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Howdy Red_desert... I'm looking at my latest edition od the GPAA Mining Guide.

Elkhart county is not listed as a gold and diamond occurrance in Indiana. But

your attached thumbnail photos of your flowerbed sure look promising. Is your

area cosidered to be within a major moraine?

Incidentally, Frank C. in post #21 mentions to the effect that both that jim

straight and chris ralph both have written information on epithermal deposits.

I would be reamiss if I didn't mention one of Chris's many articles regarding

epithermal deposits: "Basic Geology for the Independent Miner-- Part V (geology

of hardrock gold deposits)" is written on epithermal deposits. It is found in

the ICMJ... pg 5, Vol. 75, No. 9, May 2006.

One thing for sure we are all learning more and more about epithermal precious

metal ore deposits and associated placers... jim straight

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My GPAA new mining guide just came in the mail. They haven't had Elkhart county listed, but their morraine maps show deposits running through the county, one line seems to have stopped close to here.

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Red_desert... The gpaa guide is limited... The December 2011 ICMJ has a pretty

extensive article on Indiana glacial gold... If'n you do not have a copy I have one to give

you. (I just PM'd you for a mailing address to send the issue to you)...

To Everyone: I'm not ignoring any of you who have posted me good wishes and

encouragement:.... I really appreciate the kind thoughts!!!.

I'm a teacher.. educator at heart. As I have mentioned earler, in this or other forums, and in

my writings and books: Epithermal precious metal ore deposits are associated with mountain

buildingout and volcanisn during the late Jurassic and throughout the Tertiary and there and

many hit and miss shallow ore deposits or associated placers that could still be overlooked.

Since they are shallow they may have formed placers and were drywashed by the oldtimers

and now can be reworked by using a modern gold specific metal detector...

Thery are found within the Great Basin Provence and Mohave desert... They are found world

wide within the volcanic belts of active volcanisn associated with plate tectonics. They may

have not been recognized as epithemal by many early geologists before the 1930's. Today

old considered worked out epithermal deposits are being drilled by major mining companies

as they could be another Carlin-Trend micron-gold deposit at depth.

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Hi Jim, I am well into the book you recommended to me and learning through your help once again....

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Red_desert... The gpaa guide is limited... The December 2011 ICMJ has a pretty

extensive article on Indiana glacial gold... If'n you do not have a copy I have one to give

you. (I just PM'd you for a mailing address to send the issue to you)...

To Everyone: I'm not ignoring any of you who have posted me good wishes and

encouragement:.... I really appreciate the kind thoughts!!!.

I'm a teacher.. educator at heart. As I have mentioned earler, in this or other forums, and in

my writings and books: Epithermal precious metal ore deposits are associated with mountain

buildingout and volcanisn during the late Jurassic and throughout the Tertiary and there and

many hit and miss shallow ore deposits or associated placers that could still be overlooked.

Since they are shallow they may have formed placers and were drywashed by the oldtimers

and now can be reworked by using a modern gold specific metal detector...

Thery are found within the Great Basin Provence and Mohave desert... They are found world

wide within the volcanic belts of active volcanisn associated with plate tectonics. They may

have not been recognized as epithemal by many early geologists before the 1930's. Today

old considered worked out epithermal deposits are being drilled by major mining companies

as they could be another Carlin-Trend micron-gold deposit at depth.

Oh Jim, I see you meant GPAA magazine, yes I have the issue/article. I already sent the email.

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No, your're not talking about GPAA magazine, they had an article in there too a while back. Wonder if it was much the same?

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Mr Straight...Happy to hear you are doing well. I love your work. I have read "the Nugget Shooters Bible" several times cover to cover. You Sir are a true inspiration and I hope to meet you in person someday soon. Take care.

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Hello Jim, wondered if you were still around! I got that "Advanced Prospecting & Detecting for Hardrock Gold" before taking my first prospecting trip to Arizona. I think you suggested to try looking in Indiana first.

