this is to mention, some knowledgeable small miners and

especially fulltimers are now detecting old epithermal precious metal

placer deposits with a modern gold specific metal detector for the up

to now surface gold and electum (a silver/gold alloy) placers.

More later?? so keep posting... this is how we all learn...

Ol' Tailgate jim

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Mr. Jim;

I am interested in the precious metals deposits that are part of the Piedmont in Eastern alabama. Would you happen to know anything about them or be able to point me towards some better information than I am able to find at present?

Thanks so much!!!

Chris

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Howdy chris... My knowledge of Alabama is rather dated. I once was

in contact with several prospectors who were in Alabama. One

was originally known as "Arizona Al" and later as "Alabama

Al." Al was one great guy and sold Tesoro detectors. I have lost

contact with him but if you can contact him he is very knowlegable.

I was was once in contact with a geologist who was with the Alabama

Geological Survey. Most likely the original geological Survey

has moved or now part of another agency, but it was then in

Tusaloosa.

The best contact I van give you would to be Ron kruegar of the GPAA

chapter in Alabama (Cragford) ronkrueger@earthlink.net

Alabama has a long history of both placer and quartz veins.

The Alabama Survey estimated around 50,000 ounces by both Lode and

Placer Mining. Gold panning dates back to around 1830. The Piedmont

belt is well known and roughly trends about 90-110 miles by about

50 to 40 miles wide. My Best... jim

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Hi Jim, last I heard Al was in GA....

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Bill... You are right and I was wrong. It was Georgia.

Au Seeker... Thank you for posting your link... Please keep them coming

as I'm unable to do so... While Ed held a PHd as a Petrolum engineer he

wrote over 300 great aticles on many subjects for the CMJ/ICMJ

Anyone have a copy of the "Nuggetshooter's Bible" (pg 212)?... I

reference another one of Dr. Heylmun's series of great articles, but it

was not a feature article: "Gold in Maryland in Maryland & Viginia"

pg. 34 in the April 1986 CMJ.

Also another CMJ article September 1985 (pg 7) "regarding the Corps of

Engineers discovering potentually significent concentrations of placer

minerals in several sea floor deposits off the coasts of Virginia

and Georgia."

Bill, I cannot thank you enough for all you have done for me. It is

absolutely great you pinned this thread. But it is not about me!!!

I'm just an old prospector/educator.

It is ALL OF YOU who have posted, or will post on the thread... So Go for

it and keep the learning and good fellowship going... This is the greatest

thing that can happen to any teacher/educator.

I will look in at times and give "good thoughts and any information" I

may still have...

My Best to All of You and "more later"... Tailgate Jim Straight

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Thanks AU, Jim and Bill. i appreciate the link to the article as it tells me what kind of rock that the gold is disseminated in. Saprolite is just rotten bedrock correct? I am not so sure what the definition of Laterite is, so off to google I go. I have located, I think, what the ICMJ article refers to as a "hydraulic cut" in the area mentioned in the article, and have brought back a couple of 5 gallon buckets of material to test. I actually got my best results from a tailings pile at the end of one of the cuts. Very fine gold, probably 30 colors from @ 3 gallons of tailings. I only dug down into the top of the pile about 18 inches or so, I am assuming that the deeper I go in the pile, the richer it will get??? The cuts are very deep and narrow.

Thanks very much!!!

Chris

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Chris,

Saprolite is chemically weathered igneous rock A.K.A. as "rotten" bedrock and a lot of gold is indeed found in Saprolite in Georgia and Alabama.

If you can find a copy of the U. S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 213 mentioned at the end of that article you would have most all the answers you ever need about gold in the Piedmont region, i did a search trying to find a copy since it's out of print through the USGS, and I was only able to find one copy for $175, I would buy it if it's is still available but I just don't have the bucks right now to do so.

"Every prospector who is interested in the Piedmont region should examine U. S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 213, which should be available for inspection at large research libraries."

You maybe able to find a copy to examine as mentioned in the article at a large research type library, I think your best bet would be at a large college library, if you're interested in the copy I found online here's a link, it's about halfway down the webpage, all the USGS Professional Papers are in numerical order.

