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HONOR THE FALLEN...

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On Memorial Day please remember these fallen American hero's that gave their all for our freedoms....

1. The American Cemetery at Aisne-Marne,

France.. A total of 2289

2. The American Cemetery at Ardennes , Belgium .

A total of 5329

3. The American Cemetery at Brittany, France .

A total of 4410

4. Brookwood , England American Cemetery. A total of 468

5. Cambridge , England .. 3812

6. Epinal , France American Cemetery. A total of 5525

7. Flanders Field , Belgium .. A total of 368

8. Florence , Italy . A total of 4402

9. Henri-Chapelle , Belgium . A total of 7992

10. Lorraine , France . A total of 10,489

11. Luxembourg , Luxembourg. A total of 5076

12. Meuse-Argonne. A total of 14246

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13. Netherlands , Netherlands . A total of 8301

14. Normandy , France . A total of 9387

15. Oise-Aisne , France . A total of 6012

16. Rhone , France . A total of 861

17. Sicily , Italy. A total of 7861

18. Somme , France . A total of 1844

19. St.. Mihiel , France . A total of 4153

20. Suresnes , France . a total of 1541

Apologize to no one.

Remind those of our sacrifice and don't

confuse arrogance with leadership.

The count is 104,366

dead brave Americans.

And we have to watch an

American elected leader who

apologizes to Europe and the

Middle East that our country is

"arrogant"!

HOW MANY FRENCH, DUTCH, ITALIANS,

BELGIANS AND BRITS ARE BURIED ON

OUR SOIL, DEFENDING US AGAINST OUR

ENEMIES?

WE DON'T ASK FOR PRAISE ... BUT WE

HAVE ABSOULUTELY NO NEED TO

APOLOGIZE!!

PLEASE---- DO NOT DELETE, DO

THINK ABOUT THIS. THANK YOU.

I hope you remember

this when election time

comes around again..

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On Memorial Day please remember these fallen American hero's that gave their all for our freedoms....

1. The American Cemetery at Aisne-Marne,

France.. A total of 2289

2. The American Cemetery at Ardennes , Belgium .

A total of 5329

3. The American Cemetery at Brittany, France .

A total of 4410

4. Brookwood , England American Cemetery. A total of 468

5. Cambridge , England .. 3812

6. Epinal , France American Cemetery. A total of 5525

7. Flanders Field , Belgium .. A total of 368

8. Florence , Italy . A total of 4402

9. Henri-Chapelle , Belgium . A total of 7992

10. Lorraine , France . A total of 10,489

11. Luxembourg , Luxembourg. A total of 5076

12. Meuse-Argonne. A total of 14246

post-300-127487800061_thumb.jpg

13. Netherlands , Netherlands . A total of 8301

14. Normandy , France . A total of 9387

15. Oise-Aisne , France . A total of 6012

16. Rhone , France . A total of 861

17. Sicily , Italy. A total of 7861

18. Somme , France . A total of 1844

19. St.. Mihiel , France . A total of 4153

20. Suresnes , France . a total of 1541

Apologize to no one.

Remind those of our sacrifice and don't

confuse arrogance with leadership.

The count is 104,366

dead brave Americans.

And we have to watch an

American elected leader who

apologizes to Europe and the

Middle East that our country is

"arrogant"!

HOW MANY FRENCH, DUTCH, ITALIANS,

BELGIANS AND BRITS ARE BURIED ON

OUR SOIL, DEFENDING US AGAINST OUR

ENEMIES?

WE DON'T ASK FOR PRAISE ... BUT WE

HAVE ABSOULUTELY NO NEED TO

APOLOGIZE!!

PLEASE---- DO NOT DELETE, DO

THINK ABOUT THIS. THANK YOU.

I hope you remember

this when election time

comes around again..

Fly here with Google Earth for a somber reminder of our history...

Normandy , France: 49°21'33.51"N 0°51'12.27"W

hover your pointer over the blue squares...red beach...fox beach...gun bunkers....