I have a buddy of mine who lives in Goshen. I met him in Arizona a few years ago and he showed me some glacial placer gold he was panning from a stream about a two hour drive south from where he lived. Really nice, coarse looking gold.

Steve

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I have a buddy of mine who lives in Goshen. I met him in Arizona a few years ago and he showed me some glacial placer gold he was panning from a stream about a two hour drive south from where he lived. Really nice, coarse looking gold.

Steve

Yes, I found Glaucophane (mineral associated with these morraines) from Goshen, out to Fort Wayne and down all the way to Kokomo Indiana. Much of the morraines were dumped in this area. South of Goshen, a 2 hour drive will put you near a limestone reef which runs through Logansport to an old rock quarry at a park. The name of it is France Park.

http://www.francepark.com/

The old quarry filled with water after hitting a spring. Now they use it for scuba diving.

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Big Jeff... Thanks... Gosh everyone I'm on slow dialup and a slower typest..

I thank everyone on the sub-forum thread who has given me encouragement

with the bump-in-the-road Osteoarthritis. I'm doing fine.Thanks for thinking of me.

Now more on the subject of glacial gold in Indiana. The article "where to find gold in

Indiana" was in the ICMJ. It is in two parts. Part one is in Vol 80 No 4. Part 2 is in

Vol 81 No 2012.

It is a great read. Anyone who lives in an aria that is known for Ice-age continental

glaciation would enjoy reading this two-part article. The author is an avid gold

prospector who successfully finds gold. His name is Chuck Lassiter and he id the

the author of Midwest Gold Prospecting. He can be reached via his website:

midwestprospector.com

Sorry, I'm limited in "how-to' post his website, but this is how it appears in the ICMJ article.

The ICMJ kindly sends me two copies each month. I pass them on. I still had a copy of

Vol. 80 which I posted to Steve (Red_desert). I believe I also have a copy of Vol 81. If I

still have it, I will also post it asap.

For those who are interested in Arizona epithermal deposits.The Arizona Geological

Society Digest Volume XV was edited by Joe Wikins Jr. in 1984 and naturally over

the passage of time some of it may be dated. However, the Basin Range Provence

shows both the Mohave Block and the Porphry Copper Block, both of which are also

found in Arizona.

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Jim,

Interesting read here. So if you want epithermal deposit's or pods, you will need some volcanoes around to find them.

"Why does Northern Arizona have so many geologically young volcanoes? Most volcanoes are located near boundaries of the Earth's tectonic plates, but Arizona is well within the interior of the North American Plate. Some geologists suggest that there is a site of localized melting, or "hot spot," fixed deep within the Earth's mantle beneath northern Arizona. As the North American Plate moves slowly westward over this stationary source of molten rock (magma), eruptions produce volcanoes that are strung out progressively eastward."

http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Volcanoes/Arizona/description_arizona_volcanoes.html

For some reason I have been under the impression that all pods were found shallow. Is this not the case Jim? Some are deep?

Not sure who posted this picture, but thank you to whoever did.

When I looked at this I was surprised not to see any pods located shallow on the side of the volcanoe's slopes. Wonder why the artist of this drawing left them out...hmmm...Maybe it was drawn before pod findings ever occurred?

Jim I hope i'm not bugging you too much...hehe!!!

Rim

post-26159-0-21642700-1343390275_thumb.j

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rim... the diagram is a small scale cartoon-type rendering of two of the three "types" of hydrothermal

gold deposits.

The third, not shown would be (3) "Hypothermal" and any gold deposits would have originally formed at

great depth and pressure fully within and at great depth in what is labled the granite and granodiorite

intrusions. Example eastern Appalachian and parts of theCatskill and Allegheny gold regions.

The (2) Mesothermal zone which is shown is still in the granite and granodiorite zone, but at less depth

and pressure. Example the California motherlode.

