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Bedrock Bob

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Everything posted by Bedrock Bob

  1. That's just nasty bro.
  2. Bedrock Bob

    Bur Abor strewn field ,kenya

    In the desert there is not much to do except sit around the burning bush and ponder things while your belly growls. You can get a lot of stuff figured out that way. I think the desert makes philosophers out of a lot of us. I can think of a few real famous ones in particular. It makes meteorite hunters, gold prospectors and gardeners too. I guess that depends a lot on the raw material it has to work with.
  3. Bedrock Bob

    Unusual erosion

    Can I take a crack at it? It looks like that rock was against another rock and had some chemistry. They kind of bonded over the years and cemented together. Then mechanical erosion broke them apart. That cement they created between them was a bit tougher than the host rock and burnished up. You are seeing the broken joint between this and another rock. That is what I would say caused that spot on your rock.
  4. Bedrock Bob

    Bur Abor strewn field ,kenya

    Some men want to find. Other men want to be. Some hunt for meteorites. Others for validation. Men who find must dwell in reality. They have no patience for make-believe. It is an obstacle to a very real objective. Men who want to be dwell in fantasy. They spend the balance of their time supporting their stories and bickering over the details surrounding them. Fantasy is the only place they exist for they are not what they profess to be. Both types of men can grow a nice garden. Only one makes a good meteorite hunter. JMHO. Bedrock Bob
  5. Bedrock Bob

    Bur Abor strewn field ,kenya

    Jimalito, You should go out and find a meteorite like your neighbor did.
  6. Bedrock Bob

    Bur Abor strewn field ,kenya

    ...You are asking the guy that posted a photo of a big African iron to apologize? After you post photos of bricks and sandstone? That is rich Jimalito! Now we know where your photos of the pallasites came from. Your neighbor.
  7. Bedrock Bob

    Red

    Morlock, I think it is important for guys learning to identify minerals to say WHY they think a mineral is what they say it is. In that way other guys can learn some sort of methodology for identification. If we just post some goofy mineral name and nothing else there is no attempt to learn nor spread knowledge. And very rarely do we ever know exactly who is right. It kinda becomes a vote. And that is a poor way to identify a mineral. I noticed you told us WHY you thought this was iron stained quartz. You went out on a limb and discussed your methodology for arriving at your answer. And that is a very valuable gift to give. No matter what the mineral is others learned from your post. Thank you! Bob
  8. Bedrock Bob

    Red

    What a good observation! And I agree! I thought the same thing when the color seemed to be through the mineral. And then I noticed the crystal structure. And the crystals looked strange for quartz. You will notice those darker ones look short and flat rather tall, pointy and terminated. It looks like the perfect environment for tall quartz but you have those blocky little red crystals with a flat top haircut. So not knowing exactly what I was talking about I did the probablility guess. Two things made me think these might not be quartz. The shape of the crystal and the translucent color. So based on "two strikes for quartz" and a complete ignorance of the crystal structure of any red mineral I made my assertion. In other words I am rolling the bones. So my bet is that those translucent red crystals with the short structure and striated planes are some other mineral than quartz. And until someone proves me wrong that is just how it is!
  9. Bedrock Bob

    Bur Abor strewn field ,kenya

    Yes, but he can't seem to walk past the brick. So we might be dealing with two different problems here.
  10. Bedrock Bob

    Red

    You are wrong Morlock. My opinion is that those crystals aren't "stained". That is a red mineral and not "stained" quartz. You can see quartz crystals but you can also see other short crystals with striated faces that don't look like quartz to me. Exactly what it is I don't know. But I think you have a red mineral in there. Not just quartz stained with hematite. JMHO.
  11. Bedrock Bob

    Bur Abor strewn field ,kenya

    Yes, he has heart and he is diligent. He is driven. He will learn what a meteorite looks like sooner or later and get himself a decent camera. He has everything it takes to hunt meteorites except the ability to be wrong and he will develop that skill after he is wrong enough times.
  12. Bedrock Bob

    Bur Abor strewn field ,kenya

    That is a meteorite. No BS.
  13. Bedrock Bob

    Opinion?

    I sure don't know very much about it. I am just a know-it-all. I like discussing rocks though and seeing what other guys are looking at and dealing with. They look just like the rocks I pick up and consider as a met. So thanks for showing it to us!
  14. Bedrock Bob

    Mineral identification requests

    That's a bingo! And the ore they rejected is often still stuffed in the stopes or laying in a pile around the mine! Most of the ore processed in El Paso was smuggled up from Mexico. By the time everyone gets their cut down there, there is nothing left. Most of that ore from small Mexican miners heads this way believe it or not. At least it did until recently. The Sinaloa Cartel is big on mining these days. They are trying to diversify their portfolio. They are deep into the coltan business. I bet they have processes set up to handle other ores as well as thugs to control the Mexican mineros. I can imagine they are playing the same game with minerals as they do with poppies, dope, fish and corn. I know for a fact they have the corner on the coltan market from Columbia. Why would they not take over other guerrilla mining as well? So if you are lookin for a place to sell your ore in Mexico I bet the Barrio Azteca can hook you right up. Expect to haggle a bit.
  15. Bedrock Bob

    10" coil Gold Bug II

    I have one that I have used quite a bit hunting meteorites. It seems like it is a little pickier with ground balance and will false signal easy. I was finding a lot of burned trees and bedrock. A lot of rhyolite tuff that I was hunting over was impossible to deal with. And the range of ground balance where I was tuned was much narrower. Probably because the coil covered more ground. I bought it so I could move faster and cover some more ground but I found it a bit frustrating. I never got comfortable with it and thought the tiny elliptical was much better. The bigger coil might have added some depth though. I wish I could say I loved it. I do love the GB2 but I always use that tiny elliptical coil. It is lighter, the balance is better and it is a lot more sensitive. It's not as wild and chattery as the larger coil either. So there is my two cents.
  16. Bedrock Bob

    TV show Meteorite Men

    The very epitome thereof. A dedicated and hardworking entrepreneur with a booming nickel sucking business.
  17. Bedrock Bob

    TV show Meteorite Men

    Indeed. I think my Pole's strategy paralleled that of P.T. Barnum... Better to suck the nickel out of a thousand meteorites than extract a diamond from one.
  18. Bedrock Bob

    Opinion?