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made me feel good........ brothers in arms!

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Those Texas Brothers are great....if I lived there I would be doing the same thing...

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Army's 235th Birthday

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America's First Team

Members of America's First Team participates in a Division Run at Fort Hood, Texas in celebration of the Army's birthday.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY ARMY VETS!!!!

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> A Poem Worth Reading

>

> He was getting old and paunchy

> And his hair was falling fast,

> And he sat around the Legion,

> Telling stories of the past.

>

> Of a war that he once fought in

> And the deeds that he had done,

> In his exploits with his buddies;

> They were heroes, every one.

>

> And 'tho sometimes to his neighbors

> His tales became a joke,

> All his buddies listened quietly

> For they knew where of he spoke.

>

> But we'll hear his tales no longer,

> For ol' Bob has passed away,

> And the world's a little poorer

> For a Soldier died today.

>

> He won't be mourned by many,

> Just his children and his wife.

> For he lived an ordinary,

> Very quiet sort of life.

> He held a job and raised a family,

> Going quietly on his way;

> And the world won't note his passing,

> 'Tho a Soldier died today.

>

> When politicians leave this earth,

> Their bodies lie in state,

> While thousands note their passing,

> And proclaim that they were great.

>

> Papers tell of their life stories

> From the time that they wereyoung

> But the passing of a Soldier

> Goes unnoticed, and unsung.

>

> Is the greatest contribution

> To the welfare of our land,

> Some jerk who breaks his promise

> And cons his fellow man?

>

> Or the ordinary fellow

> Who in times of war and strife,

> Goes off to serve his country

> And offers up his life?

>

> The politician's stipend

> And the style in which he lives,

> Are often disproportionate,

> To the service that he gives.

>

> While the ordinary Soldier,

> Who offered up his all,

> Is paid off with a medal

> And perhaps a pension, small.

>

> It's so easy to forget them,

> For it is so many times

> That our Bobs and Jims and Johnnys,

> Went to battle, but we know,

>

> It is not the politicians

> With their compromise and ploys,

> Who won for us the freedom

> That our country now enjoys.

>

> Should you find yourself in danger,

> With your enemies at hand,

> Would you really want some cop-out,

> With his ever waffling stand?

>

> Or would you want a Soldier--

> His home, his country, his kin,

> Just a common Soldier,

> Who would fight until the end.

>

> He was just a common Soldier,

> And his ranks are growing thin,

> But his presence should remind us

> We may need his like again.

>

> For when countries are in conflict,

> We find the Soldier's part

> Is to clean up all the troubles

> That the politicians start.

>

> If we cannot do him honor

> While he's here to hear the praise,

> Then at least let's give him homage

> At the ending of his days.

>

> Perhaps just a simple headline

> In the paper that might say:

>

> "OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING,

>

> A SOLDIER DIED TODAY."

>

> Pass On The Patriotism!

> YOU can make a difference

>

> A veteran is someone who, at one point in his life,

> wrote a blank check made payable to

>

> 'The United States ofAmerica'

> for an amount "up to and including my life."

> That is Honor, and there are way too many people in this country who

no

> longer understand it.

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WW II Trivia

You might enjoy this from Col D. G. Swinford, USMC, Ret and history buff. You would really have to dig deep to get this kind of ringside seat to history:

1. The first German serviceman killed in WW II was killed by the Japanese ( China , 1937), the first American serviceman killed was killed by the Russians ( Finland 1940); highest ranking American killed was Lt Gen Lesley McNair, killed by the US Army Air Corps. So much for allies.

2. The youngest US serviceman was 12 year old Calvin Graham, USN. He was wounded and given a Dishonorable Discharge for lying about his age. His benefits were later restored by act of Congress.

3. At the time of Pearl Harbor, the top US Navy command was called CINCUS (pronounced 'sink us'), the shoulder patch of the US Army's 45th Infantry division was the Swastika, and Hitler's private train was named 'Amerika.' All three were soon changed for PR purposes.

