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Idaho Jim

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Everything posted by Idaho Jim

  1. Idaho Jim

    Awesome new technology we're enjoying

    Never heard of Devil's Claw, Homey. I'll have to look into that. Jim
  2. Idaho Jim

    Awesome new technology we're enjoying

    Looking forward to trying it, Unc. I'm really pain-tolerant, but this sciatica, is driving me up the wall. Ibuprofen handles it, but I hate taking it constantly. Jim
  3. Idaho Jim

    Awesome new technology we're enjoying

    I just ordered a small bottle. I assume it comes with instructions. I'm having a lot of pain in my hip...according to the docs, probably sciatica. Figured I might as well give it a try. Jim
  4. Idaho Jim

    New video of my Sweep Jig....

    Ya know, Saul, I've noticed that "selective" hearing isn't all it's cracked up to be...LOL In my case it seems to select what I don't want to hear instead of the other way around. Jim
  5. Went down along the Utah border last weekend. Visited an old gold/silver mine looking for pyrite nuggets. Ran the Sweep Jig (patent pending) dry to see if it could recover the pyrite. Obviously, it did OK. I'm wondering about the "coppery" color. If anybody knows what that is, I'd appreciate the info. The GMT doesn't detect the nuggets, but easily "sees" the coppery sand. https://youtu.be/UDATYX62tt4 Jim
  6. Idaho Jim

    New video of my Sweep Jig....

    LOL...my poor hearing is a blessing at times, but I had no trouble hearing that squeak. tried to get rid of it as best I could in the viodeo, but I guess from what I'm hearing from everybody, I failed....Ha. Maybe I should be marketing an elk bugle. Jim
  7. Idaho Jim

    New video of my Sweep Jig....

    Thanks, Bob. The actual concept occurred to me last August, but I'd been working on dry gem recovery for about 8 years, building 8 or 10 different designs. As it turns out, you can't recover gems dry. A physics phenomenon called "Granular Convection" aka "the Brazil Nut Effect, prevents it. So I built this for that purpose (not being aware of GC), and when it didn't work for gems I tried it for gold, and it worked great. A few bugs to work out, and it's now a pretty nice little wet/dry gold machine that can be built in almost any size. I sell the 18" unit for $550 + shipping, with a solid body of HDPE corrugated pipe. That model weighs 19lbs. The one I use myself is a skeletonized version that sells for $650 + shipping. It only weighs 11lbs. I'm amazed myself at how well these perform. They only draw about 1 amp, so can get by with a fairly small battery pack, and when used wet, they require very little water...just enough to keep the material on the diaphragm sort of soupy. Water has no impact on the recovery...that's all in the mechanical action.
  8. Idaho Jim

    New video of my Sweep Jig....

    LOL...there's a thought! Yes, this has been used at Bonanza bar on the Snake River to recover flour. Video here:Sweep Jig at Bonanza Bar The biggest gold on the Snake is about 50 mesh, and not much of that. Most is sub-100 and smaller. I also ran it at the LDMA/GPAA outing at the Blue Bucket in May. Actually recovered black sand and gold from damp tailings without water. Using water, in a demo, recovered 100% of black sand and gold in front of several miners. Asked to re-run the tails and found zero black sand or gold. Jim
  9. Idaho Jim

    New video of my Sweep Jig....

    Yup...I'm starting to believe there's graphite in this stuff. The sand is definitely conductive, but not at all magnetic. None, zero, nada response to a magnet. That means it's conductive, without iron, and it's probable the conductive element is graphite. I retried the GMT on it, and it detects both the nuggets and the dried sand. But, the GMT indicates the probability of iron at 70%. But that just means the phase shift is close to the iron range. Doesn't mean definite proof the material has a high iron content. Another thing arguing in favor of graphite is the streak test....almost black, and it glides across the surface as easily as a pencil. So, probably the black in the sand is graphite, and the coppery color is some sort of pyrite....judging by the color maybe chalcopyrite. What I'm the happiest about, however, is how well the Sweep Jig recovered those fines while running dry. If there was free gold there, it would have recovered it. That's what the trip was all about. That, and the recovery of some nice pyrite specimens. I'm sure I'll go back, but I'm taking the chainsaw next time...LOL Jim
  10. Idaho Jim

    New video of my Sweep Jig....