    The surface texture does not look like a met to me. It does look like the texture of what I call an iron pseudomorph. I have found several that are strongly magnetic and look just like that. They do not streak grey like magnetite but not red like hematite. Kinda earthy reddish brown. They are limonite turning to hematite or something. They are submetallic inside and fresh surfaces are bright but they dull after a few hours. I have no idea what it is but I would be skeptical of it being a meteorite based only on looks and magnetism. What did the window look like?
  19. Bedrock Bob

    TV show Meteorite Men

    The one from Boston, Mass.
  20. Bedrock Bob

    TV show Meteorite Men

    She could sure vacuum the nickel out of a specimen faster than a spectroscopic analysis if you know what I mean.
  21. Bedrock Bob

    Mineral identification requests

    Every town in New Mexico has a borrow pit, a stone quarry and a screening plant on BLM. Most hot mix plants are too. These are a lot more common operations on public land than any type of metals mine. Gathering field stone and quarrying flagstone is a huge business. Most of it is done on BLM by permit. The Forest Service issues permits to gather field stone too. I am not sure about commercial quarrying operations. A pickup bed covered in stone 8" deep in sandstone fetches $300 in Santa Fe. Hundreds of men are doing it. You can easily load and sell one truckload per day. Take a look at LR200. That tells the tale on what mineable commodities are being taken from BLM land. You will see that mining in the west on BLM land is a lot more about aggregates and building stone than metals by a huge margin. That is because there is money in aggregate and building stone. Not so much in metals. The richest guy I know made his fortune digging fill dirt to build I-25 on public land. He claimed gravel in strategic places and set up gravel plants along a 350 mile stretch. He has one of the biggest construction companies in the state. He mined placer gold until he started skipping the washing process and just selling truckloads of dirt. Before the project was complete he was a multi millionaire and had a huge construction company with many millions in equipment. All of this was from rock and dirt taken from public land claims along the length of the highway.
  22. Bedrock Bob

    Mineral identification requests

    I am not sure there is a next step up from running a drywasher. Unless it is finding hardrock pockets in oxidized ore or finding a patch of nice float with the metal detector. For the individual that is just about as good as it is going to get. A nice nugget now and then or a hot section of bedrock that fills the vial. There are still some interesting treasure hunts out there to be had. Very few involve finding a mine. There are a lot of valuable natural commodities we walk right by every day. I look for plants a lot now and I see a lot more potential there than metals. As far as minerals go you can mine decorative and landscape stone and sell it for a neat profit. I don't know anyone making a go at gold mining despite several nice deposits being available. I do however know two guys that mine zeolite and building stone and do very well. So while metals mining may not offer much future there are other things that glitter besides gold. Just screening construction sand will net $5 per yard. You would be hard pressed to run sand with gold that would return that profit. May as well sell it for concrete!
  23. Bedrock Bob

    TV show Meteorite Men

    Now you have me thinking about that Pole again...
  24. Bedrock Bob

    Mineral identification requests

    Clay is giving you the scoop Chris. His info is way more current than mine. Back in the 90's Phelps Dodge had a refinery in El Paso. They would buy any metal scrap no matter how small. And would refine concentrates based on what you had. ASARCO smelter was still running and if they could not handle a small batch of ore in their process they just put it on a train car and shipped it to Canada. They would buy a few tons of anything as long as it assayed well. Buying ore was their business. You had to provide 30 tons or more. PD at Playas was a custom smelter taking ore from Peru that ran 300-600 opt. They wanted flux. They would pay metal values plus a few bucks a ton just for the silica. They needed 100 tons to consider your offer. If you had ore that was 90% silica you could deal with them. Otherwise they referred you to Morenci. The smelter at Hurley was operated by several outfits. They only did ore form the Chino pit but they would buy tons of ore from a few operating flux mines in the area. A few guys got together and combined their ore with one of these small mines. Kind of a co-operative. Until about '95 there were a few miners that would band together to create feedstock that would interest the mine. My assumption was they were shipping it somewhere else to be processed. Maybe they were just needing the flux really bad. Flux mining is about the only thing that thrives around those big smelter operations. Morenci would just about take anything. Even small quantities. They would crush and split a sample and make an offer. They worked with the smelter in Butte as well as Canada and most of the ore they bought went north. I sold 30 tons of silver/lead.copper ore to them and only wound up owing them $200 for it when it was all over. And there was a couple of fly-by-night operations in El Paso that handled ore. Spooky outfits. But they would buy ore by the pickup load if they thought they could squeeze the gold or silver out of it. They recovered gold no doubt but it was very difficult to get your money out of these guys. They were the source of many campfire stories for sure. All of them except Morenci are long gone. And the last I heard the guys around here were having to ship 55 gallon barrels of concentrate to Canada by semi truck. I know one fellow operating a silver prospect in the Black Range and he smelts his ore right there at the mine in a acetylene fired oven after a reducing process. I don't think he has a profitable operation but he does mine and pour bars every year. At least he was as of a few years ago. When he is gone that will probably be the last silver mined in the Sierra Diablo. Chances are he is probably ready gone.
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