4. More US servicemen died in the Air Corps than the Marine Corps. While completing the required 30 missions, your chance of being killed was 71%.

5. Generally speaking, there was no such thing as an average fighter pilot. You were either an ace or a target. For instance, Japanese Ace Hiroyoshi Nishizawa shot down over 80 planes. He died while a passenger on a cargo plane.

6. It was a common practice on fighter planes to load every 5th round with a tracer round to aid in aiming. This was a mistake. Tracers had different ballistics so (at long range) if your tracers were hitting the target 80% of your rounds were missing. Worse yet tracers instantly told your enemy he was under fire and from which direction. Worst of all was the practice of loading a string of tracers at the end of the belt to tell you that you were out of ammo. This was definitely not something you wanted to tell the enemy. Units that stopped using tracers saw their success rate nearly double and their loss rate go down.

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There are special people that we know....now and then if we're lucky

we get to meet one....be thankful we have folks like this....

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Honor our Marines..........

Lindsay Lohan, 24, gets her name and face all over the news because she went to jail.

Justin Allen, 23, Brett Linley, 29, Matthew Weikert, 29, Justus Bartett, 27, Dave Santos, 21, Chase Stanley, 21, Jesse Reed, 26, Matthew Johnson, 21, Zachary Fisher, 24, Brandon King, 23, Christopher Goeke, 23, and Sheldon Tate, 27, are all Marines that gave their lives for you this week.

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Don,

I don't reply to often in your top 3 threads, AMERICA'S HERO'S, HONOR THE FALLEN, AMERICAN WARRIORS-PAST AND PRESENT, but I read every post, I don't reply because I have a hard time typing anything because of the lump in my throat and my impaired vision after reading them.

Thanks for posting,

Skip

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Your not alone in your feelings Skip...I believe everyone that

reads these post are affected the same way....I certainly am...

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International Picture of the Year. Here are two very touching photos honored this year.

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First Place

Todd Heisler The Rocky Mountain News

When 2nd Lt. James Cathey's body arrived at the Reno Airport, Marines climbed into the cargo hold of the plane and draped the flag over his casket as passengers watched the family gather on the tarmac.

During the arrival of another Marine's casket last year at Denver International Airport, Major Steve Beck described the scene as so powerful: 'See the people in the windows? They sat right there in the plane, watching those Marines. You gotta wonder what's going through their minds, knowing that they're on the plane that brought him home,' he said 'They will remember being on that plane for the rest of their lives. They're going to remember bringing that Marine home. And they should.'

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Second Place

Todd Heisler The Rocky Mountain News

The night before the burial of her husband's body, Katherine Cathey refused to leave the casket, asking to sleep next to his body for the last time. The Marines made a bed for her, tucking in the sheets below the flag. Before she fell asleep, she opened her laptop computer and played songs that reminded her of 'Cat,' and one of the Marines asked if she wanted them to continue standing watch as she slept. 'I think it would be kind of nice if you kept doing it,' she said. 'I think that's what he would have wanted'

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Lilly Friedman doesn't remember the last name of the woman who designed and sewed the wedding gown she wore when she walked down the aisle over 60 years ago. But the grandmother of seven does recall that, when she first told her fiancé Ludwig that she had always dreamed of being married in a white gown, he realized he had his work cut out for him. For the tall, lanky 21-year-old who had survived hunger, disease, and torture, this was a different kind of challenge.

How was he ever going to find such a dress in the Bergen Belsen Displaced Person's camp where they felt grateful for the clothes on their backs?

God would intervene in the guise of a former German pilot who walked into the food distribution center where Ludwig worked, eager to make a trade for his worthless parachute. In exchange for two pounds of coffee beans and a couple of packs of cigarettes, Lilly would have her wedding gown.

For two weeks Miriam the seamstress worked under the curious eyes of her fellow DPs, carefully fashioning the six parachute panels into a simple, long-sleeved gown with a rolled collar and a fitted waist that tied in the back with a bow. When the dress was completed, she sewed the leftover material into a matching shirt for the groom.