    I have no idea, Jack. The tailings are all a dark gray color. The geo report said the mine had limonite, shale, metasedimentary quartzite, etc. Whatever it is has a really oily look to it, and the material I dumped out of the tubs last night has a very black, shiny appearance this morning. I know it's hard to get off my hands....really gets into the pores of the skin. I'm assuming the dark gray material was the shale. I find it a little strange that ALL the tailings are the same dark gray material....very little other gravel, like quartz, etc. I know the belt of material it comes from is a metasedimentary quartzite. That belt extends about 6 or 7 miles into Idaho, and is about 1 mile wide. Lots of quartzite intrusions in the belt. Lots of prospecting of the belt, but not much to show for it, at least in Idaho. Jim
  11. Idaho Jim

    New video of my Sweep Jig....

    Many thanks, guys! I hate greasing these bushings...it just collects dust, but I'm making an exception in this case...LOL. Actually, I need to either go back to the UHMW plastic bushings, or try the HDPE. obviously, the Delrin against aluminum isn't going to work...LOL Jim
  12. Idaho Jim

    New video of my Sweep Jig....

    AAhhh, that's what it is. I wondered about the copper color. Many thanks! BLM's records show no mention of copper at that mine. That's really interesting. The sweep jig is something I developed late last summer, and through the winter. It is the absolute nuts! Works wet or dry, and recovers a very high percentage of flour gold. I applied for a patent in January. We'll see how it goes. It allows me to prospect places I'd passed by before. I've sold two of them...one to a guy in Edmonton who is using it on the NSR, and one last week to a guy in Arizona. He's got an old mine tailing pile, with gold, but no water. I'm looking forward to his reports. He also plans on taking it to the beach in Oregon next month. Here's a pic of another rock I found a few years ago about a mile from the mine. It also has a coppery sheen, and feels waxy. I thought it might be a mica schist, but now you've got me wondering. These rocks are only found in a small area of maybe an acre. really strange. Some of them are as big as a bathtub. A detector does not see them.
  13. Idaho Jim

    Near UV Flash Light

    Hmmm...I've never even thought of the surge issue....LOL Maybe I should have. I built two 12v packs for mine. They're NiCad's. Each one is 10 'D' size batteries. Each pack will run mine about 1 1/2 hours with both bulbs on. I usually only run the LW as I'm looking for gems. I use the SW occasionally just to get an idea of the general fluorescence of the minerals in the area I'm working. I'm getting old anyway, and I find that 3 hours of fluorescent prospecting is about all I can do in one night anyway. I wonder how one of those Li-ion auto-starter boosters would work? Jim
  14. Idaho Jim

    Near UV Flash Light

    What I'd like to do with mine is separate the ballasts from the bulbs. Have the bulbs on a wand, like a detector, and the rest in the control box with a belt, or chest mount. That setup would be the nuts. I've used mine with a wand, but trying to swing that 4 or 5LB weight on a wand is really tiring, even with a support strap. Jim.
  15. Idaho Jim

    Near UV Flash Light

    Yup. I'm thinking it probably had the same setup as mine, at one time. Either filament, or both could be on. Jim
  16. Idaho Jim

    Near UV Flash Light

    Yup...don't want SW on your skin, especially. Fortunately I live at high elevation, and usually UV prospect even higher, so it's cool enough at night, I usually have a coat on, or at least a long-sleeved shirt. Jim
  17. Idaho Jim

    Near UV Flash Light

    It may be that I'm extra sensitive to UV, though others have reported the same problem. It may also be that the reason I don't have symptoms from sunlight is the white light produced by the sun mitigates the UV sensitivity. So, when the only light is UV, I get sick. The goggles block the UV, so they make a big difference for me. Apparently about 1/3 of the population is sensitive to UV to some extent. I've never noticed any special sensitivity to fluorescent lighting....just UV at night. Jim
  18. Idaho Jim

    Near UV Flash Light

    Naahh...I never look directly into the light. What I read said that most UV fluoresecent bulbs produce a violet light that eyes have trouble with. It may be I'm in the minority on this, but " Way Too Cool" sells the goggles, so obviously there's a known problem that has nothing to do with damage to your eyes. The goggles filter out the portion (spectrum) of the light that is causing the problem. Several years ago there were a considerable number of posts, on one forum or another, talking about this problem. It's a well-known issue. I remember one guy even said he'd used clear motorcycle goggles, and that helped. Jim Jim
  19. Idaho Jim