Now notice the (1) Epithermal zone is found in what is labeled the volcanic rocks which extrusive rocks that

are related to mountain building and faulting. Also notice the source of the volcanics is the

granite/granodiorite (which should be labeled as plutonic rocks since the extrusive lavas are labeled

volcanic rocks.) The best known epithermal deposit is Virginia Ciity Nevada

I'm just a slow typer on dialup... For more information ry googling: "epiithemal precious metal ore deposits"

Epithermal gold deposits are often a mixture gold and silver and can vary from eithrer gold to silver and

is known as electrum if more than 20% silver is present.

The pods and any gold veins are within the volcanic "ore bringers." The pods can occure withing a

volcanic ore bringer (at different intervals like beads irregularity strung on a string) within the volcanic

rock zone.

The source of the epithermal gold deposits are often fissure veins associated with mountain bullding

are follow the "crack" in the earth (slang). WOW... please excuse the typos...

ANYONE... please feel free to chime in...You are most welcome to comment, correct or add. jim straight

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Is it not also true that some of that happened in early epoc times and much of that has eroded, I'm speaking of California. Hense why some of those "pods/deposits" are now surface "patches"

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Amen El D as we are in a constant state of erosion....geological too---John

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Rinshot is correct in his last post regarding the spreading of volcanos away from the rim of fire.

Epithermal-type deposits are not limited to the precious metals. They have been the source of

other metals related to volcanics. Actually epithermal deposits are worldwide.

I have been interested in epithermal ore deposits as long as I can rember.Both my wife and my

grandparents were deep into mining eitthermal precious metal deposits. My grandmother ((Vietti)

was at Clifford Nevada durings its heyday around 1906-1909, then later to Blair and Tonopah,

Glorias mother was born in Vernon Nevada in 1910. Her dad was Frank Bird a mining engineer

originally from Boston. He was the mine supentendent at the Seven Troughs Coalition Mining

company at 7-troughs during its early days beginning about 1907 until about 1914, but he wisely

left when the workings started to encounter water that eventually shut down underground mining

by about 1917.

(Sidebar: in 1912 the 7-troughs canyon flood rushed through the community of 7-troughs and

wiped out the town of Mazuma three miles below 7-troughs. It was a flash flood that reached

over 20-ft high in the narrow canyon. The folks in 7-troughs were mostly on high ground and were

safe. Glorias grandmother held Gloria's mom who was two years old in 1912. Most of 7-troughs was on highrer ground But unfortunatly, the telephone line was destroyed and the folks in Mazuma were not warned in time and Mazmuma became history.)

Both Clifford and Seven Troughs were epithemal precious metal ore deposits. Thus, I bcame

familiar with epithemal ore deposits even before I attended Mackay School of Mines. I found

learning about them exciting to me and have been involved with them over the past 50+ years.

But I freely admit my knowledge of the mechanisms that make them work, so as to speak, still

confound me. But I'm comforted with the thought I'm not alone, many far better geologists are in

the "same boat."

.

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That's a good point El D. Hard to know if a patch was a pod in earlier times. Who knows? Maybe all patches on a volcano could be considered remnants of past pods.

Jim, am I correct in assuming pods are only found on volcanoes?

I wonder if Goldstudmuffin was on a volcano when he found all the gold he found....lol! Speaking of, where is that rascal? I miss his post.

"Why does Northern Arizona have so many geologically young volcanoes?" Wonder why we never here about this in the news.

Can anyone here tell me the names of at least 5 volcanoes in the state of Arizona?

The more I read into this the more confused I become... :grr01:

But it is a very interesting subject indeed.

Jim that's one heck of mining history you and your family share.

Amateur drawing included... :rolleyes:

Rim

post-26159-0-02736700-1343520195_thumb.j

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Wow! I never realized there were so many craters in Arizona. Most located in Coconino county.

http://en.wikipedia....ters_in_Arizona

Here's another good link to the volcanic fields in Arizona.

http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/fact-sheet/fs017-01/

Rim

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Gosh everyone... this tread is moving along great thanks to all of you who are posting.