A white wedding gown may have seemed like a frivolous request in the surreal environment of the camps, but for Lilly the dress symbolized the innocent, normal life she and her family had once led before the world descended into madness.

Lilly and her siblings were raised in a Torah-observant home in the small town of Zarica, Czechoslovakia, where her father was a Melamed, respected and well liked by the young Yeshiva students he taught in nearby Irsheva.

He and his two sons were marked for extermination immediately upon arriving at Auschwitz. For Lilly and her sisters, it was only their first stop on their long journey of persecution, which included Plashof, Neustadt, Gross Rosen, and finally Bergen Belsen

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Lilly Friedman and her parachute dress on display in the Bergen Belsen Museum

Four-hundred people marched 15 miles in the snow to the town of Celle on January 27, 1946, to attend Lilly and Ludwig's wedding. The town synagogue, damaged and desecrated, had been lovingly renovated by the DPs with the meager materials available to them. When a Sefer Torah arrived from England, they converted

an old kitchen cabinet into a makeshift Aron Kodesh.

"My sisters and I lost everything--our parents, our two brothers, our homes.

The most important thing was to build a new home."

Six months later, Lilly's sister Ilona wore the dress when she married Max Traeger.

After that came Cousin Rosie. How many brides wore Lilly's dress? "I stopped counting after 17."

With the camps experiencing the highest marriage rate in the world, Lilly's gown was in great demand.

In 1948, when President Harry Truman finally permitted the 100,000 Jews who had been languishing in DP camps since the end of the war to emigrate, the gown accompanied Lilly across the ocean to America.

Unable to part with her dress, it lay at the bottom of her bedroom closet for the next 50 years, "not even good enough for a garage sale. I was happy when it found such a good home."

Home was the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

When Lily's niece, a volunteer, told museum officials about her aunt's dress, they immediately recognized its historical significance and displayed the gown in a specially designed showcase, guaranteed to preserve it for 500 years.

But Lilly Friedman's dress had one more journey to make.

Bergen Belsen, the museum, opened its doors on October 28, 2007.

The German government invited Lilly and her sisters to be their guests for the grand opening.

They initially declined, but finally traveled to Hanover the following year with their children, their grandchildren, and extended families to view the extraordinary exhibit created for the wedding dress made from a parachute.

Lilly's family, who were all familiar with the stories about the wedding in Celle, were eager to visit the synagogue. They found the building had been completely renovated and modernized. But, when they pulled aside the handsome curtain, they were astounded to find that the Aron Kodesh, made from a kitchen cabinet, had remained untouched as a testament to the profound faith of the survivors.

As Lilly stood on the bimah once again, she beckoned to her granddaughter, Jackie, to stand beside her where she was once a kallah. "It was an emotional trip. We cried a lot."

Two weeks later, the woman who had once stood trembling before the selective eyes of the infamous Dr. Josef Mengele, returned home and witnessed the marriage of her granddaughter.

The three Lax sisters--Lilly, Ilona and Eva, who together survived Auschwitz,

a forced labor camp, a death march, and Bergen Belsen--have remained close and today live within walking distance of each other in Brooklyn.

As mere teenagers, they managed to outwit and outlive a monstrous killing machine,

then went on to marry, have children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren and were utimately honored by the country that had earmarked them for extinction.

As young brides, they had stood underneath the chuppah and recited the blessings

that their ancestors had been saying for thousands of years.

In doing so, they chose to honor the legacy of those who had perished by choosing life.

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In MEMORIAM - 63 YEARS LATER

It is now more than 60 years after the Second World War in Europe ended

This e-mail is being sent as a memorial chain, in memory of the six million Jews, 20 million Russians,

10 million Christians, and 1,900 Catholic priests who were murdered, massacred, raped, burned,

starved, and humiliated with the people looking the other way!

Now, more than ever, with Iran and others, claiming the Holocaust to be 'a myth,'

it's imperative to make sure the world never forgets,

because there are others who would like to do it again.

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Thanks Don!