The title of the paper is "USGS Professional Paper 213 : 1948 : Gold deposits of the southern Piedmont by J.T. Pardee and C.F. Park, Jr. "

http://www.woodenski...at/usgs/pp1.htm

Edit: I just found another copy for sale for $165, still out of my budget right now, about 1/4 of the way down this page...

http://booksgeology.com/usgs_geologic%20professional_papers.htm

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Thanks AU, Jim and Bill. i appreciate the link to the article as it tells me what kind of rock that the gold is disseminated in. Saprolite is just rotten bedrock correct? I am not so sure what the definition of Laterite is, so off to google I go. I have located, I think, what the ICMJ article refers to as a "hydraulic cut" in the area mentioned in the article, and have brought back a couple of 5 gallon buckets of material to test. I actually got my best results from a tailings pile at the end of one of the cuts. Very fine gold, probably 30 colors from @ 3 gallons of tailings. I only dug down into the top of the pile about 18 inches or so, I am assuming that the deeper I go in the pile, the richer it will get??? The cuts are very deep and narrow.

Thanks very much!!!

Chris

Those spots are where a highbanker really pays off in Al./ Ga.---provided you have a good enough water source close by. If not a recirculating set up works.

I good place to hit is old county libaries---some county and state records go quite a ways back and are good to compare with newer geological reports.

When the waters got too cold for dredging I would spend my time on those cuts.

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Thanks for the link Au Seeker, and for the advice MacGump. The cuts are nowhere near any water, so I have been looking at setting up a recirculating highbanker. It is hard to find a good 12v pump that will push 45gpm, and that is affordable :) does anyone have any suggestions???

I appreciate you all!!!

Chris

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Howdy jim gilmore... are you still in NY? Hope all is good with you.

AuSeeker... I'm limited in "know how," but try googling this address

if'n you are still looking for a copy of USGS PP-213. If all else fails

send him a letter. Walter Lombardo ~~ Nevada Mineral & Book Company

342 S Tustin St. ~~ Orange CA 92866 More later... jim

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Thanks Jim,

They didn't have a copy listed via a search of the website, but I did submit a search form so that they can check and see if they have a copy that hasn't been listed online.

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Thanks Jim Straight for the info. When I got up this morning the thermometer was saying that it was 58 degrees in North Alabama...Good weather.

Jim Gilmore...I see what you are saying...can I run a couple pumps in series off of one vehicle battery, or would I need 1 batt per pump?

I saw a little DIY rig the other day while perusing the DIY forum that was a small lawn mower engine mated with a vehicle alternator. Nice setup for recharging...

Macgump, have you ever dredged on the Chulafinnee in AL near the AL/GA line???

Regards all!

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Hey Stan "SLNugget"... I also confess some of the govenment publications (and manuals) are difficult to read.

No worry, this is SOP. (Sidebar: I also have a copy of the 1979 handbook you recently found.)

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Jim,

I am so happy that your replacement went well and you are doing fine. I am new here and to Arizona. My mind is on overload just from reading this thread. Just started nugget shooting and panning in this area and as of yet don't belong to any clubs. After 30 yrs. working for the man I finally got to retirement age. I've always had the fever every time I went fishing or camping a pan was always first in the truck. I had some luck in northern Utah but Arizona is home now since I have to take care of both my aging parents. I really need some help steering me in the right direction in this area. Any help would be appreciated. Will work for gold. :wubu:

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Hey Sledge, start by making the October outing.... Welcome to the forum!

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Yup ... go and eat cake with the boys! ... you'll know what I mean if you go! :) Mike F

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A question for you who are more educated in geology than I am.

I was't able to procure a copy of the 1948 Park and Partee geological bulletin, but I sent off to the Alabama Geological Survey for and received a Gold bulletin that was published in the late 80's, and re-published in '99. I have been reading the bulletin and have learned so much!!!

One of the reports listed some results from some samples taken in streams near an area that had several old prospects. Whatever tests they used to determine the amount of Au in each sample listed the results in Parts Per Million (ppm). My question is this...how do I convert a result in PPM to a number that I can use to determine if that streambed has enough Au to warrant a highbanker trip? Can you convert PPM to ounces or grams Per Ton?, or some other usable measurement?

Thanks lots!!!

Chris

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Instructions


    • First

      Write down the number of parts per million that you want to convert.
    • Then

      Decide whether you want to convert to ounces per British or American ton.

    • If you want to convert to ounces per British ton, multiply by 0.0358. If you want to convert to ounces per American ton, multiply by 0.032.
    • From E-How
    • You will then need to do the math to convert to troy weight.....

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Thanks Bill,

So if the report stated that by panning 1 sample in a creek in a certain location and analyzing the results of the pan to be 50.0 ppm of Au....

50.0 ppm x 0.032 = 1.6 ounces per ton....that would be a good place to set up a highbanker then.....right????

Chris

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boog,

I would think that's a decent amount of gold per ton. Just my 2 cents.

Rim

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Rim, seems like there was also a sample taken from a small tributary that measured 101 ppm.

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