As I have mentioned in earlier posts I'm on slow dialup and also a two finger typest.

Just continue using search-engines to learn more about epithermal ore deposits.

They have been an important type of mineral deposit associated with the Late Jurassic

and Tertiary volcanism and low angle detachment faulting within the North American

Cordillera. What makes it important to us, is that they are becoming more known by

the more serous detectorists who are out re-working both known and new elluvial placers

in the desert areas of the Great Basin and Mohave Desert... actually what is known as

within the vast Great Basin Provence.

I have been aware of them for about 60 years. As a young geologist I found them exiting

and they have captured my interest and I have wrote articles for over 30 some years about

them and also was involved in both small scale and even a large scale operation as a

"go-fer" for a well known exploration geologist.

Randy... I get two copies of the ICMJ every month. I give one away and usually keep one, but

sometimes I give it away too. I just found my second copy of where to find gold in indiana.

I mailed my copy to you today. The author Chuck Lassiter, is also the author of midwest

gold prospecting. His website: midwest prospector.com

I encourage everone to continue learning more and more regarding the low temperature epithermal system. jim straight

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Got both copies Jim, in my maiilbox the other day....thanks! Has part 1 & 2 of "Where to find gold in Indiana". I've noticed crossing the Wabash river before, how much it looks in places like a deeply cut waterway. The glacial floods must have done it.

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Bill... are you still here? I was going to let this thread fade away. However I was asked

(by a phone call) about the relationship between Carlin-Type "invisible" gold deposits

and epithermal precious metal ore deposits.

Being hard of hearing I said I would reply by updating this thread as it has a lot of great

information beginning on pg 3. It is important to know that epithermal type deposits are

not restricted to fissure veins.

Suffice to say, the Carlin-Type invisible gold deposits are another variety... a subtitle if

you please... of the epithermal deposits. The importance of all of the known earlier and

"worked out" and abandoned and even forgotten older epithermal deposits, especially

the smaller producers, such as ellendale, clifford and others... and the newer ones

upon being drilled... may be an another Carlin type at depth.

Thus, there are a few fulltimers who are now seeking out and detecting older gold-silver

epithermal type, long considered worked out. While this was true years ago, today,

some but not all, are now being successfully reworked by those using metal detectors.

I first became aware of this in northern Nevada while using a VLF-type gold specific

detector. Today there are now Pulse-type detectors. It is not important as to which is

used as many, but not all "worked-out" epithemal precious metal ore deposits have

associated eluvial placers. They are shallow and may be only a small pocket. It

doesn't matter "what detector" but being first is critical. I'm limited to dialup but this

might help:

http://www.icmj2.com/01jan/01janfeature.htm

It is a feature summary of an article I wrote as a freelance writer for the ICMJ. Also for

those that have back issues of the ICMJ there is a article in the "picks & pans" section

about George Duffy finding a pocket in vol. 74 no. 1~~~ September 2004 issue.

Hope this helps... jim

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Gosh I posted the above link correctly but it a gremlin got it. It was in

the january 2001 issue of the ICMJ... jim

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Jim,

That link looked good to me but I couldn't get it to work. Always good to see ya Jim.

Rim

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Yes I am here Jim and always waiting for you to update, I am going to pin this to the top of the forum so I can keep an eye on it. I have been very busy researching and also reading and find myself with a busy season ahead, if it would just cool down early....

Thanks for sharing your mind here my friend!

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Jim you never mentioned the hip replacement in our emails, you tough old fart. I'm new to this forum or I would have known. I want to thank you again for your autographed books. And I want you to know their top shelf in my prospecting book collection. I get them out every once in awhile just to refresh my memory.

I hope we get a chance to meet again sometime soon, Take care Jim. AzNuggetBob

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