I lost a Uncle I never knew on Iwo Jima's beaches, he was a Gunnery Sergeant USMC, Uncle Wayne.

Skip

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Thanks Don!

I lost a Uncle I never knew on Iwo Jima's beaches, he was a Gunnery Sergeant USMC, Uncle Wayne.

Skip

Took some very brave men to charge those beaches knowing there was going to be a slaughter...

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USS EMMONS...

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The USS Emmons served the United States proudly through World War II, right up until April 6, 1945, when it was attacked by five kamikaze pilots off the coast of Okinawa. One day later, the U.S. Navy sank the destroyer to prevent it from falling into the hands of the Japanese.

The bodies of 60 American sailors went down with the ship.

For 65 years, the Emmons lay peacefully on the ocean floor, guns raised skyward -- until recently, when divers discovered that the ship had been vandalized. Its builder’s plaque -- the metal plate and vessel’s “birth certificate” -- had been removed.

A ship’s “data plaque” was usually a brass plate cast or embossed with information on the ship's significant dates and builder,” Warman’s Guide to WWII Collectibles author John Graf told FoxNews.com. "Usually, there would be just one made for each ship, so each example tends to be unique and command collector interest.”

Naturally, we’re very upset because we feel that it's ours, it's our ship," said Ed Hoffman, 85, one of the handful of the Emmons' original crew members – "one of the young ones," he says.

"There were six of us in the pilot house; only two of us got out," Hoffman recalled in an interview with FoxNews.com.

“That ship is a resting place,” another survivor, 92 year-old Harold Jay, told FoxNews.com. “Those men deserve our respect.”

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BLACK GERMAN HOLOCAUST VICTIMS

So much of our history is lost to us because we often don’t write the history books, don’t film the documentaries, or don’t pass the accounts down from generation to generation.

One documentary now touring the film festival circuit, telling us to “Always Remember” is “Black Survivors of the Holocaust” (1997). Outside the U.S.., the film is entitled “Hitler’s Forgotten Victims” (Afro-Wisdom Productions). It codifies another dimension to the “Never Forget “ Holocaust story—our dimension.

Did you know that in the 1920’s, there were 24,000 Blacks living in Germany? Neither did I. Here’s how it happened, and how many of them were eventually caught unawares by the events of the Holocaust. Like most West European nations, Germany established colonies in Africa in the late 1800’s in what later became Togo, Cameroon, Namibia, and Tanzania. German genetic experiments began there, most notably involving prisoners taken from the 1904 Heroro Massacre that left 60,000 Africans dead, following a 4-year revolt against German colonization. After the shellacking Germany received in World War I,it was stripped of its African colonies in 1918.

As a spoil of war, the French were allowed to occupy Germany in the Rhineland—a bitter piece of real estate that has gone back and forth between the two nations for centuries. The French willfully deployed their own colonized African soldiers as the occupying force. Germans viewed this as the final insult of World War I, and, soon thereafter, 92% of them voted in the Nazi party. Hundreds of the African Rhineland-based soldiers intermarried with German women and raised their children as Black Germans. In MeinKampf, Hitler wrote about his plans for these “Rhineland Bastards”.

When he came to power, one of his first directives was aimed at these mixed-race children. Underscoring Hitler’s obsession with racial purity, by 1937, every identified mixed-race child in the Rhineland had been forcibly sterilized, in order to prevent further “race polluting”, as Hitler termed it.

Hans Hauck, a Black Holocaust survivor and a victim of Hitler’s mandatory sterilization program, explained in the film “Hitler’s Forgotten Victims” that, when he was forced to undergo sterilization as a teenager, he was given no anesthetic. Once he received his sterilization certificate, he was “free to go”, so long as he agreed to have no sexual relations whatsoever with Germans.

Although most Black Germans attempted to escape their fatherland, heading for France where people like Josephine Baker were steadily aiding and supporting the French Underground, many still encountered problems elsewhere.. Nations shut their doors to Germans, including the Black ones.