    Near UV Flash Light

    Nope...it's a real thing. When I mentioned it on a couple of other forums I had people chime in a explain why i was getting sick. it definitely is the focus problem of your eyes. I don't notice it with the LW LED flashlights, but I haven't spent much general scanning time with them. It's possible not everybody has the problem. Some people can read in a moving vehicle;...I can't. I get carsick if I read for more than a couple of minutes. I'm sure there are people who, even though their eyes may be straining, don't get sick from it. People are not the same...LOL Jim
  20. Idaho Jim

    Near UV Flash Light

    Something I haven't seen mentioned here is how sick UV lights will make you. The first time I used mine, I noticed that I started feeling really nauseous within about an hour. Couldn't figure out what was going on. Second night was the same. I had ordered a couple pair of special goggles with mine, but hadn't used them. Finally tried them, and it helped a lot, but still a slight sick feeling. Apparently, our eyes can't focus UV light very well, so you get sort of "carsick" from the continuous effort of your eyes to focus. For me the SW was worse than the LW. The goggles definitely help. Jim
  21. Idaho Jim

    Near UV Flash Light

    I'm thinking it's using a single bulb to do both SW and LW UV. I'm not sure which portion of the bulb is which, but I'd bet that's what's going on. As mentioned in that quote above, the SW is filtered out by the phosphor coating, so the upper portion of the bulb in your pic is probably the Long Wave emitter, and the lower, uncoated portion is the Shortwave emitter. In mine, I have separate bulbs, and can turn them on and off individually. Shortwave is UV/C. Longwave is UV/A. Jim
  22. Idaho Jim

    Near UV Flash Light

    It may be that one of your bulbs is short wave UV, and uses a quartz bulb. here's a quote from another site linked below. UV lights Fluorescent Blacklights There are fluorescent tubes that emit UV. The phosphor coating on the inner surface of the tube absorbs the UVC emitted by the low pressure mercury arc, and emits longer UV wavelengths. There are at least six different UV-emitting phosphors used in fluorescent lamps. One common lamp is the ""BLB" fluorescent lamp. The tubing is made from a very deep violet-blue glass known as "Wood's glass". The tubing is quite transparent to medium and longer UVA wavelengths, and shorter visible violet wavelengths, and a fairly broad range of infrared and the longest, least visible red wavelengths. These tubes emit lots of UV mainly between 350 and 375 nanometers, some of the 404.7 and dimmer 407.8 nM violet mercury lines, and just enough of the blue 435.8 nM mercury line to have a basically blue color when lit. The "BLB" lamps are used for special effects due to their ability to make fluorescent objects glow very brightly. There is a less common deep-blue-violet lamp with no phosphor and made with special glass (maybe quartz) to transmit the 253.7 nM UVC (shortwave UV) mercury line. These lamps are generally used to make fluorescent rocks glow. There are UV fluorescent lamps with glass not dyed to block visible light. This includes the BL and the similar 350BL. These are often used to attract insects into electric insect killers. The 350BL has a broader spectrum peaking at a slightly shorter wavelength (350 nanometers) than the BL does, and is supposedly more attractive to insects than the BL. There are other ultraviolet lamps such as UVB medicinal lamps and UVA suntanning lamps. There are also the similar fluorescent actinic lamps, producing long UV wavelengths and/or visible violet. These are sometimes used in some special photographic and printing processes. One of these is the 03, specializing in producing visible violet light. The 03 is also used in reef aquariums with live coral since coral utilizes violet and deep blue wavelengths. The 03 actinic will cause fluorescence of most fluorescent dyes, pigments and paints, especially other than ones which fluoresce blue.
  23. Idaho Jim

    Near UV Flash Light

    Bob, I don't have a clue. My understanding is the filter is the black-looking flat lens the bulb shines through. (it's actually deep red). The filter blocks white light, so the fluorescence shows up better. I think the exterior of the bulbs is some sort of quartz. I also seem to remember something about regular glass blocking UV light...that's why the quartz bulb, rather than glass. It may be you're seeing some quartz crystals in the bulb, but I don't know. I'll do little digging (no pun intended), and see what i can find out. Jim
  24. Idaho Jim

    Near UV Flash Light

    Yes, Dave, that's why the big units are so spendy. And, to top it off, the filters have a finite life. I don't remember how many hours of use you get...used to know all that stuff, but now I'm old. Jim
  25. Idaho Jim

    Near UV Flash Light

    Homey, for my use an LED would have worked well enough. Especially one of the Way Too Cool LED's. But, they didn't have them when I bought mine. Most gemstones fluoresce under LW, so the LED works good for that. For general mineral fluorescence, the SW is better. It's like detectors...depends on the ground, and what you're trying to find. Jim
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