Some Black Germans were able to eke out a living during Hitler’s reign of terror by performing in Vaudeville shows, but many Blacks, steadfast in their belief that they were German first, Black second, opted to remain in Germany. Some fought with the Nazis (a few even became Lut waffe pilots)! Unfortunately, many Black Germans were arrested, charged with treason, and shipped in cattle cars to concentration camps. Often these trains were so packed with people and (equipped with no bathroom facilities or food), that, after the four-day journey, box car doors were opened to piles of the dead and dying.

Once inside the concentration camps, Blacks were given the worst jobs conceivable. Some Black American soldiers, who were captured and held as prisoners of war, recounted that, while they were being starved and forced into dangerous labor (violating the Geneva Convention), they were still better off than Black German concentration camp detainees, who were forced to do the unthinkable--man the crematoriums and work in labs where genetic experiments were being conducted. As a final sacrifice, these Blacks were killed every three months so that they would never be able to reveal the inner workings of the “Final Solution”.

In every story of Black oppression, no matter how we were enslaved, shackled, or beaten, we always found a way to survive and to rescue others. As a case in point, consider Johnny Voste, a Belgian resistance fighter who was arrested in 1942 for alleged sabotage and then shipped to Dachau . One of his jobs was stacking vitamin crates. Risking his own life, he distributed hundreds of vitamins to camp detainees, which saved the lives of many who were starving, weak, and ill—conditions exacerbated by extreme vitamin deficiencies. His motto was “No, you can’t have my life; I will fight for it.”

According to Essex University’s Delroy Constantine-Simms, there were Black Germans who resisted Nazi Germany, such as Lari Gilges, who founded the Northwest Rann—an organization of entertainers that fought the Nazis in his home town of Dusseldorf—and who was murdered by the SS in 1933, the year that Hitler came into power.

Little information remains about the numbers of Black Germans held in the camps or killed under the Nazi regime. Some victims of the Nazi sterilization project and Black survivors of the Holocaust are still alive and telling their story in films such as “Black Survivors of the Nazi Holocaust”, but they must also speak out for justice, not just history.

Unlike Jews (in Israel and in Germany ), Black Germans receive no war reparations because their German citizenship was revoked (even though they were German-born). The only pension they get is from those of us who are willing to tell the world their stories and continue their battle for recognition and compensation.

After the war, scores of Blacks who had somehow managed to survive the Nazi regime, were rounded up and tried as war criminals. Talk about the final insult! There are thousands of Black Holocaust stories, from the triangle trade, to slavery in America, to the gas oven s in Germany .

We often shy away from hearing about our historical past because so much of it is painful; however, we are in this struggle together for rights, dignity, and, yes, reparations for wrongs done to us through the centuries. We need to always remember so that we can take steps to ensure that these atrocities never happen again.

For further information, read: Destined to Witness: Growing Up Black in Nazi Germany, by Hans J. Massaquoi.

PLEASE PASS THIS ON, AND ALWAYS REMEMBER...LEST WE FORGET!

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DO YOU KNOW WHAT THIS IS? OR WHERE THIS IS?

THE STATUE

This statue currently stands outside the Iraqi palace, now home to the 4th Infantry division. It will eventually be shipped home and put in the memorial museum in Fort Hood , Texas

The statue was created by an Iraqi artist named Kalat, who for years was forced by Saddam Hussein to make the many hundreds of bronze busts of Saddam that dotted Baghdad

Kalat was so grateful for the Americans liberation of his country; he melted 3 of the heads of the fallen Saddam and made the statue as a memorial to the American soldiers and their fallen warriors

Kalat worked on this memorial night and day for several months.

To the left of the kneeling soldier is a small Iraqi girl giving the soldier comfort as he mourns the loss of his comrade in arms.

Do you know why we don't hear about this in the news? Because it is heart warming and praise worthy..

The media avoids it because it does not have the shock effect. But we can do something about it.

We can pass this along to as many people as we can in honor of all our brave military who are making a difference.

And please pass this on!

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